Wetland Restoration Project Wins “Land Ethics” Award of Merit

The Pin Oak Forest Conservation Area, located in a heavily developed area of northern Middlesex County, New Jersey, once suffered from wetland and stream channel degradation, habitat fragmentation, decreased biodiversity due to invasive species, and ecological impairment. The site was viewed as one of only a few large-scale freshwater wetland restoration opportunities remaining in this region of New Jersey. Thus, a dynamic partnership between government agencies, NGOs, and private industry, was formed to steward the property back to life and restore its natural function. Today, at Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve’s 19th Annual Land Ethics Symposium, Middlesex County and the project team were presented with the “Land Ethics Award of Merit” for its remarkable restoration achievements.

“In just a few years, the landscape at Pin Oak has transformed from a degraded, disconnected wetland to a healthy, high-functioning landscape,” said Mark Gallagher, Vice President of Princeton Hydro. “This restoration project exemplifies how a diverse group of public and private entities can work together to identify opportunities, overcome challenges and achieve tremendous success.”

The Pin Oak restoration team includes Middlesex County Office of Parks and Recreation, Woodbridge Township, Woodbridge River Watch, New Jersey Freshwater Wetlands Mitigation Council, GreenTrust Alliance, GreenVest, and Princeton Hydro.

The Pin Oak Forest Conservation Area is a 97-acre tract of open space that contains a large wetland complex at the headwaters of Woodbridge Creek. In 2017, the award-winning restoration project converted over 30 acres of degraded freshwater wetlands, streams and disturbed uplands dominated by invasive species into a species-rich and highly functional headwater wetland complex. The resulting ecosystem provides valuable habitat for wildlife and a nurturing environment for native plants such as pin oak, swamp white oak, marsh hibiscus, and swamp rose. The restored headwater wetland system provides stormwater management, floodplain storage, enhanced groundwater recharge onsite, and surface water flows to Woodbridge Creek, as well as public hiking trails, all benefiting the town of Woodbridge.

The Land Ethics Award recognizes the creative use of native plants in the landscape, sustainable and regenerative design, and ethical land management and construction practices. The recipient is selected by a jury of professionals in the field of design, preservation and conservation, and the award is presented at the Annual Symposium.

Photo courtesy of Barbara Storms, Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve.

In addition to the Award of Merit, Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve’s honored Dr. Marion Kyde with the 2019 Land Ethics Director’s Award and Doylestown Township Environmental Advisory Council with the 2019 Land Ethics Award. Congratulations to all of the winners!

Established in 1934, Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve is a 134-acre nature preserve, botanical garden, and accredited museum working to inspire the appreciation and use of native plants by serving as a sanctuary and educational resource for conservation and stewardship. For more information, visit www.bhwp.org.

Read more about the Pin Oak Forest Restoration project:

Innovative and Effective Approach to Wetland Restoration

To learn more about Princeton Hydro’s wetland restoration services and recent projects, visit us here: http://bit.ly/PHwetland

 

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