Employee Spotlight: Helping Communities Around the World Access Water Resources

We’re Proud to Put the Spotlight on Natalie Rodrigues, Staff Engineer And Engineers Without Borders Co-President

As a staff engineer specializing in water resources, Natalie Rodrigues, EIT, CPESC-IT works on a wide range of projects from stormwater management to ecosystem restoration to dam safety. Outside of the office, Natalie is an active volunteer with Engineers Without Borders (EWB), a nonprofit organization that works to build a better world through engineering projects that aid communities in meeting their basic needs.

EWB volunteers work with communities in the U.S. and throughout the world to find appropriate solutions for their infrastructure needs, including clean water supply; sanitation; sustainable energy; structures like bridges and buildings; and various agriculture essentials from irrigation systems to harvest processing.  Natalie began volunteering for the organization six years ago while attending college at the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry where she earned her Bachelor of Science in Environmental Resources Engineering with a focus in water resources.

Natalie and Lola, a student from the elementary school in Guatemala where Natalie assisted on an EWB project to install a latrine system

Her first big volunteer project, which was done in collaboration with EWB’s Syracuse Professionals Chapter, was designing and building a system of composting latrines for an elementary school in the small town of Las Majadas, Guatemala. Natalie provided assistance on several aspects of the project, including working on a Health and Safety Plan. The completion of this project helped to prevent the spread of disease, as well as treat waste without the need for a constant water supply/sewer system. The long-lasting design also increases the health practices and hygiene of the community, creating a safer place for education.

Natalie also served as secretary of the university’s EWB chapter for two years, then became the Regional Administrator for the Northeast Regional Committee, and is now starting her third year as a Co-President of the region.

In her current role with the regional committee, Natalie helps to provide resources for members and facilitates communication between EWB Headquarters and individual chapters. She assists with various mini-conferences and workshops throughout the region and provides opportunities for members to obtain Professional Development Hours and certifications. She is also a part of the EWB’s Diversity and Inclusion Task Force and the Council of Regional Presidents.

Natalie stands with her 2018 Northeast Regional Committee members at the 2018 National Conference

We’re so proud to have Natalie on our team and truly value the work she does inside and outside the office.

This entry was posted in Company News, Engineering, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , by phadmin. Bookmark the permalink.

About phadmin

Princeton Hydro was formed in 1998 with the specific mission of providing integrated ecological and engineering consulting services. Offering expertise in aquatic and terrestrial ecology, water resources engineering, and geotechnical investigations, our staff provides a full suite of environmental services. Our team has the skill sets necessary to conduct highly comprehensive assessments; develop and design appropriate, sustainable solutions; and successfully bring those solutions to fruition. As such, our ecological investigations are backed by detailed engineering analyses, and our engineering solutions fully account for the ecological and environmental attributes and features of the project site. We take great pride in our reputation with both clients and regulators for producing high-quality projects over a wide variety of service areas; doing so requires a highly skilled team committed to keeping abreast with current research, technology and regulations. Our capabilities are reflected in our award-winning projects that consistently produce real-world, cost-effective solutions for even the most complex environmental problems.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *