June 5: Restoration Ecology Course at Rutgers University

Join us on Wednesday, June 5 for a One-Day Environmental Training Course

Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education is offering a one-day class that explores the utilization of mitigation and sustainable design techniques to reduce stormwater impacts and increase storm resiliency.

The course, designed for ecologists, engineers, planners, and landscape architects involved in the recovery of impacted river, lake, riparian, wetland, and coastal environments, draws heavily upon real-world examples of restoration ecology in practice. This interactive course focuses specifically on the multi-disciplined recovery of degraded, damaged, or impaired ecosystems.

Dr. Stephen Souza, a founding principal of Princeton Hydro and owner of Clean Waters Consulting, LLC, is the main instructor and course coordinator. The course curriculum includes lessons from Dr. Souza and a number of experts from the Princeton Hydro team, including:

  • “River Restoration – Large Scale Dam Removal” lead by President Geoffrey Goll, P.E.
  • “Restoration of Tidal Ecosystems – The Creation of the Bayonne Golf Club” lead by Vice President Mark Gallagher
  • “Green Infrastructure and Coastal Resiliency” lead by Senior Project Manager & Environmental Scientist Christiana Pollack, GISP, CFM
  • “Does Green Infrastructure Mitigate Flooding?” lead by Dr. Souza

Course instruction will also be provided by John Miller, P.E., CFM, CSM, FEMA Mitigation Liaison; Nathaniel Burns, Langan Engineering Project Landscape Architect; and Capt. Al Modjeski, American Littoral Society Habitat Restoration Program Director.

In addition to 0.7 Rutgers CEUs, the course also awards participants with professional credits, including:

  • Landscape Architecture Continuing Education System (LA CES): 7.25 hours
  • NY Landscape Architects: 10.5 hours CL; 10 hours EA
  • NJ Public Health Continuing Education Contact Hours: 7.5
  • NJ Licensed Water & Wastewater Operators: 7 TCHs
  • NJ Certified Public Works Managers (CPWM): 5 Technical, 2 Government
  • NJ Licensed Professional Engineers: 6 Continuing Professional Competency (CPC) credits
  • NY Professional Engineers: 7 hours
  • NJ Licensed Site Remediation Professionals (LSRP): 6.5 Technical CEC’s

The course will be held on Wednesday, June 5 2019 from 8:30AM to 5:00PM at the Rutgers Continuing Education Center at the Atrium in Somerset, NJ. Register on or before May 22 to take advantage of a discounted early registration fee. Pre-registration is required. Continental breakfast and buffet lunch are provided at no additional cost.

Princeton Hydro is proud to partner with Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education and take part in this valuable continuing professional education course. We hope to see you there!

 

Recycled Christmas Trees Used to Restore Disappearing NJ Shoreline

INNOVATIVE COASTAL RESILIENCY DESIGN USING RECYCLED CHRISTMAS TREES IMPLEMENTED BY VOLUNTEERS ALONG DISAPPEARING POINT PLEASANT SHORELINE

To prevent further erosion at the Slade Dale Sanctuary in Point Pleasant, dozens of volunteers helped stabilize the shoreline using a technique that has never been done before in New Jersey.  On Saturday, American Littoral Society, in partnership with Princeton Hydro, Borough of Point Pleasant, New Jersey Nature Conservancy, New Jersey Corporate Wetlands Restoration Partnership, and the Point Pleasant Rotary Club, organized dozens of volunteers to restore the shoreline and prevent further erosion at the Slade Dale Sanctuary using recycled Christmas trees.

As one of only a few areas of open space left in Point Pleasant, the 13-acre Slade Dale Sanctuary is an important part of the local ecosystem, and is home to a number of unique animals and plants. This waterfront preserve along the North Branch Beaver Dam Creek is predominantly tidal marsh, which provides habitat for various birds, including osprey, as well as passive recreation opportunities for the community.

