Green Infrastructure Planting Projects

The Princeton Hydro team has been busy this summer installing over 1700 plants at three of the company’s green infrastructure stormwater management project sites.

First, team members finalized the planting of two rain gardens located at Clawson Park in East Amwell, NJ. They also installed plants in a renovated detention basin located at the West Amwell Municipal Building. Finally, together with members of the American Littoral Society team, the team finalized the planting of an expanded rain garden and a newly constructed bio-infiltration planter box at Toms River High School North, Toms River, NJ. All three projects are 319(h) funded projects.

Everyone dug-in, got their hands dirty and the payoff to all of this planting is less runoff and less pollutant loading to our streams and rivers!

Read more about Princeton Hydro’s green infrastructure projects here.

Celebrate “Lakes Appreciation Month” All Year

It’s officially the last day of #LakesAppreciation Month, but that certainly doesn’t mean our love for lakes is limited to one month out of the year. Here are a few ideas from North American Lake Management Society (NALMS) for how to appreciate your community lakes all year long:

  1. Appreciate them by enjoying them; plan outings with your family and friends
  2. Arrange a lake or watershed clean-up event; check out these tips for how to get started
  3. Help monitor your local waterbody; New Jersey residents can go here to learn about Community Water Monitoring volunteer opportunities
  4. Inspire others to #getoutside and enjoy; as you’re out and about appreciating your local lakes, remember to take photos and share on social media using these hashtags: #LakesAppreciation and #NALMS

Always remember to enjoy your local lakes responsibly. Here are a few tips to help you have fun in nature while having minimal environmental impact.

(Pictured above: Budd Lake in Mount Olive Township, Morris County, New Jersey)

The Return of the American Shad to the Musconetcong River

PHOTO/New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife biologist Pat Hamilton holds a shad near the Warren Glen Dam

After a 250+ year absence, American shad have returned to the Musconetcong River in Hunterdon and Warren counties. This milestone in the ecological recovery of the river is the result of the removal of dams on the lower Musconetcong several years ago, followed by the removal of the Hughesville Dam in Warren County last year.

Removing the dams opened nearly six miles of the Musconetcong to migratory fish, such as American shad, that spend much of their lives in the ocean but return to rivers and their tributaries to spawn. The shad’s return is a good sign of the overall ecological health and diversity of the river.

Princeton Hydro was proud to partner with the Musconetcong Watershed Association and so many other incredible organizations who came together on the Hughesville Dam Removal project. To date, Princeton Hydro has investigated, designed and permitted five dam removals on the Musconetcong.

The next Musconetcong dam targeted for removal is the 32-foot high Warren Glen Dam, less than a mile farther upstream. It is the largest dam in the river; by comparison, the Hughesville Dam was 15-feet tall.

Princeton Hydro President Geoff Goll, P.E. published this commentary piece titled, “The Return of the American Shad to the Musconetcong River:”

Update (June 15, 2017)NJDEP issued press release on the finding of American shad on the Musky. Bob Shin, NJDEP Commissioner, stated, “[t]he return of shad, a benchmark species indicative of the overall ecological health and diversity of a waterway, is an exciting milestone…. This achievement is the direct result of an ongoing partnership among state and federal agencies, nonprofit groups, and dam owners – all committed to making this beautiful waterway free-flowing again.

On June 7, 2017, Princeton Hydro celebrated along with the Musconetcong Watershed Association (and an excellent story of the MWA, human history of the river, and the efforts to preserve the history and ecology can be found here) and other project partners, the discovery of American shad on the Musconetcong River in NJ, over 250 years after they were blocked from this major tributary of the Delaware River – On September 8, 2016, then Secretary of the Interior, Sally Jewell, held a press conference to celebrate the initial breach of the Hughesville Dam on the Musconetcong River (time lapse of removal is here). The press conference was held as the Department of the Interior via of the US Fish and Wildlife Service provided the funding to remove this obsolete structure through their Hurricane Sandy Recovery funding and the Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration program. In addition to the Honorable Sally Jewell, NJDEP Commissioner Bob Martin, and US Army Corp of Engineers, Philadelphia District Commander Lt. Colonel Michael Bliss, were also on hand to speak about the importance of the Hughesville Dam removal and dam removal in general. To have such dignitaries at the highest levels of our Federal and State government speak at a project our firm designed was truly an honor and privilege. It was a great day to celebrate the next obsolete dam on the Musconetcong River to fall to the progress of river restoration. However, this would pale in comparison to the news we received on Wednesday, June 7, 2017, when the NJ Division of Fish and Wildlife confirmed the presence of the American shad (Alosa sapidissima) above the Hughesville Dam!

