Princeton Hydro Founder Invited to Speak at EPA’s Harmful Algal Blooms Workshop

Princeton Hydro Founder Dr. Steve Souza was an invited speaker at the USEPA Region 2 Freshwater Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) and Public Drinking Water Systems workshop last week in Manhattan. The objective of the workshop was to share information about the monitoring and assessment of freshwater HABs and the efforts to minimize their effect on public drinking water and the recreational uses of lakes.

Steve’s presentation focused on the proactive management of HABs, providing useful tips for and real-world examples of how to address HABs before they manifest, and, if a HAB does manifest, how to prevent it from further exacerbating water quality and cyanotoxin problems.

The workshop was well attended with 80 people on site and 40 others participating via webinar link. Steve was joined by nine other invited speakers, most of whom were representing the USEPA, NYSDEC and NJDEP, who gave presentations on a variety of HABs related topics, including the optimization of water treatment operations to minimize cyanotoxin risks surveillance and assessment of HABs, and communicating HABs risks in recreational lakes and drinking water reservoirs.

If you’re interested in learning more about HABs, you can view a complete copy of Steve’s presentation, titled Proactive Management of Harmful Algae Blooms in Drinking Water and Recreational Waterbodies, by clicking the image below. Please contact us anytime to discuss how Princeton Hydro’s Invasive Weed and Algae Management Services can be of service to you.

The USEPA Region 2 serves New Jersey, New York, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and eight tribal nations. Get more info on key issues and initiatives in USEPA Region 2.

 

 

Princeton Hydro Participates in Rutgers Engineering Honors Council Competition

Princeton Hydro President Geoff Goll, P.E. participated as an alumni judge in the Rutgers Engineering Honors Council (REHC) Annual Case Competition.

The REHC Case Competition is an annual event in which students are given a case detailing a Rutgers-related issue and have a limited amount of time to analyze the case problem, develop a solution, and present their plans to a panel of alumni judges.

The judges critique the group and individuals on presentation, creativity, participation, feasibility of solution, and additional criteria. The competition is divided into two tiers, where the winners of each grouping of presentations then present to determine a final winner.

Over the past three years, more than one hundred students have participated and have included deans, alumni, administrators, and faculty in the development of the competition. This year, the judging panel incorporated four alumni, including Goll, who judged separate groups of three teams, and then joined together with the other judges to critique the final round of presentations.   

“It was a truly wonderful experience,” said Goll. “It’s so encouraging to see such eager and bright young minds that are on their way to becoming future engineering leaders.”

REHC, founded in 2011, is composed of Honors Academy and Honors College representatives and honor society presidents to provide a uniform voice to all sectors of the honors community in the School of Engineering. Students find unique opportunities to be mentored by industry professionals, engage with successful alumni, and exchange talents with their peers. 

Goeff Goll, Civil Engineering Class of 1990, brings extensive experience in water resources and geotechnical engineering to the table. He is highly experienced in stream restoration, dam removal, the design of large retaining structures, and building foundations and stormwater management systems.

 

Aquatic Organism Passage: A Princeton Hydro Blog Series

Introducing part one of a multi-part blog series about aquatic organism passage
What you’ll learn:
  • What is aquatic organism passage?
  • Why is it important?
  • How does Princeton Hydro support it?

This photo from NYS DEC demonstrates a well-designed stream crossing.

Since the US government began allotting funds for building roads in U.S. national forests in the late 1920s, hundreds of thousands of culverts were built across the country. Culverts, or drainage structures that convey water underneath a barrier such as a road or railroad, were originally built with the intention of moving water quickly and efficiently. While this goal was met, many migratory fish and other aquatic organisms could not overcome the culverts’ high-velocity flows, sending them away from their migratory destinations. If the culvert was perched, or elevated above the water surface, it would require the migratory aquatic animals to both leap upwards and fight the unnaturally fast stream current to continue their journeys. Additionally, turbulence, low flows, and debris challenged the movement of aquatic organisms.

Thus, the goal of aquatic organism passage (AOP) is to maintain connectivity by allowing aquatic organisms to migrate upstream or downstream under roads. AOP “has a profound influence on the movement, distribution and abundance of populations of aquatic species in rivers and streams”. These aforementioned species include “fish, aquatic reptiles and amphibians, and the insects that live in the stream bed and are the food source for fish”.

