New Video Celebrates 50th Anniversary of Wild & Scenic Rivers Act

Credit: NPS.gov

Communities across the nation are preparing to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act. This landmark legislation passed by Congress in October 1968 safeguards the free-flowing character of rivers by precluding them from being dammed, while allowing the public to enjoy them. It encourages river management and promotes public participation in protecting streams.

As part of the celebration, the National Park Service released a new video highlighting a handful of ‘Wild and Scenic’ designated rivers in the Northeast – the Farmington, Sudbury, Assabet, Concord, and Musconetcong Rivers – along with the organizations and community volunteers who work together to protect and care for these rivers.

Princeton Hydro is proud to work with two of the river stewards featured in the video: Musconetcong Watershed Association (MWA) and Farmington River Watershed Association (FRWA).

The Musconetcong River:

Designated ‘Wild and Scenic’ in 2006, the Musconetcong River is a 45.7-mile-long tributary of the Delaware River in northwestern New Jersey.

Princeton Hydro has been working with MWA in the areas of river restoration, dam removal, and engineering consulting since 2003 when the efforts to remove the Gruendyke Mill Dam in Hackettstown, NJ began. To date, Princeton Hydro has worked with MWA to remove five dams on the Musconetcong River, the most recent being the Hughesville Dam.

As noted in the video, the removal of these dams, especially the Hughesville dam, was a major milestone in restoring migratory fish passage along the Musconetcong. Only a year after the completion of the dam removal, American shad returned to the “Musky” for the first time in 250 years.

“The direction the river is moving bodes well for its recovery,” said Princeton Hydro President Geoff Goll, P.E., who was interviewed in the 50th anniversary video. “This multidisciplinary approach using ecology and engineering, paired with a dynamic stakeholder partnership, lead to a successful river restoration, where native fish populations returned within a year. ”

The Farmington River:

The Upper Farmington River, designated as ‘Wild and Scenic’ in 1994, stretches 14-miles through Connecticut starting above Riverton through the New Hardford/Canton town line. The river is important for outdoor recreation and provides critical habitat for countless wildlife.

Credit: FWRA.orgBack in 2012, Princeton Hydro worked with the FRWA and its project partners to remove the Spoonville Dam. Built in 1899 on the site of a natural 25-foot drop in the riverbed, the dam was originally a hydropower facility. The hurricanes and flood of 1955 breached the dam, opening a 45-foot gap and scattering massive dam fragments in the riverbed downstream. The remnant of the main dam persisted for decades as a 128-foot long, 25-foot high obstacle in the channel. The river poured through the breach in a steep chute that stopped American shad from proceeding further upstream to spawn.

The project was completed, from initial site investigation through engineering assessment and final design, in just six months. The dam removal helped to restore historic fish migrations in the Farmington River (including the American shad) and increase recreation opportunities.

Wild & Scenic Rivers Act:

Credit: NPS.govAs of December 2014 (the last designation), the National ‘Wild and Scenic’ System protects 12,734 miles of 208 rivers in 40 states and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico; this is a little more than one-quarter of 1% of the nation’s rivers. By comparison, more than 75,000 large dams across the country have modified at least 600,000 miles, or about 17%, of American rivers.

In honor of the 50th anniversary of the Act and in an effort to designate many more miles of river as ‘Wild and Scenic,’ four federal agencies and four nonprofit groups are coordinating nationwide events and outreach. Managing agencies are the Bureau of Land ManagementFish and Wildlife ServiceForest Service, and National Park Service, along with American RiversAmerican WhitewaterRiver Network and River Management Society. Go here for more info: www.wildandscenicrivers50.us.

Lake Mohawk Country Club Publication Features Princeton Hydro

The Lake Mohawk Country Club (LMCC) recently published an article in The Papoose, the organization’s newsletter, that featured Princeton Hydro Founder Dr. Steve Souza and announced that he received the North American Lake Management Society’s “2017 Lake Management Success Stories Award” for his work with Lake Mohawk.

The award specifically recognizes the exceptional service provided to Lake Mohawk, the New Jersey Coalition of Lake Associations (NJCOLA) and the Lake Mohawk Preservation Foundation (LMPF). The nomination for the award was submitted by Barbara Wortmann, Interim GM of the LMCC, Ernest Hofer PE, Science Advisor to LMPF and Board President of NJCOLA, and the full Board of Trustees of NJCOLA.

As the article states, Steve and the Princeton Hydro team have worked to develop and implement successful lake management strategies to restore and protect the health of the lake and its surrounding watershed. Lake Mohawk is now a role model for all of New Jersey’s lakes.

While accepting his award Dr. Souza stated, “this would not have been possible had it not been for the foresight of the Lake Mohawk Country Club and the support we have received over the years from the Lake Board, the current General Manager Barbara Wortmann, Steve Waehler and the Lake Committee, Ernie Hofer and Gene DePerz of the Lake Mohawk Preservation Foundation, and of course the late Fran Smith.” Steve went on to thank his staff at Princeton Hydro, especially Chris Mikolajczyk, CLM and Dr. Fred Lubnow, for their efforts over the years.

More About Lake Mohawk Lake Restoration:

Nutrient pollution is one of the main problems affecting lakes throughout the United States. In small amounts, nitrates and phosphates can be beneficial to many ecosystems. However, in excessive amounts, nutrients cause eutrophication. Eutrophication stimulates an explosive growth of algae (algal blooms) that depletes the water of oxygen and cause serious water quality issues. Lake Mohawk was suffering from eutrophication issues.

In the early 1990’s, Princeton Hydro was contracted by the LMCC to conduct a detailed water quality and trophic state assessment of the lake. The data was used to prepare a comprehensive lake management master plan.

A unique element of the plan was the design and installation of a “one-of-a-kind” continual, dosing alum pumping system, which reduced and controlled the lake’s sizable internal total phosphorus load and the phosphorus originating from stormwater and other external sources. This innovative nutrient control program was the first of its kind in New Jersey, and, to this day, remains in operation and is the foundation of the lake’s restoration. Following suit from Lake Mohawk’s success, a similar system was also designed and installed in White Meadow Lake and that system is also largely responsible for its restoration.

The success of this program was recognized by the USEPA through an Environmental Excellence Award, by the NJDEP through an Environmental Initiative Award, by the NALMS through a Technical Merit Award, and now by NALMS with the 2017 Lake Management Success Stories Award.

Read more about the accomplishments at Lake Mohawk in the LMCC’s recent Papoose newsletter.