Princeton Hydro’s Conservation Spotlight

AMERICAN LITTORAL SOCIETY: SAVING BARNEGAT BAY

This Conservation Spotlight explores and celebrates
the American Littoral Society’s efforts to save Barnegat Bay

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Barnegat Bay stretches 42-miles, primarily along the inner-coast of Ocean County, New Jersey. The “Bay” is nationally recognized as a unique estuarine ecosystem with a variety of different habitats that many species depend on for survival. Due to numerous factors, but especially the development of its watershed and resulting high levels of nitrogen loading from stormwater runoff, the Bay has suffered serious ecological decline.

In an effort to save the Bay, the American Littoral Society developed a multi-faceted Clean Water Project plan, which focuses heavily on one of the Bay’s key issues: eutrophication due to excessive nitrogen loading. In partnership with Princeton Hydro, the Ocean County Soil District and others, American Littoral Society began work to decrease the volume of stormwater runoff and associated pollutants flowing into and damaging the Bay.

Screen Shot 2016-08-22 at 11.58.17 AMIn 2013, American Littoral Society, with assistance provided by Princeton Hydro, successfully secured $1,000,000 in 319(h) implementation funding through the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. American Littoral Society then developed an innovative basin ranking matrix. The matrix, created by Princeton Hydro, provides a non-biased, quantitative means of identifying and ranking stormwater management projects having the greatest potential to decrease pollutant loading to the Bay.

With funding secured and a prioritization methodology in place, American Littoral Society then began its work to retrofit antiquated, inefficient stormwater basins throughout the Barnegat Bay watershed. The goal was to reduce runoff through upgraded stormwater management systems emphasizing the application of green infrastructure techniques.

American Littoral Society and Princeton Hydro along with key partners implemented a variety of green infrastructure projects to treat stormwater at its source while delivering environmental, social and economic benefits to Barnegat Bay. Completed projects include:

  • 2 Years After Planting was Completed: Laurel Commons, Carnation Basin RetrofitConversion of standard, grassed detention basins into naturalized bio-retention basins, as exemplified by the Laurel Commons Carnation Circle Basin, which now serves as a paradigm for the cost-effective retrofitting of aged, traditional detention basins
  • At Toms River High School North, the installation of tree boxes,
  • At the Toms River Board of Education offices, the replacement of conventional paving with permeable pavement,
  • At multiple sites, the construction of rain gardens,
  • At Toms River High School North, the construction/installation of stormwater management Manufactured Treatment Devices (MTDs)
  • At the Toms River Community Medical Center (RWJ Barnabas Health), the construction of a bio-retention/infiltration basin

Education and outreach have also been key factors in improving the condition of the Bay, including training seminars for engineers, planners and code officials on basin conversion and management of green infrastructure; educational materials and signage; and public involvement in volunteer clean-ups, lawn fertilizer usage reduction, and rain garden and basin planting.  

Through its work with key partners, like Princeton Hydro, and countless volunteers, the American Littoral Society has made notable progress in Barnegat Bay, but much more needs to be done to restore and protect this unique ecosystem. Join the cause to help save Barnegat Bay; contact the American Littoral Society to find out how you can make a difference. 

For a detailed review of each project and an in-depth look at the incredible work being done to save Barnegat Bay, go here and download our brochure.

About the American Littoral Society: The American Littoral Society, founded in 1961, promotes the study and conservation of marine life and habitat, protects the coast from harm, and empowers others to do the same.

Truxor DM 5045 – The Newest Addition to the Princeton Hydro Family

Truxor DM5045 Stock Image We’re thrilled to announce the arrival of our new Truxor DM 5045!

This multi-functional, eco-friendly, amphibious machine effectively controls invasive weeds and problematic algae growth without the use of pesticides.

Its light-weight construction and highly advanced weight distribution system provide low ground pressure and high floating capacity. This allows the Truxor to operate on water, in deep or very shallow depths, and on dry land without disrupting sensitive environments, like nature preserves, wetlands, canal banks, golf courses and areas that are difficult to access with conventional equipment. And, the Truxor’s highly maneuverable and precise control system ensures easy passage through narrow channels and around hazards.

Equipped with a wide range of tools and accessories, the Truxor DM 5045 can perform a variety of functions, including weed cutting and harvesting, mat algae and debris removal, silt pumping, dredging, channel excavation, oil spill clean-up and much more!

This is the second Truxor to be welcomed to the Princeton Hydro family, which also includes a Marsh Master, another versatile, fully amphibious vehicle. Watch our Truxor DM 5000 in action.

If you’re interested in learning more about our innovative lake and pond management techniques or wondering if the Truxor is the right tool for one of your projects, please contact us!