This photo from NYS DEC demonstrates a poorly-designed stream crossing.

A poorly designed culvert can harm fish populations in multiple ways. If sturgeon aren’t able to surpass it, habitat fragmentation prevails. And so, a once-connected habitat for thousands of sturgeon breaks into isolated areas where a few hundred now live. When the population was in the thousands, a disease that wiped out 80% of the population would still leave a viable number of individuals left to survive and mate; a population of a few hundred will be severely hurt by such an event. In sum, habitat fragmentation raises the risk of local extinction (extirpation) as well as extinction in general.

The splintering of a large population into several smaller ones can also leave species more vulnerable to invasive species. Generally, the greater the biodiversity harbored in a population, the stronger its response will be against a disturbance. A dwindling community of a few hundred herring will likely succumb to an invasive who preys on it while a larger, more robust community of a few thousand herring has a greater chance of containing some individuals who can outcompete the invasive.

Aquatic Organism Passage in Action at Princeton Hydro

Princeton Hydro recently teamed up with Trout Unlimited to reconnect streams within a prized central-Pennsylvanian trout fishery.  Our team enabled aquatic organism passage by replacing two culverts in Pennsylvania’s Cross Fork Creek. Read about it here!

Sources:

“Aquatic Organism Passage through Bridges and Culverts.” Flow. Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation’s Watershed Management Division, 31 Jan. 2014. Web. 14 Mar. 2017.

Hoffman, R.L., Dunham, J.B., and Hansen, B.P., eds., 2012, Aquatic organism passage at road-stream crossings— Synthesis and guidelines for effectiveness monitoring: US Geological Survey Open-File Report 2012-1090, 64p.

Jackson, S., 2003. “Design and Construction of Aquatic Organism Passage at Road-Stream Crossings: Ecological Considerations in the Design of River and Stream Crossings.” 20-29 International Conference of Ecology and Transportation, Lake Placid, New York.

Kilgore, Roger T., Bergendahl, Bart S., and Hotchkiss, Rollin H. Publication No. FHWAHIF-11-008 HEC-26. Culvert Design for Aquatic Organism Passage Hydraulic Engineering Circular Number 26. October 2010.

Princeton Hydro Founder Receives Lake Management Achievement Award

We’re thrilled to announce that Princeton Hydro Founder Dr. Stephen J Souza received the North American Lake Management Society’s “2017 Lake Management Success Stories Award” for his work with Lake Mohawk.

While accepting his award Dr. Souza stated, “this would not have been possible had it not been for the foresight of the Lake Mohawk Country Club and the support we have received over the years from the Lake Board, the current General Manager Barbara Wortman, Steve Waehler and the Lake Committee, Ernie Hofer and Gene DePerz of the Lake Mohawk Preservation Foundation, and of course the late Fran Smith.”

Steve went on to thank his staff at Princeton Hydro, especially Chris Mikolajczyk and Dr. Fred Lubnow, for their efforts over the years “collecting and analyzing a variety of lake data and implementing the innovative restoration practices responsible for the lake’s water quality improvements.”

Since 1990, Dr. Souza has worked with the Lake Mohawk Country Club and the Lake Mohawk Preservation Foundation to develop and implement successful lake management strategies to restore and protect the health of the lake and its surrounding watershed.

The NALMS award recognizes an individual or team with notable accomplishment of lake and reservoir management efforts that demonstrate improvements in lake/reservoir condition or watershed management in a cost-effective manner.

Many thanks to Lake Mohawk for the continued partnership and steadfast commitment to water quality. And, thanks to NALMS for bestowing Dr. Souza with this great honor.

Click here to see the complete 2017 awards recap from NALMS.

Princeton Hydro Team Trained in USACE MII Cost Estimating Software

Congratulations to Amy McNamara and James Hunt of Princeton Hydro who received their certificates of completion for the in-depth training of the October 2017 MCACES (Micro-Computer Aided Cost Estimating System), 2nd Generation (MII) Training Course in Atlanta, Georgia. MCACES is an integrated cost estimating system that meets the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) requirements for preparing cost estimates for civil works projects.

