Wetland Restoration Project Wins “Land Ethics” Award of Merit

The Pin Oak Forest Conservation Area, located in a heavily developed area of northern Middlesex County, New Jersey, once suffered from wetland and stream channel degradation, habitat fragmentation, decreased biodiversity due to invasive species, and ecological impairment. The site was viewed as one of only a few large-scale freshwater wetland restoration opportunities remaining in this region of New Jersey. Thus, a dynamic partnership between government agencies, NGOs, and private industry, was formed to steward the property back to life and restore its natural function. Today, at Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve’s 19th Annual Land Ethics Symposium, Middlesex County and the project team were presented with the “Land Ethics Award of Merit” for its remarkable restoration achievements.

“In just a few years, the landscape at Pin Oak has transformed from a degraded, disconnected wetland to a healthy, high-functioning landscape,” said Mark Gallagher, Vice President of Princeton Hydro. “This restoration project exemplifies how a diverse group of public and private entities can work together to identify opportunities, overcome challenges and achieve tremendous success.”

The Pin Oak restoration team includes Middlesex County Office of Parks and Recreation, Woodbridge Township, Woodbridge River Watch, New Jersey Freshwater Wetlands Mitigation Council, GreenTrust Alliance, GreenVest, and Princeton Hydro.

The Pin Oak Forest Conservation Area is a 97-acre tract of open space that contains a large wetland complex at the headwaters of Woodbridge Creek. In 2017, the award-winning restoration project converted over 30 acres of degraded freshwater wetlands, streams and disturbed uplands dominated by invasive species into a species-rich and highly functional headwater wetland complex. The resulting ecosystem provides valuable habitat for wildlife and a nurturing environment for native plants such as pin oak, swamp white oak, marsh hibiscus, and swamp rose. The restored headwater wetland system provides stormwater management, floodplain storage, enhanced groundwater recharge onsite, and surface water flows to Woodbridge Creek, as well as public hiking trails, all benefiting the town of Woodbridge.

The Land Ethics Award recognizes the creative use of native plants in the landscape, sustainable and regenerative design, and ethical land management and construction practices. The recipient is selected by a jury of professionals in the field of design, preservation and conservation, and the award is presented at the Annual Symposium.

Photo courtesy of Barbara Storms, Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve.

In addition to the Award of Merit, Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve’s honored Dr. Marion Kyde with the 2019 Land Ethics Director’s Award and Doylestown Township Environmental Advisory Council with the 2019 Land Ethics Award. Congratulations to all of the winners!

Established in 1934, Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve is a 134-acre nature preserve, botanical garden, and accredited museum working to inspire the appreciation and use of native plants by serving as a sanctuary and educational resource for conservation and stewardship. For more information, visit www.bhwp.org.

Read more about the Pin Oak Forest Restoration project:

Innovative and Effective Approach to Wetland Restoration

To learn more about Princeton Hydro’s wetland restoration services and recent projects, visit us here: http://bit.ly/PHwetland

 

Fish Passage Restored on the Paulins Kill

A view of where the Columbia Lake Dam used to reside. February 19, 2019. Photo courtesy of Casey Schrading, Staff Engineer, Princeton Hydro

On the Paulins Kill, the 100-year old Columbia Lake Dam has almost been completely removed, and fish passage has been restored!  Since the first cut was executed on the main dam in August, many exciting advances have been made towards restoring the Paulins Kill back to its natural state. Check out the video below, courtesy of the New Jersey Nature Conservancy Volunteer Drone Team. 

Piece by piece, the dam was notched out throughout the fall season and is now completely removed with the exception of the dam apron, the horizontal concrete structure that sits downstream of the dam, and the section of the dam that sits below the riverbed. The part of the dam in the riverbed is now being removed all the way down  to three feet under the ground. The full removal is estimated to be complete by mid-March. In mid-August, the first cut was widened to 80 feet, allowing for better management of high flows during storm events, which had been posing a challenge immediately following the first cut.

In late August, the installation of rock vanes at the Brugler Road Bridge began. Rock vanes are engineered, in-stream structures that help to stabilize a channel while enhancing aquatic habitat and movement.

A generic schematic example of cross vanes, this is not the exact engineering plan for this specific project. Photo courtesy of North Carolina Cooperative Extension.

The rock vanes installed at the Brugler Road Bridge site are cross vanes. Cross vanes consist of a set of boulders angled upstream on a river, with another section of smaller rocks placed upstream. The taller sections of the cross vanes deflect the streamflow away from the banks, decreasing scouring effects. Instead, the flow travels over the rock walls and concentrates down the center of the channel, creating a deep and elongated pool in the middle of the stream.  

Velocities between the notches in the rock vanes were evaluated using a velocity meter in accordance with the design specifications originally proposed. Based on the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service fish passage design criteria, velocities in the notches could not be greater than 8.25 feet per second. All of the velocity measurements in this rock vane were below the maximum thresholds, ensuring no blockage of fish passage is made through the vanes.

Since the removal of the dam began, vegetative growth from the natural seedbed of the upper impoundment has been observed (see photo below).