 

 

Invasive Species in Watershed Management

A Presentation by Princeton Hydro Director of Aquatic Programs Dr. Fred Lubnow

Available for Free Download Here

Dr. Fred Lubnow, Director of Aquatic Programs for Princeton Hydro, recently held an information session about Hydrilla, the Godzilla of Invasive Species. Hosted by the Lake Hopatcong Commission, the presentation covered how to identify Hydrilla and how to prevent its proliferation.

Many recreational lake users can identify Water Chestnut, but Hydrilla is much more difficult to differentiate from another species, Elodea, which is native to Lake Hopatcong.  Dr. Lubnow’s presentation illustrates how to easily compare Elodea to Hydrilla. Armed with this information, lake users will be able to spread the word and be on the look-out for Hydrilla and other invasives.

To learn more about Princeton Hydro’s Invasive Species Management Services, visit our website or contact us!

Dr. Lubnow Invasive Species Presentation

Deal Lake Improves Water Quality on a Sustainable Basis

Success Spotlight: Deal Lake Watershed Protection Plan Implementation Project

Deal Lake Commission, Interlaken, New Jersey

Deal Lake is the largest of New Jersey’s coastal lakes, encompassing 155 acres and spanning over 27 miles of shoreline. The lake’s 4,400-acre watershed is highly developed, with the majority of development dating back to the 1940s-1960s. As a result, stormwater management, particularly with respect to water quality and volume management, is largely lacking.

Since 1980, the Deal Lake Commission (DLC) has served as the State-appointed steward of the lake.  Princeton Hydro secured the DLC $450,000 in 319(h) funding to implement the lake’s New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection-approved Watershed Protection Plan. The 319(h) funding was used by the DLC to conduct three projects designed to decrease stormwater-based pollutant loading, improve the lake’s water quality, and restore heavily eroded sections of the shoreline.

Asbury Park Comstock Street MTD

Screen Shot 2016-05-23 at 9.20.04 AMThis project involved the installation of a manufactured treatment device (MTD). MTDs are very effective “retrofit” solutions that can be used to address stormwater issues even in highly developed areas. The MTD installation was complicated by site constraints including sub-surface infrastructure. Post-installation field testing and STEPL modeling conducted by Princeton Hydro confirmed that the MTD significantly decreased the pollutant loading from one of the lake’s major stormwater outfalls.

 

Colonial Terrace Golf Course Bioretention BMPs
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Princeton Hydro conducted the field testing, engineering design, and permitting of three bio-infiltration basins constructed at the Colonial Terrace Golf Course (CTGC). Post-project-completion field testing showed each basin is capable of fully infiltrating the runoff generated by storms as great as 1.5 inches per hour. In addition, over 300 feet of eroded shoreline was stabilized with native plants. Doing so helped create a dense buffer that inhibits passage of Canada geese from the lake onto the golf course.

 

Asbury Park Boat Launch Shoreline Stabilization

Princeton Hydro developed a bio-engineering design for the stabilization of a badly eroded 250-foot segment section of shoreline adjacent to the Asbury Park boat launch. Coir fiber logs were used in conjunction with native plant material. As with the CTGC planting, help was provided by local volunteers and the DLC commissioners. The final element of the project involved the construction of a bioretention rain garden to control the runoff from the boat launch parking area. Signage was also installed to inform the public about the project and the benefits of shoreline naturalization.

 

The Deal Lake Watershed Protection Plan Implementation Project proved that despite Deal Lake being located in a highly urbanized watershed, it is possible to implement cost-effective green infrastructure and stormwater retrofit solutions capable of significantly decreasing pollutant loading to the lake.  These measures are part of the DLC’s continued efforts to utilize environmentally sustainable techniques to improve the lake’s water quality. This project won a North American Lake Management Society Technical Merit Award.

For more information about this and other Princeton Hydro projects, please contact us!

Pesticide-Free Lake Management Solutions

Blue Water Solutions for Green Water Problems

Managing your lakes and ponds without the use of pesticides

 

Proper lake and pond restoration is contingent with having a well prepared management plan. If you don’t start there, you’re just guessing as to which solutions will solve your problem. Successful, sustainable lake and pond management requires identifying and correcting the cause of eutrophication as opposed to simply reacting to the symptoms (algae and weed growth) of eutrophication. As such, Princeton Hydro collects and analyzes data to identify the problem causers and uses these scientific findings to develop a customized management plan for your specific lake or pond. A successful management plan should include a combination of biological, mechanical and source control solutions.  Here are some examples:


Biological Control:

Floating Wetland Islands (FWIs) are a great example of an effective biological control solution. They have the potential to provide multiple ecological benefits. Highly adaptable, FWIs can be sized, configured and planted to fit the needs of nearly any lake, pond or reservoir.