This 32-hour course provided an in-depth look at the software application and its components which are used to build detailed construction cost estimates. In a classroom setting, Amy and Jim learned how to prepare and execute computerized cost estimates using parametric worksheets, quantity linking, and assemblies. Our engineering team now has the capability to navigate through the MII software and libraries to create a project, cost items, crews, labor and equipment. Amy and Jim understand how to work with database functions to create site-specific unit prices, modify equipment costs for project specific circumstances, and adjust crew for overtime and shift differential.

Now being used by many of the USACE districts, it will soon be a requirement for all USACE districts to use MII, as well as all architect-engineering (A-E) firms performing design work for the USACE.

“We are looking forward to using the program to help our Federal partners meet their mission objectives,” stated Geoff Goll, President of Princeton Hydro. “The completion of such training efforts continues our commitment to supporting the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ efforts in the North Atlantic Division and beyond.”

Barnegat Bay Green Infrastructure Project Named “Project of the Year”

Princeton Hydro is thrilled to announce that American Littoral Society’s Barnegat Bay Green Infrastructure Project has been named “Project of the Year” by The American Society of Civil Engineers Central Jersey Branch.

The award-winning project was a collaboration between the Littoral Society, Princeton Hydro and key partners that involved implementing a variety of green infrastructure stormwater management projects in order to decrease the volume of runoff and associated pollutants flowing into and damaging Barnegat Bay.

The green infrastructure projects were designed to treat stormwater at its source while delivering environmental, social and economic benefits to the Bay. Completed projects include:

  • Conversion of standard, grassed detention basins into naturalized bio-retention basins, as exemplified by the Laurel Commons Carnation Circle Basin, which now serves as a paradigm for the cost-effective retrofitting of aged, traditional detention basins
  • At Toms River High School North, the installation of tree boxes,
  • At the Toms River Board of Education offices, the replacement of conventional paving with permeable pavement,
  • At multiple sites, the construction of rain gardens,
  • At Toms River High School North, the construction/installation of stormwater management Manufactured Treatment Devices (MTDs)
  • At the Toms River Community Medical Center (RWJ Barnabas Health), the construction of a bio-retention/infiltration basin

The entire Princeton Hydro team extends our warmest congratulations to Helen Henderson and all of the folks at American Littoral Society for winning this prestigious award! Princeton Hydro is proud to partner with this incredible organization and is grateful for the work they do to protect our beautiful coastline and save the bay!

The Awards Dinner and celebration takes place on Tuesday, October 17th at the Forsgate Country Club. The “Project of the Year” nomination was originally submitted by Princeton Hydro founder Dr. Stephen Souza on behalf of the Littoral Society.

For a more detailed summary and photos of the award-winning project, click here.

Environmental Education Opportunity

Upcoming Course Announcement:
Green Infrastructure Stormwater Management 1-Day Class

Members of the Princeton Hydro team are teaching a 1-day class on Green Infrastructure Stormwater Management Techniques at Montclair State University.

This innovative class, offered through the University’s Continuing Professional Education Services program, focuses on the proper selection, design, implementation and maintenance of green infrastructure techniques commonly used in urban and suburban settings. Multiple site examples will be provided helping participants walk away with a deeper understanding of how to apply what they learn in real-world scenarios.

The course will be held on Friday, October 6, 2017 from 8:00 AM to 4:00 PM. Advance registration is required. To sign up for and get more course details, click here.

Continuing Professional Education Services, LLC is the brainchild of Dr. Jorge H. Berkowitz and Philip I. Brilliant. From the inception of the Continuing Environmental Education for Professional (CEEP) program at the College of Science and Mathematics (CSAM) at Montclair State University, Dr. Berkowitz and Mr. Brilliant have been in the classroom and in the boardroom assuring the success of the program. In order to better serve the community of professionals, Dr. Berkowitz and Mr. Brilliant stepped forward with a solution that has saved the ability to offer continuing education credit-bearing courses at the second largest public higher education institution in New Jersey. Together they form CPES at Montclair State University!