In October, scour protection installation commenced at the Warrington Road Bridge site. After the team conducted geotechnical test pits, they discovered that a concrete scour wall that slopes out to the Paulins Kill was present and deep enough to be able to install rock at the necessary depth. They also found that the existing gabions, caged baskets filled with rock or concrete often used to protect against erosion, were intact and could be left in place. The team installed four (4) feet of riprap under and around the bridge in the riverbed and tied it into the existing grade of the banks.

The original notch in the dam was lowered one foot per day starting in mid-December, reducing water surface elevations down to the apron elevation during the month of January.

To accommodate NJ Fish and Wildlife’s request for animal passage under the I-80 bridges, an area of the previously installed riprap on the northwest abutment wall was flattened out and filled in with river cobble. This path will promote wildlife movement under the bridge as opposed to through the existing tunnel.

Currently, rock vanes are being installed under the I-80 bridges specifically to enhance fish passage. These structures vary slightly from the rock vanes at the Brugler Road Bridge site, as they are designed to slow river flow, helping migrating fish travel upstream and traverse a 5-foot elevation difference in the streambed, much like a fish ladder

These rock vanes are more than halfway completed and are on track to be finished in time for fish populations to make full use of them.  The next steps are to finish the demolition of the dam and the construction of the fish passage rock vanes under the I-80 bridges, plant vegetation throughout the upper impoundment, create a recreational trail through the upper impoundment, and plan for fishing and boating access! Stay tuned for more exciting developments on this incredible project.

Thank you to our project partners: The Nature Conservancy, American Rivers, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and NJDEP Division of Fish and Wildlife Service.

Princeton Hydro has designed, permitted, and overseen the reconstruction, repair, and removal of a dozens of small and large dams in the Northeast. To learn more about our fish passage and dam removal engineering services, visitbit.ly/DamBarrier.

NJ SPOTLIGHT OP/ED Addresses the Creation of Stormwater Utilities in New Jersey

NJ Spotlight recently published an Op/Ed piece co-authored by Association of New Jersey Environmental Commissions (ANJEC) Board of Trustees members John A. Thonet, P.E., P.P., and Dr. Stephen J. Souza, PhD.

The piece asserts the position that New Jersey needs stormwater utilities to provide a sustained source of local funding in order to improve and maintain stormwater infrastructure in communities throughout the state.

We’ve included an excerpt from the Op/Ed below:

NJ SPOTLIGHT OP-ED: NEW UTILITIES WOULD HELP NEW JERSEY FIGHT FLOODING AND POLLUTION

2018 will be one of the wettest years on record for the Garden State, and all that rain has resulted in frequent flooding, millions of dollars in damages, gridlocked traffic, impacted drinking water and polluted waterways.

The problem is daunting, but there is a solution. For decades, the state has provided comprehensive planning and regulations aimed at protecting the public from the flooding impacts of improperly and inadequately managed stormwater. These efforts have helped but failed to address all the social, economic and environmental impacts associated with stormwater runoff. Today, rather than continuing to use conventional “collect, detain and discharge” approaches to controlling runoff, the use of “green infrastructure” is proving to be a better alternative. It’s focused on reducing runoff at its source, through recharge, reuse and evapotranspiration, rather than just treating it as a “waste” or “nuisance” to get rid of as quickly as possible.

Green infrastructure measures include porous pavement, green roofs, rain barrels, rain gardens, bioretention basins and other techniques designed to capture rainwater and allow it to soak into the ground instead of concentrating and discharging it downstream. Additionally, the “green infrastructure” approach is far more attractive and provides ecological and community benefits that can’t be achieved with standard detention basins.

So, what’s the hold-up? The answer is the absence of a sustained source of local funding to implement and maintain new stormwater infrastructure, including green infrastructure, as well as to retrofit, upgrade or replace failing existing stormwater management facilities…

Click Here to Read the Complete Op/Ed

 

About the Op/Ed Authors: 

John A. Thonet, P.E., P.P., is the president of Thonet Associates, Inc, an environmental, planning and engineering consulting firm based in Pittstown, NJ.

Dr. Stephen J. Souza, PhD is the owner of Clean Waters Consulting, LLC, a water resource consulting firm based in Ringoes, NJ that provides consulting services to Princeton Hydro, of which Steve is one of the founding principals.

Conservation Spotlight: Reducing Flood Risk and Restoring Wetlands in Jamaica Bay

Located in Queens, New York on the northern shore of Jamaica Bay, Spring Creek South contains approximately 237 acres of undeveloped land, including wetlands and 2.4 miles of coastline. The site is bounded by the Howard Beach residential neighborhood in Queens, a commercial area along Cross Bay Boulevard, the Belt Parkway, and Jamaica Bay. The northwest section of Spring Creek South is part of the National Park Service’s Gateway National Recreation Area, and is largely comprised of small patches of degraded tidal marsh and disturbed and degraded upland ecosystems.

On October 29, 2012, Hurricane Sandy drove a catastrophic storm surge into the New Jersey and New York coastlines. Spring Creek South and the surrounding community of Howard Beach experienced record flooding and damage to property and critical infrastructure. Storm tides caused damage and erosion along the shoreline and in the salt marsh area, degrading important habitat and leaving the site vulnerable to invasive species.