Unfortunately, the Slade Dale Sanctuary is disappearing. Since 1930, the shoreline of Slade Dale Sanctuary has retreated approximately 300 feet, equal to the length of a football field, and the channels into the marsh have increased in number and size, according to a study we conducted on behalf of American Littoral Society, for which we provide engineering and natural resources management consulting services.

In order to stabilize the shoreline, restore the marsh, and enhance the ecological function and integrity of the preserve, Princeton Hydro developed a conceptual and engineering design using living shoreline features to enhance ecological value and reduce erosion. The final conceptual plan for restoration uses tree vane structures to attenuate wave action, foster sediment accretion, and reduce erosion along the coast.

To implement this vision and begin building back marsh, the project team is constructing several Christmas tree breakwaters and Christmas tree vanes that mimic naturally occurring debris structures in tidal systems and enhance habitat opportunity and shelter for aquatic life. Volunteers came together on Saturday, May 11 to help with the construction. The Mayor of Point Pleasant Robert A. Sabosik also attended the event, “The Barnegat Bay is an attribute that we all enjoy, and it’s something we have to protect.”

After the 2018 holiday season, the Good Sheppard Lutheran Church in Point Pleasant provided space to collect and store donated Christmas trees, which were then moved to the marsh a few days before the event. On the day of the event, recycled Christmas trees were transported from their staged locations on the marsh to the breakwater sections that were previously installed in the water. To transport them across the water to the pilings, volunteers used two methods: by walking a skiff boat loaded with trees through the water to the pilings or by forming assembly line from the shore to pilings to guide floating trees through the water (check out the album below!).  Then, they stuffed the Christmas trees between the pilings, securely tied them down, and staked Christmas trees directly into the creek bottom. For extra assurance, the placed and tied heavy bags of used oyster shells on top of the tree line. Oyster shells were donated by local Monmouth County restaurants in an effort to reduce waste streams.

“We really enjoyed participating in this event with American Littoral Society and so many wonderful volunteers,” Christiana L. Pollack, GISP, CFM, Princeton Hydro’s Project Manager for this restoration effort. “It is so wonderful to see this project coming to fruition. We’re so proud of our partnership with American Littoral Society and our combined efforts to revitalize and rehabilitate our precious coastal habitats.”

Members of the media were invited to attend the volunteer event. News 12 New Jersey covered the event and aired a story on it during their Sunday news broadcast, and NJTV News will be airing the story in the near future.

Many thanks to everyone who came out in support of this important restoration effort at Slade Dale Sanctuary American Littoral Society hosts volunteer events throughout the year. Go here to get involved.

 

Capture the Change at Roebling Park

By Kelsey Mattison, Marketing Coordinator

Our wetland restoration project at Roebling Park just got even cooler! The Mercer County Park Commission (MCPC) is launching a citizen science/outreach campaign to help them document the visual changes seen in the park as the restoration progresses.

MCPC invites visitors to the park to help capture the change from various vantage points within the park. There are seven photo stations spread throughout the park’s trail. All are clearly marked with signage and directions on how to participate in the Capture the Change initiative.

Because the restoration heavily involves the removal of invasive Phragmites australis, most of the vantage points currently overlook dense swaths of “phrag” overgrowth in the marsh. Once the restoration is complete, that overgrowth will give way to native flora, increased biodiversity, enhanced tidal function, more incredible viewscapes, and so much more.

Here are some photos we captured at MCPC’s guided hike through the marshland, introducing the Capture the Change initiative. These photos were taken at each Capture the Change vantage point along the trail.

First Capture the Change vantage point

Second Capture the Change vantage point

Third Capture the Change vantage point

Fourth Capture the Change vantage point

Fifth Capture the Change vantage point

Sixth Capture the Change vantage point

Seventh Capture the Change vantage point

You can join the Capture the Change initiative too by posting a photo from one of these vantage points and adding the hashtag #BagthePhrag. We can’t wait to watch this marshland transform!

