“2018 Land Ethics Award of Merit” awarded to Mullica River Wetland Mitigation Project

At the 18th Annual Land Ethics Symposium, which is presented by Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve, Princeton Hydro and GreenVest, LLC were honored with the “2018 Land Ethics Award of Merit” for our restoration work at the Mullica River Wetland Mitigation Site.

We teamed up to restore the natural wetland hydrology on a 34-acre parcel of land which was heavily impaired and intensely manipulated for cranberry production over the last century. The area was home to a network of earthen berms surrounding cranberry cultivating bogs, where water onsite was managed through a series of ditches and water control structures set into the berms. The cranberry operation was bordered mostly by an Atlantic white cedar dominated swamp.

“Thank you to Bowman’s Hill for honoring this successful wetland restoration project,” said Mark Gallagher, Vice President of Princeton Hydro. “Through our partnership with GreenVest, we transformed a degraded cranberry bog into thriving emergent and forested wetlands, and restored historic headwater stream channels. These restored wetlands are providing invaluable habitat to a variety of threatened and endangered species in New Jersey, including the Pine Barrens Treefrog and Barred Owl.” 

 

While this site was degraded, it still contained four state listed species, including the state-endangered Timber Rattlesnake and the Pine Barrens Tree Frog, making it a priority site for restoration. The presence of these species influenced the design as it included provisions to incorporate habitat elements for these species.

Through the implementation of restoration activities focused on removing the site’s agricultural infrastructure, Princeton Hydro and GreenVest were able to restore a natural wetland system on the site. In addition, the restoration project reconnected the site to its floodplain and re-established a natural stream channel. The expansive, flat and wide floodplain wetland complex of the Alquatka Branch of the Mullica RIver provides floodplain connectivity for relatively frequent storm events and allows for a sustainable floodplain wetland complex in the former cranberry bog cells.

The completed project incorporated a balance of both ecological and human health and safety benefits. Additionally, the project involved innovative restoration techniques that required building consensus among local watershed protection groups and state and regional regulators, including New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and the New Jersey Pinelands Commission. In the end, the project restored 34 acres of a highly functioning forested wetland/upland complex and reestablished 1,600+ linear feet of historic headwater stream channels.

Princeton Hydro would like to thank Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve for both the award and for a organizing another successful Land Ethics Symposium. The conference focused on ways to create low-maintenance, economical and ecologically balanced landscapes using native plants and restoration techniques. Princeton Hydro was a proud “Friends Sponsor” of the event.

 

This Month’s Events: March Update from Princeton Hydro

Princeton Hydro is proud to participate in a number of exciting conferences throughout March. The conferences, which take place in Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Virginia, cover a wide variety of topics centered around protecting water resources.

March 2: New Jersey Conservation Rally

The 22nd Annual NJ Land Conservation Rally is a one-day educational conference about preserving open space and farmland in New Jersey. The event consists of training workshops, roundtable discussions, a keynote speech from David Case, author of “Nature of Americans,” exhibitors, and a farmers market.

Princeton Hydro, a proud sponsor of the rally, is giving two presentations:
  • “Recognizing The Power of Dam Removal To Reconnect & Restore Our Ecosystem”
    The Nature Conservancy ’s River Restoration Manager Beth Styler Barry and Princeton Hydro’sDirector of Engineering Services Mary Paist-Goldman , P.E. will present the most effective ways to approach a comprehensive, all-inclusive dam removal in New Jersey, with particular emphasis on the Musconetcong Watershed.
  • “Nonprofit Social Media Hacks”
    Rally Planning Committee member Lindsay McNamara and Communication Strategist for Princeton Hydro Dana Patterson present ways to punch up your social media presence. The course is designed for social media beginners and experts alike, and will cover cross-channel techniques to help increase engagement, event attendance, and social buzz around your organization.

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March 4 – 6: Virginia Water Conference

Held by the Virginia Lakes and Watershed Associationand the Virginia Floodplain Management Association, the Virginia Water Conference will host 400 participants, and will include exhibits and breakout sessions on topics ranging from floodplain management to dam safety to water resource engineering.

Princeton Hydro’s Dr. Fred Lubnow, Director of Aquatic Programs, and Michael Hartshorne, Senior Limnologist, are conducting a Water Quality and Quantity breakout session titled,  “A Limnological Assessment of a 250-Acre Impoundment in Virginia for the Consideration of Nutrient Inactivation.”

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March 7 – 8: PA Lake Management Society Conference

The Pennsylvania Lake Management Society is hosting its 28th annual conference during which lake professionals, students, recreation enthusiasts, lakeside residents and community members will come together to explore a variety of topics related to managing lakes and reservoirs. Visit the Princeton Hydro booth to discuss the latest advancements in pond, lake and watershed management.