Hurricane Sandy Aftermath at Howard Beach, taken 10/30/2012 by Pam Andrade

The New York State Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services (NYSDHSES) was awarded funding from FEMA’s Hazard Mitigation Grant Program to restore Spring Creek South. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) New York District, serving as project administrator, contracted Princeton Hydro to provide ecosystem restoration services. The goal of the project is to reduce future flood risk exposure while also protecting, restoring, and improving the quality and function of ecological systems; improving stormwater management and water quality; and enhancing the park’s visitor experience.

To achieve this goal, the project team is using an integrated approach that involves utilizing green infrastructure to create a natural barrier for the community and reduce the risks of coastal storms. Project activities include berm construction and the restoration of tidal marsh, creation of freshwater wetland forest, and creation of maritime shrub, forest, and grassland habitats, as well as stabilization of the existing shoreline.

On December 31, 2018, we completed Phase One of the project, which entails engineering design and preliminary permitting. More specifically, we’ve provided conceptual planning; analysis of subsurface soils for geotechnical properties and hazardous waste; coastal and freshwater wetland delineations; biological benchmarking analysis; and the development of sea level rise curves and two-dimensional hydrologic and hydraulic coastal modeling. As part of the hydrology study, we analyzed what the site could be expected to look like in 50 years due to climate changes and sea level rise. Our engineering design was also brought to 65% completion.

We also obtained permits, prepared the Environmental Assessment (EA), and oversaw the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process. The EA received a “Finding of No Significant Impact” (FONSI) from FEMA, which means the environmental analysis and interagency review concluded that the project has no significant impacts on the quality of the environment.

Due to the complex nature of this project and its location, we are coordinating with a variety of different entities, including the local Howard Beach Community Board, the FAA (proximity to JFK International Airport), Port Authority, USACE, NOAA Fisheries, USFWS, USEPA, NYSDEC, NYC DEP, the National Park Service, HDR Engineering and WSP Engineering.

Phase Two of the project is the construction phase, which is expected to take about two years to complete. A key part of the Spring Creek South construction activities is the restoration of approximately 40 acres of tidal marsh, which is anticipated to improve water quality locally by stabilizing sediment, reducing erosion, and filtering dissolved particulate materials. The project team will restore existing coastline areas and install a salt marsh along the shoreline. Planted with native flora, like Spartina alterniflora, a perennial deciduous grass found in intertidal wetlands, the coastal salt marsh will help to stabilize sediment. Additionally, removing invasive species like Phragmites australis from the area and replacing it with native plant species will increase the ability for native vegetation to colonize the site, improve vegetative diversity, and reduce fire risk in the park.

A forested wetland area and berm will also be created in order to provide the surrounding communities with natural shields and buffers to future storms. The berm, with an elevation of 19 feet (NAVD88), will help to manage the risk of storm surge flooding caused by coastal storms. The forested wetland area will also provide improved stormwater runoff storage, naturally filter stormwater, and, via flap gates, direct its flow toward Jamaica Bay, away from residential and commercial properties.

These measures will help to dissipate wind and wave energy, increase shoreline resilience, improve stormwater management at the site, and create habitat that increases the ecological value and biodiversity at the site, while providing resilience benefits. Restoration activities will benefit vulnerable and rare ecological communities by producing localized environmental enhancements, including improving water quality and creating and restoring habitat. The project also increases opportunities for recreational uses such as wildlife viewing/photography, fishing, and nature study.

Princeton Hydro specializes in the planning, design, permitting, implementing, and maintenance of wetland rehabilitation projects. To learn more about some of our ecosystem restoration and enhancement services, visit: bit.ly/PHwetland.

 

Winter Events Spotlight: Environmental Conferences & Classes

Over the coming months, Princeton Hydro is teaching courses and presenting at a variety of conferences that explore topics ranging from wetland restoration to cyanotoxins to dam removal:

 

January 2019 – May 2019: Temple University Wetland Ecology Course

Our Vice President Mark Gallagher, along with Founding Principal and Consultant Dr. Steve Souza, is teaching an applied wetland ecology graduate course at Temple University. The 17-week spring semester course, which includes weekly lectures as well as field trips, will provide students with an opportunity to study real-world examples of wetland and riparian restoration and the integration of wetland ecology and restoration design within the context of green infrastructure.

Students will gain an increased understanding of the ecological functions of wetland and riparian ecosystems; be introduced to the principles of applied ecology as related to wetland and riparian ecosystem restoration; learn about the application of wetland ecology in landscape restoration and enhancement projects; get hands-on experience with how to use green infrastructure techniques in urban and suburban settings to control and abate stormwater impacts; and learn about related state and federal rules and regulations.

LEARN MORE

 

January 2019 – May 2019: Delaware Valley University Watershed Management Course

Beginning January 22, Dr. Fred Lubnow, our Director of Aquatic Programs, is teaching a spring semester “Watershed Management” course at Delaware Valley University. Through hands-on laboratory exercises and engaging lectures, the course provides participants with the foundational skills needed to understand the concepts and terminology of hydrologic processes and watersheds. The concepts and processes include evapotranspiration, soil water, infiltration, runoff, and stream flow. Students will also develop skills in environmental awareness, ecological awareness, and land stewardship, which will help them understand the key processes involved in managing watershed resources sustainably.