Ms. Patricia Hamilton, Fisheries Biologist of NJ Fish And Wildlife, reported that they “spotted small schools of American Shad (at most 6 at a time) and captured 4 several hundred yards downstream of the Warren Glen Dam”, five miles from the confluence of the Delaware River. This is the first documentation of American shad on this river in over 250 years! So, what is the big deal you may ask.

The American shad is the Mid-Atlantic and Southeastern United States’ salmon; it is actually a clupeid, a forage type fish closely related to herrings and sardines. Like herrings and sardines, they are a very oily fish, high in omega-3 fats, and low in contamination. It is also a fairly large clupeid, reaching three to eight pounds as adults. Like the salmon, American shad are anadromous, meaning they live the major part of their lives in the ocean and spawn up the coasts’ rivers. The American shad is not a spectacularly looking fish to say the least, and in fact, looks like a “generic” illustration of a fish, unlike the sleek and sexy salmon. It doesn’t even jump. However, this fish is a long distance and endurance swimmer, who’s migration from its hatching in rivers of the East Coast to its primary habitat in the Atlantic Ocean up in the Gulf of Maine, makes it one of the Earth’s great travelers. It can swim nearly 20,000 kilometers in its first five years of life and can dive to depths of up to 375 meters. And like all of its clupeid kindred, it is both a key prey species for many large fish and cetaceans in the Atlantic’s pelagic zone (open ocean) and an important commercial fish. But it is the existence of over-fishing, pollution and dams that had brought this species to its knees in many of the major eastern US rivers.

While the Delaware River shad and herring species have rebounded somewhat from low populations in the mid-1900s with the advent of the US Clean Water Act, they continue to struggle to regain their numbers, and in fact, there is now a moratorium on catching river herring in the Delaware River, and NJ has a moratorium on the harvesting of shad and herring on its tributaries to the Delaware River and Atlantic Ocean. As far as tributary access is concerned, the largest tributaries to the Delaware, the Schuylkill and Lehigh Rivers, are still blocked by dams to their mouths with very little efficiency of fish ladders provided; with their dams having very little success in gaining support for the removal of their blockages. So, any gains in additional spawning habitat for such anadromous species is viewed as a significant victory. The opening of the Musconetcong River to migrating fish will be a large contributor to the rebound of American shad, and other river herring species.

As one of the original 13 colonies, NJ was an integral partner in the start of the United States and early industrial revolution. It has been documented through our research during the dam removal regulatory permit application process on this waterway that the Musconetcong River has been dammed just about all the way to its confluence with the Delaware River since the mid-1700s, and likely much earlier. So, before there was anyone who understood the importance of unimpeded rivers for fish migration, this particular route was cut-off in its entirety, and then remained so for well over 250 years. So, it is understandable that there was no reason to assume that anadromous fish, such as shad, would resume the use of the river in a short period of time; however, there existed the right habitat for them, should they be afforded access…and the hope of the partners working on this river. There were doubters, to be sure, but “lo and behold”, we now know these mighty fish took advantage of an opening almost immediately.

Now, I am not stating that American shad immediately realized that the Hughesville Dam was gone and took a B-line from the Delaware River to the highest unimpeded location. First, other dams downstream of the Hughesville Dam had been removed over the past several years. These dams included the Finesville Dam (for an excellent video of the story of this dam removal, check out this video by the US Fish and Wildlife Service), removed in 2011 and the Reigelsville Dam remnants (there were two additional remnants found when the first foundation was removed) soon after the Finesville Dam was removed. So, it is likely that American Shad had started moving up the river to the base of the Hughesville Dam between 2011 and 2016. Still the response by American shad is nothing short of spectacular. For the over 250 years this species has not been able to use this river, at all, and now, within a span less than six years of dam removal activities, this fish is raring to comeback and, hopefully, spawn and increase their numbers.

And the efforts are not nearly complete for the Musconetcong River. The finding of the American shad five miles upstream from the Delaware River shows that this river can and, now, does support this fish. This generic looking fish, yet awesome product of evolution should only fuel the fire of continued restoration efforts, proof-positive that the labor and funds spent here, in this river, gets results. Such funds and labor (an staggering amount of time, blood, sweat, and tears) are required in order to get the river restoration work done. These projects have received the majority of their backing from the federal government, through grant programs, natural resource damage funds, and direct Congressional authorized funds. Without support from Washington, D.C.,, and Trenton, none of this work would be possible. And to get these funds, required work by the many team partners to prepare applications, meet with federal agencies, and educate the public through open and transparent meetings and communication. This was an impressive effort by the residents of this watershed, professionals who provided their expertise, and the state and federal employees who have dedicated their lives to this kind of work.