For more details on this restoration project, check out this blog:

Restoring the Northernmost Freshwater Tidal Marsh on the Delaware River

Kelsey Mattison is Princeton Hydro’s Marketing Coordinator and a recent graduate of St. Lawrence University with a degree in English and environmental studies and a passion for environmental communication. Through her extracurricular work with various nonprofit organizations, she has developed expertise in social media management, content writing, storytelling, and interdisciplinary thinking. In her free time, Kelsey enjoys dancing of all sorts, going on long walks with her camera, and spending time with friends and family in nature.

Our 2019 Earth Day Photo Contest Winner!

In honor of Earth Day, Princeton Hydro held its annual Photo Contest with the theme “Earth as Art” for its employees. We’d like to thank everyone who submitted photos this year. Overall, we received 28 gorgeous photos from our staff.

All photos were rated on the following criteria by three judges: Danielle Odom, Lucy Aquilino, and Amanda Brooks (see bios below).

  • Technical Quality (30%)
  • Originality (30%)
  • Artistic Merit (40%)
THE WINNER OF THE PRINCETON HYDRO 2019 EARTH DAY PHOTO CONTEST IS…

“The Sands of Time. Microtopography created on a windswept beach.” Wildwood Crest, New Jersey. By Jack Szczepanski

Scroll to the bottom to see a gallery of runner-up photos.

ABOUT THE JUDGES:
DANIELLE ODOM

Danielle is a Lab Technician in the Watershed & Systems Ecology Department at The Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University. She studies macroinvertebrates as biological indicators and she’s currently studying to become a certified midge ID expert. A former teacher, she taught nature photography to middle school students.

Lucy Aquilino

Lucy is a retired Parole officer and amateur photographer. A mom of 2, she loves taking nature photos and going on adventures with her kids.

Amanda Brooks

Amanda is a nature enthusiast who loves taking long walks in the woods with her camera and notepad. With her degree in Environmental Studies and English and her background in the arts, she is always looking for creative ways to capture the beauty of nature to inspire its protection. She currently resides in Burlington, Vermont and works as a tree-monger at Gardener’s Supply Company. You can check out more of her work on her Facebook page. 

Check out the photos from last year’s Earth Day photo contest here:

Our Earth Day Photo Contest Winner

Arbor Day Bird Walk & Planting at Exton Park

On Thursday, April 25th, 2019, we teamed with the Friends of Exton Park and Homenet Automotive to host an early Arbor Day celebration at Exton Park in Exton, Pennsylvania. Paired with Bring Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day, the event drew over 35 volunteers (of all sizes) to help clean up Exton Park and plant 18 trees!

The day started with a leisurely bird walk throughout the park lead by Friends of Exton Park birders. Participants spotted Red-winged Blackbirds, a Solitary Sandpiper, a Wilson’s Snipe, a Downy Woodpecker and even a Green Heron.

After the bird walk, planting and clearing began. Together, volunteers cleared a hefty amount of multiflora rose and garlic mustard, two invasive species prevalent in the park. With the help of our Landscape Designer, Cory Speroff, MLA, ASLA, CBLP, and Senior Limnologist, Mike Hartshorne, volunteers also planted eight river birch, five red osier dogwood, and five swamp white oak trees throughout the park.

At Princeton Hydro, we value working with our clients and partners to create sustainable landscapes that include native plants that will thrive in our local ecosystems. At all our project sites, we aim to restore and maintain our natural habitats and landscapes. And, we love using teamwork to do it!

We were proud contribute the trees for this event and thank our volunteers for all their hard work. This is the second year we have participated in this Arbor Day volunteer event. We are looking forward to making it an annual tradition!

Friends of Exton Park offers weekly bird walks and volunteer opportunities throughout the year. Go here to learn more and get involved.

American Shad Discovered Just Miles Upstream of Former Columbia Dam

Struggling fish species returns to spawning grounds for the first time in over a century, just months after dam removal completed

For the first time in over a century, American Shad (Alosa sapidissima) have been discovered upstream from the former Columbia Dam site on the 42-mile long Paulins Kill river, an important tributary to the Delaware River in northwestern New Jersey. Princeton Hydro’s Senior Water Resources Engineer and avid fisherman, Dr. Clay Emerson, PE, CFM, caught an American Shad in the Paulins Kill miles above the previous dam site this past weekend.