LEARN MORE

 

January 27-30, 2019: Delaware Estuary Science and Environmental Summit, Cape May, NJ

Every two years, the Partnership for the Delaware Estuary holds a summit that focuses on developing practical solutions to challenges facing our tidal Delaware River and Bay. This year, the theme is Estuary 2029: Saving Our System Through Collaboration. Our Communications Strategist, Dana Patterson, is presenting “Strategic Science Communication & Stakeholder Engagement in the Delaware Estuary” during the Strategic Science Communication Session on Monday, January 28th. 

LEARN MORE

 

March 6-7, 2019: Pennsylvania Lake Management Society’s 29th Annual Conference

This two-day conference covers a wide range of topics such as invasive aquatic plant identification and eradication, harmful algal blooms (HABS), case studies of publicly funded projects and stewardship programs, management or remediation techniques, habitat or fishery improvement, and chemical application techniques. Core and category credits are available for professional chemical applicators for many of the presentations.  We’re proud to sponsor this conference year after year.  Dr. Fred Lubnow, Princeton Hydro’s Director of Aquatic Programs, is giving a presentation about utilizing a watershed implementation plan to address both the external and internal phosphorus loads for Lake Carey, Pennsylvania.  Come visit our booth and say hello to our Aquatics team members. BONUS: Every full conference registration also includes one free year of PALMS membership.

LEARN MORE

 

March 9, 2019: Watershed Congress Along the Schuylkill River

Hosted by the Delaware Riverkeeper Network, this conference is a highly anticipated event for people in the Schuylkill Watershed and beyond interested in understanding, protecting, and restoring their local streams and watersheds. Princeton Hydro is a proud sponsor and exhibitor of this conference. Come check out an hour-long, dynamic session on “Using Values-Driven Communication Strategies To Engage Your Watershed,” hosted by our Communications Strategist, Dana Patterson.

LEARN MORE

 

March 14, 2019: Land Ethics Symposium

Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve presents its 19th Annual Land Ethics Symposium. The conference, titled “Creative Approaches for Ecological Landscaping,” will focus on ways to create low-maintenance, economical and ecologically balanced landscapes using native plants and restoration techniques.

Participants can take part in presentations, for which continuing education credits are available, on topics, including Urban Restoration Ecology, Economic Ecology: Thinking Regionally & Working Together to Solve Water Resource Issues, and Wetland Restoration. The conference also offers a variety of networking events and an exhibitor hall. Princeton Hydro, a sponsor of the event, will have an exhibitor table. We hope to see you there!

LEARN MORE & REGISTER

 

March 22, 2019: The Pennsylvania Water Works Association’s Northeast District Spring Meeting

The PA-AWWA Northeast District and the Water Works Operators’ Association of Pennsylvania Eastern Section are hosting a Spring 2019 Meeting, which will cover a range of technical topics related to water resource management. Dr. Fred Lubnow is teaching a three-hour course on the monitoring and management of cyanotoxins in sources of raw water.

LEARN MORE

 

March 22, 2019: The Soil & Water Conservation Society (SWCS) Southern New England Chapter (SNEC) 2019 Annual Winter Conference

SWCSSNEC is a 501 (c) (3) organization whose purpose is to promote, educate and advance all phases of the science of conservation of soil, water, and all related resources. The Annual Winter Conference, themed “Going with the Flow”, offers a variety of presentations focused on topics related to stream continuity.

Director of our New England office Laura Wildman, PE, considered one of the foremost experts on barrier removal and alternative fish passage techniques, is giving a presentation titled “Dam Removal; When Less is More”. Other presentation topics include: environmental monitoring and unmanned aircraft systems (UAS)/drones; rehabilitation of aging structures to allow fish migration; and ecological disruption associated with road-stream crossings.

LEARN MORE & REGISTER

 

March 27, 2019: NEW JERSEY INVASIVE SPECIES STRIKE TEAM ANNUAL CONFERENCE

Presented by the Friends of Hopewell Valley Open Space, the Annual New Jersey Invasive Species Strike Team Conference is considered the most comprehensive state-wide forum on invasive species. The conference, being held at Duke Farms, brings participants together to collaborate and address new and emerging invasive species issues from a state-wide perspective, and includes an exhibitor hall, networking opportunities and a variety of presentations and panel discussions on topics, including river restoration, managing deer and invasive species to improve forest health, and meadow restoration tips.

Princeton Hydro, a proud sponsor of the conference, will be exhibiting and presenting. Mark Gallagher, Princeton Hydro Vice President, along with Jenn Rogers of Mercer County Park Commission, will present on the topic of freshwater tidal wetland at John A. Roebling Memorial Park in New Jersey. Mercer County Park Commission and Princeton Hydro worked together to reduce and control invasive, and restore the park’s Abbott Marshland. Read more about the project here: http://bit.ly/RoeblingMarshRestoration

LEARN MORE & REGISTER

 

March 30, 2019: Northwest New Jersey Rivers Conference

Free and open to the public, the Delaware River Watershed Initiative’s Northwest New Jersey Rivers Conference is an event focused around working together to protect the Delaware River, specifically related to the Highlands and Ridge & Valley regions of New Jersey. Presentation topics include river conservation and restoration, community outreach and education, sustainable agriculture and food waste reduction, and much more. Attendees will walk alway with tangible ideas for how to bring their communities together to defend and share the Delaware River and its precious resources.