The Musconetcong River, with its recovering ecosystem, and its human and non-human inhabitants continue to amaze me in how we should all strive to strike balance between man and nature; and all this is being accomplished in the most densely populated state in the nation.

The finding of American shad gives me reason to cheer, and is why I do what I do. This is it, the return of a species that at one time we had no assurance would return, has returned. This is hope for us, after all.

Read more about Princeton Hydro’s river restoration and dam/barrier services on our website. Please contact us anytime if you have a project you’d like to discuss.

Princeton Hydro Photo Contest

To celebrate Earth Week 2017, Princeton Hydro founder Steve Souza launched an internal company photo contest for which he asked everyone to submit their best photos of nature.

A panel of judges reviewed the photos through a blind judging process, narrowed it down to the top five, and ultimately chose a winner. Without further ado, we’d like to congratulate Michael Rehman for scoring the 1st place win! His “Barred Owl” photo won him a $100 gift certificate and lots of bragging rights.

So many great photos were submitted – we just had to share them! The photo album below includes Michael’s winning pic, the runners up, and a selection of photos submitted by each of the contest participants. Thanks to everyone who had a hand in the photo contest! Keep getting out there and enjoying nature!

Winning Photo "Barred Owl" by Michael Rehman

Winning Photo
“Barred Owl” by Michael Rehman

Read about Princeton Hydro’s 2016 Earth Day Photo Contest here.

Princeton Hydro Projects Recap

In Case You Missed It:
A Recap of Projects Recently Completed by the
Princeton Hydro Aquatic & Engineering Departments

Members of our New England Regional Office team conducted a detailed survey at a culvert prioritized for replacement in the Town of Stony Point, New York. This structure was one of several identified as important to both habitat and flood risk during the development of Stony Point’s Road-Stream Crossing Management Plan. The Princeton Hydro team will use the collected data to develop a conceptual design and implementation strategy for a replacement structure using the Stream Simulation design method developed by the U.S. Forest Service.

Special thanks to Paul Woodworth, Fluvial Geomorphologist, and Sophie Breitbart, Staff Scientist, for their excellent work on this project!

The Truxor was put to work dredging a pond in Union Gap, New Jersey. The Truxor is an extremely versatile amphibious machine that can perform a variety of functions, including weed cutting and harvesting, mat algae and debris removal, silt pumping, channel excavation, oil spill clean-up, and much more!

We recently designed and installed a solar-powered aeration system in Hillsborough, New Jersey. Solar pond and lake aeration systems are cost-effective, eco-friendly, sustainable, and they eliminate the need to run direct-wired electrical lines to remote locations. Princeton Hydro designs, installs and maintains various aeration and sub-surface destratification systems for public drinking water purveyors, municipal and county parks, private and public golf courses, and large lake communities throughout the East Coast.

Here’s a look at a project in Elizabeth, New Jersey to clear the area of phragmites. Phragmites is an invasive weed that forms dense thickets of vegetation unsuitable for native fauna. It also outcompetes native vegetation and lowers local plant diversity. Previously, the entire site was filled with phragmites. Late last year, we utilized the Marsh Master to remove the invasive weed. Now that its almost Spring, we’re back at the site using the Marsh Master to mill and cultivate the ground in preparation for re-planting native plant species. A big shout out to our Aquatic Specialist John Eberly for his great work on this project!

In this photo, our intern and engineering student currently studying at Stevens Institute of Technology, Veronica Moditz, is gathering data on the Hughesville Dam removal. She’s using GPS to check the elevation of the constructed riffle on the beautiful Musconetcong River.

Members of the Princeton Hydro team worked in South New Jersey doing annual maintenance on nine stormwater infiltration basins that were also designed and constructed by Princeton Hydro. The maintenance work involves clearing vegetation from the basins to ensure the organic matter does not impede infiltration of the water as per the basins’ design. This project also involves the management of invasive plant species within the basins. Stormwater infiltration basins provide numerous benefits including preventing flooding and downstream erosion, improving water quality in adjacent waterbodies, reducing the volume of stormwater runoff, and increasing ground water recharge.

