New York Hosts Harmful Algal Blooms Summit

Photo: Veronica Volk, Great Lakes Today

Photo credit: Veronica Volk, Great Lakes Today

The Western New York Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) Summit, the last of four Statewide HABs summits, was held last month in Rochester, NY. The summits kicked off Governor Cuomo’s $65 million initiative to protect the NY State’s lakes, ponds and reservoirs, and those that rely on these waterbodies for recreation and drinking water, from the ecological and health impacts associated with HABs.

“Protecting New York’s natural resources is key to ensuring residents have access to safe water, and through this collaborative summit, we are addressing the growing threat of harmful algal blooms,” said Governor Cuomo in a recent press release.

Tim Schneider, Owasco Lake Watershed Inspection Program

Photo: Tim Schneider, Owasco Lake Watershed Inspection Program

Each regional summit involved a day-long session of expert presentations and panel discussions on a variety of HAB related topics, and culminated in an evening session, which was open to the public and provided community members an opportunity to learn more about the Governor’s initiative and pose questions to NYSDEC about HABs and the management of HABs. The evening sessions were available to view via a live online stream as well.

For each summit, the Governor invited regional experts to participate along with NYSDEC and Department of Health experts. The experts were brought together to initiate the development of tailored HAB action plans. Although the focus was placed on the management of Governor Cuomo’s 12 priority waterbodies, the goal was to identify HAB management plans applicable for all of the State’s waterbodies, large or small. The discussions that evolved through the four summits set the stage to inform decisions related to preventing and properly responding to HABs across the state.

Participating by the invitation of Governor Cuomo and the NYSDEC in last month’s Western New York Summit were:

  • Dr. Steve Souza, Princeton Hydro
  • Art DeGaetano, Cornell University
  • Christopher Gobler, SUNY Stony Brook
  • Dave Matthews, Upstate Freshwater Institute
  • Greg Boyer, SUNY ESF
  • Nelson Hairston, Cornell University
  • Sally Flis, The Fertilizer Institute
  • Tim Davis, Bowling Greene State University, Ohio

During the Western New York Summit, Dr. Souza, Princeton Hydro co-founder, provided insight on the causes of HABs and, in particular, discussed the management techniques that have been successfully implemented by Princeton Hydro to combat the onset and mitigate the impacts of HABs.

About Governor Cuomo’s Harmful Algal Blooms program:
Governor Cuomo’s program builds on New York’s $2.5 billion Clean Water Infrastructure Act investments in clean water infrastructure and water quality protection. The Harmful Algal Blooms initiative is supported with funds from both the Clean Water Infrastructure Act and the $300 million Environmental Protection Fund. Through the Governor’s leadership, New York has developed the most comprehensive HABs outreach and monitoring programs in the country, led by DEC sampling of ambient waters across the state and DOH sampling at regulated beaches and public water systems.

2 thoughts on “New York Hosts Harmful Algal Blooms Summit

    • Patrick you are correct to be concerned. Although the judicious use of copper based algaecides can be part of your lake management “tool box”, excessive use of these algaecides or reliance on them as the primary management tool is a mistake and can actually worsen lake water quality (both short term and long term) and increase the occurrence of cyanobacteria blooms.

      Ultimately a lake management plan focused on controlling algae blooms needs to focus on nutrient management…simply put the less “food”, the less algae. So anything that can be done to decrease phosphorus and nitrogen loading to a lake is very important.

      Other solutions will be largely dictated by specific lake conditions but include aeration, floating wetland islands, barely straw, and certain types of nutrient inactivants. And there are also the peroxide based algaecides that do not have a copper residual. The selection of a specific option or group of options should be guided by data; never a good idea to just give something a try. Also keep in mind regulations differ state-to-state, so the implementation of some of these management techniques may require a permit.

      Please don’t hesitate to reach out to me and the Princeton Hydro team with any questions or comments.

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