The first workshop of the day is a panel discussion titled, “Environmental Commissions: The Why and How of Getting Started in Your Community”, at which Princeton Hydro’s Communication Strategist Dana Patterson will be fielding questions from the audience. We hope to see you there!

LEARN MORE & REGISTER

 

Also, Coming Up This Spring:
April 4-6, 2019: ATLANTIC ESTUARINE RESEARCH SOCIETY (AERS) SPRING MEETING

This year’s AERS Spring Meeting, titled “From the head of the tide to the edge of the shelf,” will emphasize the breath and spatial scale of estuaries and coasts. Participants will gather at George Mason University’s brand-new Potomac Science Center to hear a variety of presentations on topics ranging from freshwater tidal ecosystems to coastal oceans, and particularly the connections and exchange between these systems. Princeton Hydro’s Senior Aquatics Scientist Jack Szczepanski, PhD is presenting and exhibiting at the conference.

LEARN MORE

 

April 12, 2019: New Jersey Land Conservation Rally

Conservation Innovations in a Changing World is the theme this year for the 23rd Annual NJ Land Conservation Rally. We’re excited to sponsor this one-day educational conference about preserving open space and farmland in New Jersey. Start your morning off with a dynamic marketing session, “Nonprofit Storytelling A-Z: How to Transform Passive Clickers into Action Takers,” hosted by Princeton Hydro’s Communications Strategist, Dana Patterson and National Audubon Society‘s Mid-Level Giving Manager, Lindsay McNamara.  Check out a great afternoon session with our Aquatics Director, Dr. Fred Lubnow, and Senior Aquatic Scientist, Dr. Dr. Jack Szczepanski, who will offer tips on, “The Monitoring and Management of Cyanotoxins in Recreational Lakes and Managing Your Lake’s Fisheries.” And, don’t forget to say “hello” to all of our staff at our exhibitor booth during the conference.

LEARN MORE

 

April 12, 2019: Environmental Business Council of New England Meeting

Princeton Hydro recently joined as a business member of the Environmental Business Council (EBC) of New England, a nonprofit organization dedicated to enhancing business and job growth of both established and emerging environmental and energy businesses. EBC provides member companies with an array of programs, activities, and information to enable them to stay on the cutting edge of environmental and energy technologies, management and regulatory developments. At this EPC meeting, our Director of our New England office, Laura Wildman, PE, and Fluvial Geomorphologist, Paul Woodworth, are hosting a workshop for members on “Dam Removal and Sediment Management.”

LEARN MORE

STAY TUNED FOR MORE EVENT SPOTLIGHTS!

Employee Spotlight: Meet Our New Team Members

We’re excited to welcome four new members to our team. The addition of this group of talented individuals strengthens our commitment to delivering great service that exceeds our clients’ expectations.

Meet Our New Team Members
Miranda Lepek, EIT, Water Resource Engineer

Miranda is a civil engineer with expertise in grading and stormwater design, CAD drafting, environmental sampling, and construction oversight. Prior to Princeton Hydro, she worked for a small site development firm in Michigan where she developed her drafting skills and facilitated multiple aspects of private and commercial land development projects.

Miranda holds a B.S. in Civil Engineering from the University of Michigan – Ann Arbor. While on study abroad, she contributed to the one of the longest-running native amphibian field studies in New Zealand. In other previous experiences, she worked on major projects including the investigation phases of a Superfund site cleanup in Duluth, MN and a comprehensive sampling operation over 40 miles of the Hudson River near Albany, NY. In her free time, Miranda enjoys hiking, foraging, cooking and art.

Sumantha Prasad, PE, ENV SP, Water Resource Engineer

Sumantha is a Water Resource Engineer with a B.S. in Bioenvironmental Engineering from Rutgers University and a M.S. in Environmental Engineering and Science from Johns Hopkins University. She worked in Maryland for seven years focusing on ecological restoration projects, including stream restoration, wetland creation and enhancement, and stormwater management, and she worked for 3 years with a primary focus on highway hydrology and hydraulics.

In her spare time, she enjoys being a Toastmaster and serves as the Treasurer to a 501(c)3 organization dedicated to creating inclusive housing communities for adults with disabilities. She also enjoys telling terrible puns unapologetically.

Pat Rose, Environmental Scientist

Pat’s interest in aquatics began during a summer course studying at Lake Atitlán, Guatemala as an undergraduate at SUNY Oneonta. After graduation, he spent a year volunteering with AmeriCorps in Knoxville, Tennessee as part of a Water Quality Team. While in Tennessee, Pat spent the majority of his time educating high school students on how to protect and improve local waterways and watersheds as part of the Adopt-A-Watershed program. During his year with AmeriCorps, Pat worked with government organizations to perform biological sampling and erosion monitoring in local streams.