A successful collaboration between The Nature Conservancy, American Rivers, Princeton Hydro, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and NJDEP Division of Fish and Wildlife Service, resulted in the removal of the out-of-commission hydroelectric Columbia Dam just months ago. Prior to this removal, American Shad and other migratory fish could not make it past the large dam structure to swim upstream to their important breeding grounds.

“I was thrilled to feel the familiar hit and see the flash of an American Shad as I reeled the fish to shore. Being an avid shad fisherman and enthusiast, I knew the significance of seeing this beautiful fish back in a place where it’s always belonged,” said Clay. “We are thrilled to witness the American Shad return upstream so quickly after the century-old Columbia dam was removed. It’s a testament to the nearly instant benefits that dam removal has on the riverine ecosystem.”

The American shad’s return is an excellent sign of the overall ecological health and diversity of the river. Historically, dams, overfishing, and pollution have caused population decline in many of the major eastern U.S. rivers. American Shad, deemed the “Mid-Atlantic salmon,” are anadromous, which means they spend much of their lives in the ocean but return to rivers and their tributaries to spawn. This long distance swimmer makes it one of the Earth’s great travelers. After spawning upstream in rivers of the East Coast, American Shad migrate to their primary habitat in the Atlantic Ocean up in the Gulf of Maine. Unlike the salmon of the Pacific Ocean, American Shad may return to their spawning grounds multiple times over their lifetime. The species is a key prey species for many large fish and cetaceans like dolphins and whales in the Atlantic Ocean.

“The best indicator of river water quality improving in the Paulins Kill is the appearance of shad miles upstream from the Columbia Dam,” said Dr. Barbara Brummer, New Jersey State Director of The Nature Conservancy. “Today, we celebrate proof that with the 100-year dam impediment removed, they are once again successfully swimming up the river. I could not be happier! This is what teamwork and passion for nature can achieve. It is a great day for conservation in New Jersey, with many more great days for shad in the Paulins Kill to come.”

Princeton Hydro was contracted to investigate, design, and apply for permits for the removal of this dam as requested by American Rivers in partnership with the New Jersey chapter of The Nature Conservancy. The firm investigated, designed, and prepared the necessary permits for the dam removal. The team of engineers and ecologists studied the feasibility of removal by collecting sediment samples, performing bioassay tests, and conducting a hydraulic analysis of upstream and downstream conditions.

A view of the Columbia Dam at the beginning of the removal process.

“We are proud to be a part of this collaborative project, which has had an immediate and positive impact to the ecosystem of the Delaware River Watershed and its fishery resources,” said Princeton Hydro’s President Geoffrey Goll, PE. “Re-discovering this Delaware River diadromous icon upstream of the former dam is a very promising sign that the river will once again return to a major migration route and nursery for American Shad. This is why we do what we do!”

A view of the former Columbia Dam towards the end of the dam removal process.

This Columbia Dam Removal project could not have been possible without the hard work and dedication of the following partner organizations: The Nature Conservancy of New Jersey, American Rivers, Princeton Hydro, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, RiverLogic Solutions, NJDEP Division of Fish and Wildlife Service, and SumCo EcoContracting.

Anglers are reminded, according to New Jersey fishing regulations, except for the Delaware River mainstem it is illegal to fish for shad in any fresh waters of New Jersey.

Princeton Hydro has designed, permitted, and overseen the reconstruction, repair, and removal of a dozens of small and large dams in the Northeast. To learn more about our fish passage and dam removal engineering services, visitbit.ly/DamBarrier.

6 Tips To Prepare Your Pond For Spring

It’s officially time to say goodbye to winter and “spring” your pond out of hibernation mode. We’ve put together six tips for getting your pond ready for Spring and ensuring it remains healthy all year long.