We recently completed a project in New Jersey for which we used our Truxor machine to dredge a stormwater retention basin. The basin had accumulated large amounts of sediment which were impeding the flow of water into the basin. We equipped the Truxor with its standard bucket attachment and a hydraulic dredge pump. The dredging operation was a success and now the basin is clear and functioning properly.

Stay Tuned for More Updates!

Tracking and Managing Harmful Algae Blooms

A Presentation by Princeton Hydro Founder Dr. Stephen Souza
Available for Free Download Here

The presentation covers all things related to identifying, addressing and preventing Harmful Algae Blooms (HABs), including:

  • Understanding what defines HABs, Cyanobacteria and Cyanotoxins
  • Dispelling common misconceptions about HABs
  • Educating on the health implications associated with HABs, specifically related to drinking water and recreational water usage
  • Learning about PARETM – Princeton Hydro’s unique strategy for addressing HABs
    • (P)redict – Forecasting a bloom
    • (A)nalyze – Measuring and quantifying a bloom
    • (R)eact – Implementing measures to prevent and control a bloom
    • (E)ducate – Providing community outreach and public education

To learn more about Princeton Hydro’s Invasive Weed and Algae Management Services, visit our website or contact us!

 

Princeton Hydro Announces Leadership Transition

Enjoy Your Labor Day Adventures Responsibly

Princeton Hydro Offers
Seven Tips for Environmentally-Friendly Outdoor Fun

 

Labor Day is right around the corner! Many people will soon be packing up the car with fishing gear, and heading to their favorite lake for a fun-filled weekend.

As biologists, scientists and outdoor enthusiasts, all of us at Princeton Hydro fully enjoy getting outside and having fun in nature. We also take our responsibility to care for and respect our natural surroundings very seriously. We play hard and work hard to protect our natural resources for generations to come.

These seven tips will help you enjoy your Labor Day fishing, boating and outdoor adventures with minimal environmental impact:

  • Before you go, know your local fishing regulations. These laws protect fish and other aquatic species to ensure that the joys of fishing can be shared by everyone well into the future.
  • Reduce the spread of invasive species by thoroughly washing your gear and watercraft before and after your trip. Invasives come in many forms – plants, fungi and animals – and even those of microscopic size can cause major damage.
  • Stay on designated paths to avoid disrupting sensitive and protected areas, like wetlands, shorelines, stream banks and meadows. Disturbing and damaging these sensitive areas can jeopardize the health of the many important species living there.
  • Exercise catch and release best practices. Always keep the health of the fish at the forefront of your activities by using the right gear and employing proper techniques. Get that info by clicking here
  • Use artificial lures or bait that is native to the area you’re fishing in. Live bait that is non-native can introduce invasive species to water sources and cause serious damage to the surrounding environment.
  • Plan ahead and map your trip. Contact the office of land management to learn about permit requirements, area closures and other restrictions. Use this interactive map to find great fishing spots in your area, the fish species you can expect to find at each spot, nearby gear shops, and more!

Armed with these seven tips, you can now enjoy your weekend while feeling rest assured that you’re doing your part to protect the outdoor spaces and wild places we all love to recreate in! Go here to learn about some of the work Princeton Hydro does to restore and protect our natural resources.

120903 Dock
“Respect nature and it will provide you with abundance.”

–compassionkindness.com

Princeton Hydro’s Conservation Spotlight

AMERICAN LITTORAL SOCIETY: SAVING BARNEGAT BAY

This Conservation Spotlight explores and celebrates
the American Littoral Society’s efforts to save Barnegat Bay

Screen Shot 2016-08-22 at 12.18.53 PM

Barnegat Bay stretches 42-miles, primarily along the inner-coast of Ocean County, New Jersey. The “Bay” is nationally recognized as a unique estuarine ecosystem with a variety of different habitats that many species depend on for survival. Due to numerous factors, but especially the development of its watershed and resulting high levels of nitrogen loading from stormwater runoff, the Bay has suffered serious ecological decline.

In an effort to save the Bay, the American Littoral Society developed a multi-faceted Clean Water Project plan, which focuses heavily on one of the Bay’s key issues: eutrophication due to excessive nitrogen loading. In partnership with Princeton Hydro, the Ocean County Soil District and others, American Littoral Society began work to decrease the volume of stormwater runoff and associated pollutants flowing into and damaging the Bay.

Screen Shot 2016-08-22 at 11.58.17 AMIn 2013, American Littoral Society, with assistance provided by Princeton Hydro, successfully secured $1,000,000 in 319(h) implementation funding through the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. American Littoral Society then developed an innovative basin ranking matrix. The matrix, created by Princeton Hydro, provides a non-biased, quantitative means of identifying and ranking stormwater management projects having the greatest potential to decrease pollutant loading to the Bay.