Pat graduated from SUNY Oneonta with a M.S. in Lake Management in December 2018. During his time in graduate school, he created an interim lake management plan for a small reservoir in New York that has had cyanobacterial blooms over the past few years. Pat spent this past summer completing a co-op with an aquatic plant management company in the Pacific Northwest, working primarily with invasive Eurasian and hybrid watermilfoil populations.

Duncan Simpson, Senior Environmental Scientist

For nearly a decade, Duncan has served as an Environmental Scientist/Planner in the Mid-Atlantic Region. His experience includes a wide range of natural resource studies, documentation, and permitting at both the project and program level. He has special expertise in wetlands; Waters of the US delineations; and permitting for stormwater management facilities, stream restoration, and TMDL program projects. He has conducted forest stand delineations; rare, threatened and endangered species consultations; mitigation monitoring; and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation.

Duncan holds an M.S in Biology from Towson University and a B.S. in Environmental Science with a Wildlife and Fisheries Conservation Minor from the University of Massachusetts. During his graduate studies, he researched amphibian species found in Delmarva Bays and testing models that predict their presence based on abiotic habitat characteristics. He also served as a student member of the Northeast Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation (NEPARC) steering committee. Duncan is a Professional Wetland Scientist and member of the Society of Wetland Scientists. In his spare time, he enjoys hiking with his dog and learning how to fly fish.

 

Employee Spotlight: Helping Communities Around the World Access Water Resources

We’re Proud to Put the Spotlight on Natalie Rodrigues, Staff Engineer And Engineers Without Borders Co-President

As a staff engineer specializing in water resources, Natalie Rodrigues, EIT, CPESC-IT works on a wide range of projects from stormwater management to ecosystem restoration to dam safety. Outside of the office, Natalie is an active volunteer with Engineers Without Borders (EWB), a nonprofit organization that works to build a better world through engineering projects that aid communities in meeting their basic needs.

EWB volunteers work with communities in the U.S. and throughout the world to find appropriate solutions for their infrastructure needs, including clean water supply; sanitation; sustainable energy; structures like bridges and buildings; and various agriculture essentials from irrigation systems to harvest processing.  Natalie began volunteering for the organization six years ago while attending college at the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry where she earned her Bachelor of Science in Environmental Resources Engineering with a focus in water resources.

Natalie and Lola, a student from the elementary school in Guatemala where Natalie assisted on an EWB project to install a latrine system

Her first big volunteer project, which was done in collaboration with EWB’s Syracuse Professionals Chapter, was designing and building a system of composting latrines for an elementary school in the small town of Las Majadas, Guatemala. Natalie provided assistance on several aspects of the project, including working on a Health and Safety Plan. The completion of this project helped to prevent the spread of disease, as well as treat waste without the need for a constant water supply/sewer system. The long-lasting design also increases the health practices and hygiene of the community, creating a safer place for education.

Natalie also served as secretary of the university’s EWB chapter for two years, then became the Regional Administrator for the Northeast Regional Committee, and is now starting her third year as a Co-President of the region.

In her current role with the regional committee, Natalie helps to provide resources for members and facilitates communication between EWB Headquarters and individual chapters. She assists with various mini-conferences and workshops throughout the region and provides opportunities for members to obtain Professional Development Hours and certifications. She is also a part of the EWB’s Diversity and Inclusion Task Force and the Council of Regional Presidents.

Natalie stands with her 2018 Northeast Regional Committee members at the 2018 National Conference

We’re so proud to have Natalie on our team and truly value the work she does inside and outside the office.

*FREE* Download: Using Flood Models to Mitigate Flood Risk

Back in September, NEIWPCC offered a free research webinar on modeling and flood mitigation recommendations for a forested and urban Hudson River tributary watershed. The webinar looked at the Moodna Creek Watershed and Flood Mitigation Assessment and described how flood models were used to inform recommendations for reducing and mitigating existing and anticipated flood risk. This free webinar was hosted by our Environmental Scientist & GIS Manager, Christiana Pollack, GISP, CFM, and Jessica Jahre, CFM, AICP, a Planner with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection.

Pollack and Jahre, authors of the assessment, described how they used flood models to inform recommendations for reducing and mitigating existing/anticipated flood risk in the Moodna Creek Watershed. The flood mitigation assessment was conducted by Princeton Hydro and GreenVest, and funded by NEIWPCC through the New York Department of Environmental Conservation’s Hudson River Estuary Program.

If you missed the webinar, but are still interested in flood mitigation and this study, you can download a PDF of the Powerpoint below. With informative graphics and intriguing photos, this presentation will introduce you to flood mitigation strategies and techniques for many different needs.Princeton Hydro specializes in flood planning, policy, analysis, design and risk mitigation services.  To learn more our floodplain management services, visit: bit.ly/floodmanagement

Efforts to Manage Hydrilla in Harveys Lake Prove Difficult but Effective

Collaboration between state agencies and local organizations in Luzerne County bring in grant money to determine Hydrilla infestation levels in Harveys Lake. Treatment efforts are scheduled for 2019.