1. SPRING CLEANING 

The first step in preparing your pond for Spring is to give it a thorough cleaning. Remove leaves, debris, and any surface algae that may have accumulated over the winter. For shallow ponds, you may be able to use a net or pond rake to remove debris and sediment from the bottom and along the perimeter of the pond.

2. INSPECT YOUR POND FOR DAMAGE

Inspect your pond, including berms, outlet structures, and trash racks for any damage that may have occurred over winter due to ice. If you observe any damage, we recommend contacting a professional right away. One of our engineers or certified pond managers can determine if the damage is superficial or requires more significant repairs. Also, if your pond is equipped with an aeration system, before starting it up, be sure to schedule a system inspection. A thorough inspection and proper start-up procedure will ensure the system remains fully and effectively operational for the entire summer.

3. PUT YOUR POND TO THE TEST

The routine testing of your pond’s water quality is an important part of preventing harmful algae growth, fish kills, and other problems. We recommend conducting a “Spring start up” water quality analysis of your pond. The resulting data will inform the management process and allow for the development of a pro-active, eco-friendly management plan. Maintaining your pond’s water quality helps to control nuisance aquatic species and promote environmental conditions supportive of a healthy and productive fishery.

4. AQUASCAPE YOUR SHORELINE

It’s important to check the pond’s shoreline for any signs of erosion. Mowing to the water line, especially in ponds that have fluctuating water levels, can lead to severe shoreline erosion. Eroding shorelines can be easily stabilized by planting native, riparian plants.

Deep-rooted, native emergent aquatic vegetation is able to tolerate alternating periods of exposure and dry inundation. The correct combination of native aquatic plants, emergent wetland plants, and transitional upland plants can correct or prevent chronic shoreline erosion problems. A properly planted (aquascaped) edge beautifies the shoreline, stabilizes erosion problems, creates fish and amphibian habitat, attracts pollinating species and a variety of birds, and decreases mosquito breeding.

5. CONSIDER INSTALLING AN AERATION SYSTEM

Sub-surface aeration systems eliminate stagnant water and keep your pond thoroughly mixed and properly circulated. These systems are the most cost-effective and energy-efficient way to maintain proper pond circulation. Proper aeration enhances fish habitat, minimizes the occurrence of algae blooms, and prevents mosquito breeding. It’s best to contact a certified lake/pond manager to first determine if aeration is the right solution for you. If it is, an aeration system tailored to your pond’s needs can be designed and installed.

6. HAVE AN ECOLOGICALLY BALANCED POND MANAGEMENT PLAN

There is more to pond management than weed and algae treatments alone. There is also a big difference between simple pond maintenance and ecologically-based pond management. A customized pond management plan acts as a “blueprint” that guides  proactive, long-term care for your pond.

Our certified lake and pond managers can assess the status of your pond and provide you with an environmentally holistic management plan that is based on the unique physical, hydrologic, chemical, and biological attributes of your pond. A management plan identifies the causes of your pond’s problems and provides you with the guidance needed to correct these problems. The results are far more environmentally sustainable than simple (and often unnecessary) reactive weed and algae treatments.

 

To learn more about our lake and pond management services or schedule a consultation, visit: http://bit.ly/pondlake.

Part One: Damned If You Do, Dammed If You Don’t: Making Decisions and Resolving Conflicts on Dam Removal

People have been building dams since prerecorded history for a wide variety of economically valuable purposes including water supply, flood control, and hydroelectric power. Back in the 1950s and 60s, the U.S. saw a boom in infrastructure development, and dams were being built with little regard to their impacts on rivers and the environment. By the 1970s, the rapid progression of dam building in the U.S. led researchers to start investigating the ecological impacts of dams. Results from these early studies eventually fueled the start of proactive dam removal activities throughout the U.S.

Despite the proven benefits of dam removal, conflicts are a prevalent part of any dam removal project. Dam removal, like any other social decision-making process, brings up tensions around economics and the distribution of real and perceived gains and losses. In this two part blog series, we take a look at addressing and preventing potential conflicts and the key factors involved in dam removal decision-making – to remove or not to remove.