The Return of the American Shad to the Musconetcong River

PHOTO/New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife biologist Pat Hamilton holds a shad near the Warren Glen Dam

After a 250+ year absence, American shad have returned to the Musconetcong River in Hunterdon and Warren counties. This milestone in the ecological recovery of the river is the result of the removal of dams on the lower Musconetcong several years ago, followed by the removal of the Hughesville Dam in Warren County last year.

Removing the dams opened nearly six miles of the Musconetcong to migratory fish, such as American shad, that spend much of their lives in the ocean but return to rivers and their tributaries to spawn. The shad’s return is a good sign of the overall ecological health and diversity of the river.

Princeton Hydro was proud to partner with the Musconetcong Watershed Association and so many other incredible organizations who came together on the Hughesville Dam Removal project. To date, Princeton Hydro has investigated, designed and permitted five dam removals on the Musconetcong.

The next Musconetcong dam targeted for removal is the 32-foot high Warren Glen Dam, less than a mile farther upstream. It is the largest dam in the river; by comparison, the Hughesville Dam was 15-feet tall.

Princeton Hydro President Geoff Goll, P.E. published this commentary piece titled, “The Return of the American Shad to the Musconetcong River:”

Update (June 15, 2017)NJDEP issued press release on the finding of American shad on the Musky. Bob Shin, NJDEP Commissioner, stated, “[t]he return of shad, a benchmark species indicative of the overall ecological health and diversity of a waterway, is an exciting milestone…. This achievement is the direct result of an ongoing partnership among state and federal agencies, nonprofit groups, and dam owners – all committed to making this beautiful waterway free-flowing again.

On June 7, 2017, Princeton Hydro celebrated along with the Musconetcong Watershed Association (and an excellent story of the MWA, human history of the river, and the efforts to preserve the history and ecology can be found here) and other project partners, the discovery of American shad on the Musconetcong River in NJ, over 250 years after they were blocked from this major tributary of the Delaware River – On September 8, 2016, then Secretary of the Interior, Sally Jewell, held a press conference to celebrate the initial breach of the Hughesville Dam on the Musconetcong River (time lapse of removal is here). The press conference was held as the Department of the Interior via of the US Fish and Wildlife Service provided the funding to remove this obsolete structure through their Hurricane Sandy Recovery funding and the Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration program. In addition to the Honorable Sally Jewell, NJDEP Commissioner Bob Martin, and US Army Corp of Engineers, Philadelphia District Commander Lt. Colonel Michael Bliss, were also on hand to speak about the importance of the Hughesville Dam removal and dam removal in general. To have such dignitaries at the highest levels of our Federal and State government speak at a project our firm designed was truly an honor and privilege. It was a great day to celebrate the next obsolete dam on the Musconetcong River to fall to the progress of river restoration. However, this would pale in comparison to the news we received on Wednesday, June 7, 2017, when the NJ Division of Fish and Wildlife confirmed the presence of the American shad (Alosa sapidissima) above the Hughesville Dam!

Ms. Patricia Hamilton, Fisheries Biologist of NJ Fish And Wildlife, reported that they “spotted small schools of American Shad (at most 6 at a time) and captured 4 several hundred yards downstream of the Warren Glen Dam”, five miles from the confluence of the Delaware River. This is the first documentation of American shad on this river in over 250 years! So, what is the big deal you may ask.

The American shad is the Mid-Atlantic and Southeastern United States’ salmon; it is actually a clupeid, a forage type fish closely related to herrings and sardines. Like herrings and sardines, they are a very oily fish, high in omega-3 fats, and low in contamination. It is also a fairly large clupeid, reaching three to eight pounds as adults. Like the salmon, American shad are anadromous, meaning they live the major part of their lives in the ocean and spawn up the coasts’ rivers. The American shad is not a spectacularly looking fish to say the least, and in fact, looks like a “generic” illustration of a fish, unlike the sleek and sexy salmon. It doesn’t even jump. However, this fish is a long distance and endurance swimmer, who’s migration from its hatching in rivers of the East Coast to its primary habitat in the Atlantic Ocean up in the Gulf of Maine, makes it one of the Earth’s great travelers. It can swim nearly 20,000 kilometers in its first five years of life and can dive to depths of up to 375 meters. And like all of its clupeid kindred, it is both a key prey species for many large fish and cetaceans in the Atlantic’s pelagic zone (open ocean) and an important commercial fish. But it is the existence of over-fishing, pollution and dams that had brought this species to its knees in many of the major eastern US rivers.