The conference offers a collection of professional presentations, workshops and panel discussions. Princeton Hydro is giving two presentations during the conference:

  • “Continued Management of Hydrilla in Harveys Lake, Luzerne County, Pennsylvania”
    Lead by Michael Hartshorne, Senior Limnologist, and Scott Churm, Associate: Director of Aquatic Operations
  • “Conducting a Nutrient Inactivation Treatment for Internal Phosphorus Load Control for a Small Glacial Lake in Northern Pennsylvania”
    Lead by Dr. Fred Lubnow, Director of Aquatics Programs

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March 10: Schuylkill Watershed Congress

The Watershed Congress is an annual event that seeks to advance the best available information and techniques for protecting and restoring watersheds by combining science, policy, and practical applications into one program.

The one-day conference offers a keynote discussion on Landscape-Scale Forest Loss in the Delaware Basin, 21 concurrent sessions covering a broad range of watershed topics, poster sessions and exhibits. Dr. Fred Lubnow‘s breakout session, titled “Ecology/Management of Cyanotoxin Producing Blue-Green Algae in the Schuylkill River,” reviews the basic ecology of nuisance blue-green algae and how to monitor, manage and prevent cyanotoxins particularly in potable water supplies.

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March 15: Land Ethics Symposium

The theme for this year’s 18th Annual Land Ethics Symposium, which is presented by Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve, is “Creative Approaches for Ecological Landscaping.” The conference will focus on ways to create low-maintenance, economical and ecologically balanced landscapes using native plants and restoration techniques.

Participants can take part in presentations, for which continuing education credits are available, on topics, including Installation and Management of Stormwater Basins, Landscaping for Carbon Storage and Resilience, and Watershed Restoration. The conference also offers a variety of networking events and an exhibitor hall. Princeton Hydro, a “Friends Sponsor” of the event, will have an exhibitor table. We hope to see you there!

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March 19: SAME Philadelphia Post Small Business Conference

The Philadelphia Post is hosting its 12th Annual Small Business Conference and Industry Day, which aims to promote engagement between agency, industry, and small businesses. The program consists of networking events, small business exhibits, a variety of speakers and much more.

The Society of American Military Engineers (SAME) gives leaders from the A/E/C, environmental, and facility management industries the opportunity to come together with federal agencies in order to showcase best practices and highlight future opportunities for small businesses to work in the federal market. If you’re in attendance, please stop by the Princeton Hydro booth.

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Conservation Spotlight: FORTESCUE SALT MARSH AND AVALON TIDAL MARSH RESTORATION

HABITAT RESTORATION THROUGH APPLICATION OF DREDGED MATERIAL

New Jersey, like other coastal states, has been losing coastal wetland habitats to a combination of subsidence, erosion and sea level rise. The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection received a grant from the National Fish and Wildlife Federation to address this issue and rejuvenate these critical habitats. Grantees were charged with providing increased resilience to natural infrastructure that will in turn increase the resiliency of coastal communities in the face of future storms like Hurricane Sandy.

As a consultant for GreenTrust Alliance, a land conservancy holding company, Princeton Hydro worked with several project partners, including NJDEP, the US Army Corps of Engineers, NJDOT, The Wetlands Institute, and The Nature Conservancy, to increase the marsh elevation to an optimal range where vegetation, and the wildlife that depends on it, can flourish. One of the techniques used for this project included the use of dredged material disposal placement, which involves using recycled sand and salt dredged from navigation channels to boost the elevation of the degraded marsh.

A media statement from NJDEP further explained the process, “sediments dredged from navigation channels and other areas are pumped onto eroding wetlands to raise their elevations enough to allow native marsh grasses to flourish or to create nesting habitats needed by some rare wildlife species. Healthy marshes with thick mats of native grasses can cushion the impact of storm surges, thereby reducing property damage.”

FORTESCUE SALT MARSH

The salt marsh at the Fortescue project site is part of the Fortescue Wildlife Management Area. The specific goal of the project was to restore and enhance the interior high and low marsh, coastal dune and beach habitats.

To achieve these habitat enhancements, the Princeton Hydro project team first established biological benchmarks of each targeted habitat type and evaluated them to determine the upper and lower elevational tolerances for target communities and plant species. Approximately 33,300 cubic yards of dredged materials were used to restore a degraded salt marsh, restore an eroded dune, and replenish Fortescue Beach. The eroded dune was replaced with a dune designed to meet target flood elevations and protect the marsh behind it against future damage. The dune was constructed using dredged sand, and, to prevent sediment from entering the waterways, a Filtrexx containment material was used.

AVALON TIDAL MARSH

This project site is a tidal marsh complex located within a back-bay estuary proximal to Stone Harbor and Avalon. Princeton Hydro and project partners aimed to enhance the marsh in order to achieve the primary goal of restoring the natural function of the tidal marsh complex.

Two main activities were conducted in order to apply the dredged material to the impaired marsh plain: 1.) the placement of a thin layer of material over targeted areas of existing salt marsh to increase marsh elevations, 2.) the concentrated placement of material to fill expanding pools by elevating the substrate to the same elevation as the adjacent marsh. In total, dredged material was distributed among eight distinct placement areas throughout the property’s 51.2 acres.

These coastal wetland restoration activities will help to prevent the subsidence-based marsh loss by filling isolated pockets of open water and increasing marsh platform elevation. In addition, the beneficial reuse of dredged material facilitates routine and post-storm dredging and improves the navigability of waterways throughout the U.S.