Why We Remove Dams

The primary reasons we remove dams are safety, economics, ecology, and regulatory. There has been a growing movement to remove dams where the costs – including environmental, safety, and socio-cultural impacts – outweigh the benefits of the dam or where the dam no longer serves any useful purpose. In some cases, it’s more beneficial economically to remove a dam than to keep it, even if it still produces revenue. Sometimes the estimated cost of inspection, repair, and maintenance can significantly exceed the cost of removal, rendering generated projected revenue insignificant.

Safety reasons are also vital, especially for cases in which dams are aging, yet still holding large amounts of water or impounded sediment. As dams age and decay, they can become public safety hazards, presenting a failure risk and flooding danger. According to American Rivers, “more than 90,000 dams in the country are no longer serving the purpose that they were built to provide decades or centuries ago.” Dam removal has increasingly become the best option for property owners who can no longer afford the rising cost of maintenance and repair work required to maintain these complex structures.

The goal of removal can be multi-faceted, including saving taxpayer money; restoring flows for migrating fish, other aquatic organisms, and wildlife; reinstating the natural sediment and nutrient flow; eliminating safety risks; and restoring opportunities for riverine recreation.

Moosup River

Common Obstacles to Dam Removal

Dam removal efforts are often subjected to a number of different obstacles that can postpone or even halt the process altogether. Reasons for retaining dams often involve: aesthetics and reservoir recreation; water intakes/diversions; hydroelectric; quantity/quality of sediment; funding issues; cultural/historic values of manmade structures; owner buy-in; sensitive species; and community politics.

Of those common restoration obstacles, one of the more frequently encountered challenges is cost and funding. Determining who pays for the removal of a dam is often a complex issue. Sometimes, removal can be financed by the dam owner, local, state, and federal governments, and in some cases agreements are made whereby multiple stakeholders contribute to cover the costs. Funding for dam removal projects can be difficult to obtain because it typically has to come from a variety of sources.

Anecdotally, opposition also stems from fear of change and fear of the unknown. Bruce Babbitt, the United States Secretary of the Interior from 1993 through 2001 and dam removal advocate, said in an article he wrote, titled A River Runs Against It: America’s Evolving View of Dams, “I always wonder what is it about the sound of a sledgehammer on concrete that evokes such a reaction? We routinely demolish buildings that have served their purpose or when there is a better use for the land. Why not dams? For whatever reason, we view dams as akin to the pyramids of Egypt—a permanent part of the landscape, timeless monuments to our civilization and technology.”

Negative public perceptions of dam removal and its consequences can seriously impede removal projects. Although there are many reasons for the resistance to dam removal, it is important that each be understood and addressed in order to find solutions that fulfill both the needs of the environment and the local communities.

Stay tuned for Part Two of this blog series in which we explore strategies for analyzing dams and what goes into deciding if a dam should remain or be removed.

Spring Events Spotlights: Earth Day, Arbor Day, Conferences, & More!

Princeton Hydro is participating in lots of interesting events this Spring; here’s a snapshot of what’s to come:

 April 22, 2019:  Slade Dale Restoration Volunteer Day

Celebrate Earth Day a few days early with a fun Jersey Shore volunteer event! The American Littoral Society, in partnership with Princeton Hydro, Borough of Point Pleasant, and the local Rotary Club, is organizing dozens of volunteers to restore the shoreline and prevent further erosion at the Slade Dale Sanctuary using recycled Christmas trees, a technique that is groundbreaking for New Jersey.  Help us transport donated/recycled Christmas trees to the marsh to breakwater sections, stuffed them between the pilings, and securely tie them down. The volunteer is from 10 AM to 4 PM and water and light refreshments will be served.  Dress to get wet and mess and don’t forget to bring sunscreen, lunch, and waders (if you have them!). Street parking is available along Sea Point Drive.

Register here.

 

April 25, 2019: Arbor Day Celebration with Friends of Exton

We’re celebrating Arbor Day with Friends of Exton Park! Join us on Thursday, April 25 for a bird walk and native tree and shrub planting. During the bird walk, which runs from 8:30 – 10:30 am, we hope to spot spring migrants. Planting will take place between 10:30 am and 12:30 pm, and then lunch will be provided.