While the Delaware River shad and herring species have rebounded somewhat from low populations in the mid-1900s with the advent of the US Clean Water Act, they continue to struggle to regain their numbers, and in fact, there is now a moratorium on catching river herring in the Delaware River, and NJ has a moratorium on the harvesting of shad and herring on its tributaries to the Delaware River and Atlantic Ocean. As far as tributary access is concerned, the largest tributaries to the Delaware, the Schuylkill and Lehigh Rivers, are still blocked by dams to their mouths with very little efficiency of fish ladders provided; with their dams having very little success in gaining support for the removal of their blockages. So, any gains in additional spawning habitat for such anadromous species is viewed as a significant victory. The opening of the Musconetcong River to migrating fish will be a large contributor to the rebound of American shad, and other river herring species.

As one of the original 13 colonies, NJ was an integral partner in the start of the United States and early industrial revolution. It has been documented through our research during the dam removal regulatory permit application process on this waterway that the Musconetcong River has been dammed just about all the way to its confluence with the Delaware River since the mid-1700s, and likely much earlier. So, before there was anyone who understood the importance of unimpeded rivers for fish migration, this particular route was cut-off in its entirety, and then remained so for well over 250 years. So, it is understandable that there was no reason to assume that anadromous fish, such as shad, would resume the use of the river in a short period of time; however, there existed the right habitat for them, should they be afforded access…and the hope of the partners working on this river. There were doubters, to be sure, but “lo and behold”, we now know these mighty fish took advantage of an opening almost immediately.

Now, I am not stating that American shad immediately realized that the Hughesville Dam was gone and took a B-line from the Delaware River to the highest unimpeded location. First, other dams downstream of the Hughesville Dam had been removed over the past several years. These dams included the Finesville Dam (for an excellent video of the story of this dam removal, check out this video by the US Fish and Wildlife Service), removed in 2011 and the Reigelsville Dam remnants (there were two additional remnants found when the first foundation was removed) soon after the Finesville Dam was removed. So, it is likely that American Shad had started moving up the river to the base of the Hughesville Dam between 2011 and 2016. Still the response by American shad is nothing short of spectacular. For the over 250 years this species has not been able to use this river, at all, and now, within a span less than six years of dam removal activities, this fish is raring to comeback and, hopefully, spawn and increase their numbers.

And the efforts are not nearly complete for the Musconetcong River. The finding of the American shad five miles upstream from the Delaware River shows that this river can and, now, does support this fish. This generic looking fish, yet awesome product of evolution should only fuel the fire of continued restoration efforts, proof-positive that the labor and funds spent here, in this river, gets results. Such funds and labor (an staggering amount of time, blood, sweat, and tears) are required in order to get the river restoration work done. These projects have received the majority of their backing from the federal government, through grant programs, natural resource damage funds, and direct Congressional authorized funds. Without support from Washington, D.C.,, and Trenton, none of this work would be possible. And to get these funds, required work by the many team partners to prepare applications, meet with federal agencies, and educate the public through open and transparent meetings and communication. This was an impressive effort by the residents of this watershed, professionals who provided their expertise, and the state and federal employees who have dedicated their lives to this kind of work.

The Musconetcong River, with its recovering ecosystem, and its human and non-human inhabitants continue to amaze me in how we should all strive to strike balance between man and nature; and all this is being accomplished in the most densely populated state in the nation.

The finding of American shad gives me reason to cheer, and is why I do what I do. This is it, the return of a species that at one time we had no assurance would return, has returned. This is hope for us, after all.

Read more about Princeton Hydro’s river restoration and dam/barrier services on our website. Please contact us anytime if you have a project you’d like to discuss.