Story provided by Princeton Hydro Senior Limnologist Michael Hartshorne, and originally published in the Pennsylvania iMapInvasives Fall 2018 Newsletter

Hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata)

Hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata) is a relatively new invasive plant in Pennsylvania with the first documented occurrence in 1989 in Adams County. Still, it was not until recently that lake managers, park rangers, and others in the natural resource field have turned their attention to this aggressive invader. Looking incredibly similar to our native waterweed (Elodea canadensis), hydrilla differs in that it is comprised of 4-8 whorled, toothed leaves in contrast to the smooth edged, 3-leaved whorl of E. canadensis.

 

Harveys Lake, located in the Borough of Harveys Lake (Luzerne County) is a large, deep glacial lake with limited littoral (i.e., shoreline) habitat. A significant body of work has been conducted at the lake with the original Phase I: Diagnostic-Feasibility Lake study conducted in 1992 and a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) issued for phosphorus in 2002.

From 2002 to present, Princeton Hydro has assisted the Borough in the restoration of the lake with a heavy focus on stormwater best management practices (BMPs) supplemented by routine, in-lake water quality monitoring. The goal of the storm water/watershed-based efforts was to reduce the lake’s existing, annual total Hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata) phosphorus load so it’s in full compliance with the established TMDL.

Mapped locations noted in 2014 and 2015 of hydrilla in Harveys Lake as documented in the Pennsylvania iMapInvasives database.

Over the last 15 years, the installation of these watershed-based projects has led to improved water quality conditions; specifically, phosphorus and algae concentrations have been reduced. While water quality conditions improved Harveys Lake, it was during one of the routine, summer water quality monitoring events conducted in July 2014 that a dense stand of hydrilla was noted at the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission’s public boat launch. More than likely, the plant entered the lake as a “hitchhiker” on the boat or trailer being launched from this public boat launch by someone visiting the lake.

Hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata) Credit: Nick Decker, DCNR Bureau of State Parks

Since the initial identification and confirmation of the hydrilla, the Borough of Harveys Lake has worked in conjunction with the Harveys Lake Environmental Advisory Council, the Luzerne County Conservation District, the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, and Princeton Hydro to secure funding for additional surveys to determine the spatial extent and density of growth followed by an aggressive eradication plan.

Grant funds already allocated to Harveys Lake under the state’s Non-Point Source Pollution Program were used to conduct a detailed boat-based and diving aquatic plant survey of Harveys Lake to delineate the distribution and relative abundance of the hydrilla in 2014. During these surveys, the distribution of the hydrilla was found to be limited to the northern portion of the lake with the heaviest densities just off the boat launch with plants observed growing in waters 20-25 feet deep.

A follow-up survey had shown hydrilla coverage to increase from 38% of surveyed sites to 58% of sites in 2016 with hydrilla now present at the lake’s outlet area. Spatial coverage of hydrilla increased from approximately 50 acres in 2014 to 210 acres in 2016, an increase of 160 acres.

This map shows the 2018 proposed treatment area of Harvey’s Lake. Due to funding issues, treatment is now scheduled for 2019. The current hydrilla distribution encompasses the entire littoral zone of Harvey’s Lake.

In hopes of preventing hydrilla escaping into the lake’s outlet stream, the Borough of Harveys Lake funded an emergency treatment of the two-acre outlet area in 2016 utilizing the systemic herbicide Sonar® (Fluridone). A follow-up treatment of 159 acres was conducted in 2017, again utilizing the Fluridone-based systemic herbicide.

The next treatment, which will attempt to cover the majority of the littoral habitat covered by hydrilla, is scheduled for late spring/early summer of 2019. It should be noted that Sonar® is being applied at a low concentration that is effective at eradicating the hydrilla, but will not negatively impact desirable native plant species.

The treatments conducted to date have documented some reductions in the vegetative coverage of hydrilla as well as tuber production relative to the original plant surveys conducted in 2016. However, it is recognized that it will take multiple years of treatment to eradicate this nuisance plant from the lake, as well as a highly proactive, interactive program to educate residents as well as visitors to the lake in preventing the re-introduction of this or other invasive species to Harveys Lake.

 

The successful, long-term improvement of a lake or pond requires a proactive management approach that addresses the beyond simply reacting to weed and algae growth and other symptoms of eutrophication. Our staff can design and implement holistic, ecologically-sound solutions for the most difficult weed and algae challenges. Visit our website to learn more about Princeton Hydro’s lake management services: http://bit.ly/pondlake

Michael Hartshorne‘s  primary areas of expertise include lake and stream diagnostic studies, TMDL development, watershed management, and small pond management and lake restoration. He is particularly skilled in all facets of water quality characterization, from field data collection to subsequent statistical analysis, modeling, technical reporting, and the selection and implementation of best management practices. He has extensive experience in utilizing water quality data in concert with statistical and modeling packages to support load reduction allocations for the achievement of water quality standards or tailored thresholds set forth to reduce the rate of cultural eutrophication. He also has significant experience in conducting detailed macrophyte, fishery, and benthic surveys.