We hope you’ll join us for a fun and productive day in Exton Park. Birders and nature enthusiasts of all skill levels are welcome!

RSVP here: friendsofextonpark@gmail.com 

 

May 1, 2019:  SAME NJ POST 2019 Small Business Council Breakfast 

Princeton Hydro is proud to be attending, sponsoring, and our Communications Strategist Dana Patterson is emceeing this year’s Society for American Military Engineers (SAME) NJ Post 2019 Small Business Council Breakfast, which is being held at the Forsgate Country Club in Monroe. The program consists of networking opportunities, a variety of speakers, and breakfast (of course!). SAME gives leaders from the A/E/C, environmental, and facility management industries the opportunity to come together with federal agencies in order to showcase best practices and highlight future opportunities for small businesses to work in the federal market.

May 3-4, 2019: New York State Federation of Lake Associations Annual Conference

New York State Federation of Lake Associations (NYSFOLA) will host its 36th Annual Conference May 3-4 at the Fort William Henry Conference Center in Lake George. This year’s conference, which is titled, “Empowering Lake Associations in Challenging Times,” will feature a diverse exhibitor hall, networking opportunities, a silent auction and a variety of educational sessions. Princeton Hydro is exhibiting and giving presentations on the following topics:

    • Development of a HABS/Cyanotoxin Management Plan by Dr. Fred Lubnow, Director of Aquatics
    • A Layman’s Guide on How Land Practices Impact Water Quality by Chris Mikolajczyk, CLM, Senior Aquatic Scientist
    • Dr. Stephen Souza, a founding principal of our firm, is giving two presentations: “Small Footprint Green Infrastructure Stormwater Management for Lake Communities” and  “Impacts of Carp on Water Quality.”
Learn More & Register

 

May 4, 2019: 10th Annual Sustainable South Jersey Earth Festival

Hosted by the nonprofit Sustainable South Jersey, the Sustainable South Jersey Earth Festival is the largest eco-event in the region, drawing 5000 visitors annually. This year’s festival is themed “Reduce Plastic – Fantastic!” and will feature a family-fun bike ride, musical entertainment, perennial native plant swap, exhibits from a variety of earth-friendly, eco-conscious vendors, outdoor arts & crafts, and more. Admission is free and everyone is welcome to attend. Advanced registration is required for the family-fun bike ride. Our Communications Strategist Dana Patterson recently joined the board of Sustainable South Jersey, and will be hopping around the event. We hope to see you there!

Learn More & Register to Ride

 

May 16, 2019: NJ Highlands Coalition 4th Annual Sustainable Golf Outing

New Jersey Highlands Coalition‘s mission is to protect, restore and enhance the water and other natural and cultural resources of the Highlands for the benefit of all citizens and businesses throughout the state. The organizations 4th Annual Golf Outing will be held at Hawk Pointe Golf Club, a unique golf course that incorporates the landscape of the Highlands into the course and uses some of the best available technology to recycle water and manage its footprint. During this year’s event, Princeton Hydro founder Dr. Stephen Souza will be honored for his dedication to preserving and improving New Jersey’s watersheds and natural water resources.

Learn More

 

May 20 – 22, 2019: 10th Annual Choose Clean Water Conference

The Choose Clean Water Coalition is hosting its 10th Annual Choose Clean Water Conference at the Baltimore Marriott Inner Harbor at Camden Yards.  This year’s conference, themed Clean Water. Healthy Communities, will feature workshops and breakout sessions on topics including stormwater, agriculture, communications and public engagement, and innovation and technology. Princeton Hydro is a proud sponsor of the event.

This year, an additional day has been added to the conference. On Monday, May 20 from 12 – 4pm, the Coalition, in partnership with the Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay, will host a A ForumPlus event focused on “Microplastics and Trash: A Local Look at a Regional Issue.”