NJ Audubon undertakes $470G study of climate change impact on wetlands

Princeton Hydro is proud to be a partner on this incredible project

If you’ve ever gone birdwatching at any east coast wildlife refuge, then you probably understand the value of coastal impoundments. These man-made wetland habitats are contained by embankments and have gates that allow managers to manipulate water levels. In addition to being valuable, these structures are also very vulnerable to sea level rise and extreme weather.

Through a $470,000 federal grant, the New Jersey Audubon is implementing an initiative to study the vulnerability of these impoundments to climate change induced environmental impacts. Funded by the U.S. Department of the Interior via the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, the Coastal Impoundment Vulnerability and Resilience Project (CIVRP) aims to map and catalog all state, federal, and privately owned coastal impoundments from Virginia to Maine. The project is a cooperative effort of a diverse team of partners including researchers from New Jersey Audubon, National Wildlife Federation, Conservation Management Institute (Virginia Tech), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Princeton Hydro.

The CIVRP will ultimately reduce climate vulnerability and enhance the natural ecosystem function of these precious and treasured wetland habitats. Read the full article from MyCentralJersey.

Princeton Hydro specializes in the restoration, creation and enhancement of tidal and freshwater wetlands. Contact us to learn more, and read about some of our award-winning wetland-related projects here.

Princeton Hydro Projects Recap

In Case You Missed It:
A Recap of Projects Recently Completed by the
Princeton Hydro Aquatic & Engineering Departments

Members of our New England Regional Office team conducted a detailed survey at a culvert prioritized for replacement in the Town of Stony Point, New York. This structure was one of several identified as important to both habitat and flood risk during the development of Stony Point’s Road-Stream Crossing Management Plan. The Princeton Hydro team will use the collected data to develop a conceptual design and implementation strategy for a replacement structure using the Stream Simulation design method developed by the U.S. Forest Service.

Special thanks to Paul Woodworth, Fluvial Geomorphologist, and Sophie Breitbart, Staff Scientist, for their excellent work on this project!

The Truxor was put to work dredging a pond in Union Gap, New Jersey. The Truxor is an extremely versatile amphibious machine that can perform a variety of functions, including weed cutting and harvesting, mat algae and debris removal, silt pumping, channel excavation, oil spill clean-up, and much more!

We recently designed and installed a solar-powered aeration system in Hillsborough, New Jersey. Solar pond and lake aeration systems are cost-effective, eco-friendly, sustainable, and they eliminate the need to run direct-wired electrical lines to remote locations. Princeton Hydro designs, installs and maintains various aeration and sub-surface destratification systems for public drinking water purveyors, municipal and county parks, private and public golf courses, and large lake communities throughout the East Coast.

Here’s a look at a project in Elizabeth, New Jersey to clear the area of phragmites. Phragmites is an invasive weed that forms dense thickets of vegetation unsuitable for native fauna. It also outcompetes native vegetation and lowers local plant diversity. Previously, the entire site was filled with phragmites. Late last year, we utilized the Marsh Master to remove the invasive weed. Now that its almost Spring, we’re back at the site using the Marsh Master to mill and cultivate the ground in preparation for re-planting native plant species. A big shout out to our Aquatic Specialist John Eberly for his great work on this project!

In this photo, our intern and engineering student currently studying at Stevens Institute of Technology, Veronica Moditz, is gathering data on the Hughesville Dam removal. She’s using GPS to check the elevation of the constructed riffle on the beautiful Musconetcong River.

Members of the Princeton Hydro team worked in South New Jersey doing annual maintenance on nine stormwater infiltration basins that were also designed and constructed by Princeton Hydro. The maintenance work involves clearing vegetation from the basins to ensure the organic matter does not impede infiltration of the water as per the basins’ design. This project also involves the management of invasive plant species within the basins. Stormwater infiltration basins provide numerous benefits including preventing flooding and downstream erosion, improving water quality in adjacent waterbodies, reducing the volume of stormwater runoff, and increasing ground water recharge.

We recently completed a project in New Jersey for which we used our Truxor machine to dredge a stormwater retention basin. The basin had accumulated large amounts of sediment which were impeding the flow of water into the basin. We equipped the Truxor with its standard bucket attachment and a hydraulic dredge pump. The dredging operation was a success and now the basin is clear and functioning properly.

Stay Tuned for More Updates!