With funding secured and a prioritization methodology in place, American Littoral Society then began its work to retrofit antiquated, inefficient stormwater basins throughout the Barnegat Bay watershed. The goal was to reduce runoff through upgraded stormwater management systems emphasizing the application of green infrastructure techniques.

American Littoral Society and Princeton Hydro along with key partners implemented a variety of green infrastructure projects to treat stormwater at its source while delivering environmental, social and economic benefits to Barnegat Bay. Completed projects include:

  • 2 Years After Planting was Completed: Laurel Commons, Carnation Basin RetrofitConversion of standard, grassed detention basins into naturalized bio-retention basins, as exemplified by the Laurel Commons Carnation Circle Basin, which now serves as a paradigm for the cost-effective retrofitting of aged, traditional detention basins
  • At Toms River High School North, the installation of tree boxes,
  • At the Toms River Board of Education offices, the replacement of conventional paving with permeable pavement,
  • At multiple sites, the construction of rain gardens,
  • At Toms River High School North, the construction/installation of stormwater management Manufactured Treatment Devices (MTDs)
  • At the Toms River Community Medical Center (RWJ Barnabas Health), the construction of a bio-retention/infiltration basin

Education and outreach have also been key factors in improving the condition of the Bay, including training seminars for engineers, planners and code officials on basin conversion and management of green infrastructure; educational materials and signage; and public involvement in volunteer clean-ups, lawn fertilizer usage reduction, and rain garden and basin planting.  

Through its work with key partners, like Princeton Hydro, and countless volunteers, the American Littoral Society has made notable progress in Barnegat Bay, but much more needs to be done to restore and protect this unique ecosystem. Join the cause to help save Barnegat Bay; contact the American Littoral Society to find out how you can make a difference. 

For a detailed review of each project and an in-depth look at the incredible work being done to save Barnegat Bay, go here and download our brochure.

About the American Littoral Society: The American Littoral Society, founded in 1961, promotes the study and conservation of marine life and habitat, protects the coast from harm, and empowers others to do the same.

How to Improve Water Quality in Your Community

Simple steps lead to big leaps in protecting water quality!
Clean water is essential to the health of communities everywhere! Here are eight things you can do to protect water resources in your community and beyond:
  • Stop mowing near streams and pondsMowing near streams and ponds eliminates the natural protective buffer that tall grasses, shrubs and trees provide. Natural buffers protect against erosion, filter stormwater runoff, reduce harmful pollutant loads and provide habitat for mosquito-eating amphibians, fish, birds and beneficial insects.
  • Reduce lawn fertilizer usage: One of the best ways to support the health of local water resources is to reduce the use of pesticides and fertilizers. Not only are they costly, but, when over-applied or if applied right before a rainstorm, the chemicals runoff directly into our local waterways. Before applying, always remember to test your soil, read product labels and check the forecast. Also consider natural alternatives like composting!
  • Host a “Test Your Well” event: Well testing is a great way to promote groundwater protection, help people understand their role in safeguarding drinking water quality, and provide education around the proper disposal of oil, chemicals, pesticides and medicines. Learn how to host an event in your community!
  • Design and construct a rain garden: You’ve heard this one from us before, but, what can we say, we love rain gardens, and rightfully so! They’re cost effective, easy to build and do wonders in reducing erosion, promoting ground water recharge, minimizing flooding and removing pollutants from stormwater runoff. Read all about them!
  • Test and treat your ponds and lakes: Testing your pond/lake water is an important part of preventing problems like harmful weed and algae growth. Princeton Hydro professionals can provide a comprehensive analysis and an array of eco-friendly approaches to control nuisance species and promote the continual health of your pond/lake. Learn more!
  • Reduce erosion and exposed soil on your property: If you notice erosion occurring on your property, planting native plants can really help! Their roots stabilize the soil, reduce erosion and prevent sediment loading in your waterways, which has a huge impact on the water quality of downstream ponds, lakes and reservoirs!
  • Develop a stewardship plan for your community: Bring your community together to help preserve its natural resources. Princeton Hydro’s team of natural resource scientists can help you get the ball rolling by preparing stewardship plans focused on controlling invasive species and protecting the long-term health of open spaces, forests habitats, wetlands and water-quality in your community.
Contact us to discuss how Princeton Hydro can help you protect your local water resources and keep your community healthy for future generations! 
“Water is life, and clean water means health.”
Audrey Hepburn