Learn More & Register

 

May 23, 2019: Hydrilla Workshop
Our Director of Aquatic Programs, Dr. Fred Lubnow, is presenting on the control and eradication of hydrilla, an aquatic invasive plant, at a workshop in Wayne County! Hydrilla has been identified in Wayne County’s Lake Alden and recorded by the PA Natural Heritage Program in the PA iMapInvasives database. This workshop, hosted Wayne Conservation District, will focus on identification of Hydrilla and management options as well as methods to prevent the spread of aquatic invasives between waterbodies.
Learn More & Register

 

 

May 28, 2019: REI Inspirational Women Speaker Series: Restoring Nature
Engineers and dam removal experts Sally Harold, Director of River Restoration & Fish Passage for the Nature Conservancy;  Gwen Macdonald, Director of Green Projects for Save the Sound; and our very own Laura Wildman, PE will join together at the West Hartford REI to discuss their unique skills and passions around river restoration and dam removal, and provide tips on how to get started with environmental efforts in your community. Registration is required for this free event, all are welcome.
Learn More & Register

Wetland Restoration Project Wins “Land Ethics” Award of Merit

The Pin Oak Forest Conservation Area, located in a heavily developed area of northern Middlesex County, New Jersey, once suffered from wetland and stream channel degradation, habitat fragmentation, decreased biodiversity due to invasive species, and ecological impairment. The site was viewed as one of only a few large-scale freshwater wetland restoration opportunities remaining in this region of New Jersey. Thus, a dynamic partnership between government agencies, NGOs, and private industry, was formed to steward the property back to life and restore its natural function. Today, at Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve’s 19th Annual Land Ethics Symposium, Middlesex County and the project team were presented with the “Land Ethics Award of Merit” for its remarkable restoration achievements.

“In just a few years, the landscape at Pin Oak has transformed from a degraded, disconnected wetland to a healthy, high-functioning landscape,” said Mark Gallagher, Vice President of Princeton Hydro. “This restoration project exemplifies how a diverse group of public and private entities can work together to identify opportunities, overcome challenges and achieve tremendous success.”

The Pin Oak restoration team includes Middlesex County Office of Parks and Recreation, Woodbridge Township, Woodbridge River Watch, New Jersey Freshwater Wetlands Mitigation Council, GreenTrust Alliance, GreenVest, and Princeton Hydro.

The Pin Oak Forest Conservation Area is a 97-acre tract of open space that contains a large wetland complex at the headwaters of Woodbridge Creek. In 2017, the award-winning restoration project converted over 30 acres of degraded freshwater wetlands, streams and disturbed uplands dominated by invasive species into a species-rich and highly functional headwater wetland complex. The resulting ecosystem provides valuable habitat for wildlife and a nurturing environment for native plants such as pin oak, swamp white oak, marsh hibiscus, and swamp rose. The restored headwater wetland system provides stormwater management, floodplain storage, enhanced groundwater recharge onsite, and surface water flows to Woodbridge Creek, as well as public hiking trails, all benefiting the town of Woodbridge.

The Land Ethics Award recognizes the creative use of native plants in the landscape, sustainable and regenerative design, and ethical land management and construction practices. The recipient is selected by a jury of professionals in the field of design, preservation and conservation, and the award is presented at the Annual Symposium.

Photo courtesy of Barbara Storms, Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve.

In addition to the Award of Merit, Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve’s honored Dr. Marion Kyde with the 2019 Land Ethics Director’s Award and Doylestown Township Environmental Advisory Council with the 2019 Land Ethics Award. Congratulations to all of the winners!

Established in 1934, Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve is a 134-acre nature preserve, botanical garden, and accredited museum working to inspire the appreciation and use of native plants by serving as a sanctuary and educational resource for conservation and stewardship. For more information, visit www.bhwp.org.

Read more about the Pin Oak Forest Restoration project:

Innovative and Effective Approach to Wetland Restoration

To learn more about Princeton Hydro’s wetland restoration services and recent projects, visit us here: http://bit.ly/PHwetland