Mitigation Milestone Reached at Mattawoman Creek Mitigation Site

Photo courtesy of GreenVest

Mattawoman Creek Mitigation Project will Restore and Protect 80+ Acres of Mattawoman Creek, Chesapeake Bay’s Most Productive Tributary

As one of the Chesapeake Bay’s most productive tributaries and a vital part of Maryland’s natural resources, Mattawoman Creek supports some of the largest populations of finfish, amphibians, and birds in the state. A collaborative team of private and public sector entities have designed the “Mattawoman Creek Mitigation Site” in Pomfret, Charles County, Maryland, an effort that will enhance or create 64+ acres of wetlands and restore nearly 3,800 linear feet of this perennial stream.  With over 28,500 native trees and shrubs to be planted, this mitigation project will result in 80+ acres of continuous, forested wetland with complex and diverse vegetative communities. It is expected to provide a wide array of habitat to resident and transient wildlife, including birds, reptiles, invertebrates, amphibians and rare, threatened and endangered species.

Unique to this project, Mattawoman Creek Mitigation Site is Maryland’s first-ever Umbrella Mitigation Banking Instrument (UMBI) for federal and other government agency use.   A UMBI is the bundling of multiple mitigation banks into one agreement in order to streamline the regulatory approval process, thereby eliminating steps and involving fewer resources. The Maryland UMBI document helps the USAF and other public agencies secure certainty of cost and schedule, facilitate timely permit issuance, and expedite the satisfaction of their permitted requirements for planned capital improvement projects. This approach also maximizes the scale of restoration and resulting land protection and efforts, creating contiguous blocks of habitat with greatly enhanced benefits compared to single, permittee-responsible projects. This precedent was a result of a partnership between United States Air Force (USAF) and Joint Base Andrews (JBA), U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE), GreenTrust Alliance, GreenVest, and Princeton Hydro.

Projects completed under the UMBI will reduce federal and state workload expediting the regulatory review and issuance of permits by the MDE and USACE. Additionally, projects completed under this UMBI will aid in compliance with the Federal Paperwork Reduction Act where federal regulatory staff can evaluate success and performance issues for multiple permittees at one single habitat restoration or mitigation site. In addition, federal costs are capped, and liabilities  are transferred through to GreenVest, the private sector operator, and GreenTrust Alliance, the nonprofit bank sponsor, who will also serve as the long-term steward of sites restored under this program.

Pictured is the southern restoration area after
sorghum germination, prior to wetland creation
and reestablishment.
A function-based stream assessment was
performed on the degraded channel.

 

Photo courtesy of GreenVestDesign, engineering/modeling, and permitting of the site was completed by  Princeton Hydro and GreenVest under our currently Ecosystem Restoration contract with the USACE. Princeton Hydro also provided an Environmental Assessment and Environmental Baseline Survey, and conducted a geotechnical investigation, which included the advancement of test pits, visual and manual investigation techniques and logging, infiltration testing, laboratory soils testing, and seasonal high-water table estimations.

A wetland water budget was also developed for the proposed wetland creation and restoration to determine if sufficient water is available to establish or reestablish wetlands on the site. It was also used to inform design development including proposed grading and plant community composition. The establishment and re-establishment of wetlands on the site will be accomplished through directed grading, ditch plugging and stream restoration designed to maximize the retention of surface water, floodplain re-connection, and groundwater inputs.

Highlights from the Mattawoman Creek Wetland and Stream Mitigation project:
  • 80 acres of land were placed into conservation easement and removed from active row crop production and cattle pasture. The easement, which is held by GreenTrust Alliance, provides permanent protection for all 80 acres.
  • Over 64 acres of wetlands will be restored, created, enhanced or preserved, which will sequester approximately 75 tons of carbon per year.
  • 3,798 linear feet of perennial stream will be restored by re-establishing, historic floodplain access during more frequent storm events, stabilizing hydraulics and geomorphology, and adding aquatic habitat value.
  • Full integration of the wetland and stream restoration elements will occur exponentially, increasing anticipated functions and values in the post construction condition. Functions include: storm damage and flood attenuation, groundwater recharge and discharge, nutrient cycling and sequestration, local water quality improvement, and wildlife habitat enhancements.
  • This project will also create and enhance the forested wetland and stream habitat for the State-listed Threatened Selys’ Sundragon (Helocordulia selysii).
  • As part of the site design, over 28,500 native trees and shrubs will be planted.
  • The Mattawoman Creek Mitigation Site is located within a Tier 3 Biodiversity Conservation Network area. These areas are classified by the Department of Natural Resources as “highly significant for biodiversity conservation” and are priority conservation areas that support critical species and habitats.
  • The project will yield advanced mitigation values: 7.913 in wetland credits and 1,595 in stream credits. These credits are durable and will be available for JBA’s use in order to satisfy permitted impacts associated with planned capital improvement projects.

Over 6,000 acres (25%) of the Mattawoman Creek watershed has been protected by public ownership and various conservation and agricultural easements, which, in addition to the Mattawoman Creek Mitigation Site, help ensure that Mattawoman Creek forever remains a high-quality destination for outdoor recreation.

Princeton Hydro specializes in the planning, design, permitting, implementing, and maintenance of tidal and freshwater wetland rehabilitation projects. To learn more about our wetland restoration, creation, and enhancement services, visit: http://bit.ly/PHwetland