BROOKS LAKE FWI

Often described as self-sustaining, Floating Wetland Islands:

  • Help assimilate and remove excess nutrients that could fuel algae growth
  • Provide habitat for fish and other aquatic organisms
  • Help mitigate wave and wind erosion impacts
  • Provide an aesthetic element
  • Can be part of a holistic lake/pond management strategy

Read an article on Floating Wetland Islands written by our Aquatics Director Fred Lubnow.

Mechanical Control:

Another way to combat algae and invasive weed growth is via mechanical removal. One of the mechanical controls Princeton Hydro employs is the TruxorDM5000, an eco-friendly, multi-purpose amphibious machine that provides an effective, non-pesticide approach to controlling invasive weeds and problematic algae growth.

The TruxorDM5000: TRUXOR

  • Is capable of operating in shallow ponds and lakes where the access and/or operation of conventional harvesting or hydroraking equipment is limited
  • Is highly portable and maneuverable, yet very powerful
  • Can cut and harvest weeds and collect mat algae in near-shore areas with water depths less than three feet
  • Includes various attachments that allow the machine to easily collect and remove a variety of debris
  • Can be outfitted for sediment removal/dredging

Check out the Truxor in action here! 

Source Control:

Because phosphorus is typically the nutrient that fuels algae and weed growth, excessive phosphorus loading leads to problematic algal blooms and can stimulate excessive weed growth. One of the most sustainable means of controlling nuisance weed and algae proliferation is to control phosphorus inputs or reduce the availability of phosphorus for biological uptake and assimilation. The measures that decrease the amount or availability of phosphorus in a lake or pond are defined as “source control” strategies.

Deerfield Lake, PA – PhosLockTM treatment Through data collection and analysis, we can properly identify the primary sources of phosphorus loading to a lake and pond, whether those sources are internal or external.  Our team of lake managers, aquatic ecologists and water resource engineers use those data to develop a management plan that quantifies, prioritizes and correctly addresses problem sources of phosphorus.

PhosLockTM and alum are often utilized as environmentally-safe and controlled means to limit phosphorus availably. Although PhosLockTM works similar to alum, it does not have some of the inherent secondary environmental limitations associated with alum. PhosLockTM is a patented product that has a high affinity to bind to and permanently remove from the water column both soluble reactive and particulate forms of phosphorus. This makes it a very effective pond and lake management tool.

Read more about controlling harmful algae blooms.

These are just a few of the examples of non-pesticide lake and pond management strategies that Princeton Hydro regularly utilizes. Properly managing your lakes and ponds starts with developing the right plan and involves a holistic approach to ensure continued success. For more ideas or for help putting together a customized, comprehensive management plan, please contact us! 

How to Improve Water Quality in Your Community

Simple steps lead to big leaps in protecting water quality!
Clean water is essential to the health of communities everywhere! Here are eight things you can do to protect water resources in your community and beyond:
  • Stop mowing near streams and pondsMowing near streams and ponds eliminates the natural protective buffer that tall grasses, shrubs and trees provide. Natural buffers protect against erosion, filter stormwater runoff, reduce harmful pollutant loads and provide habitat for mosquito-eating amphibians, fish, birds and beneficial insects.
  • Reduce lawn fertilizer usage: One of the best ways to support the health of local water resources is to reduce the use of pesticides and fertilizers. Not only are they costly, but, when over-applied or if applied right before a rainstorm, the chemicals runoff directly into our local waterways. Before applying, always remember to test your soil, read product labels and check the forecast. Also consider natural alternatives like composting!
  • Host a “Test Your Well” event: Well testing is a great way to promote groundwater protection, help people understand their role in safeguarding drinking water quality, and provide education around the proper disposal of oil, chemicals, pesticides and medicines. Learn how to host an event in your community!
  • Design and construct a rain garden: You’ve heard this one from us before, but, what can we say, we love rain gardens, and rightfully so! They’re cost effective, easy to build and do wonders in reducing erosion, promoting ground water recharge, minimizing flooding and removing pollutants from stormwater runoff. Read all about them!
  • Test and treat your ponds and lakes: Testing your pond/lake water is an important part of preventing problems like harmful weed and algae growth. Princeton Hydro professionals can provide a comprehensive analysis and an array of eco-friendly approaches to control nuisance species and promote the continual health of your pond/lake. Learn more!
  • Reduce erosion and exposed soil on your property: If you notice erosion occurring on your property, planting native plants can really help! Their roots stabilize the soil, reduce erosion and prevent sediment loading in your waterways, which has a huge impact on the water quality of downstream ponds, lakes and reservoirs!
  • Develop a stewardship plan for your community: Bring your community together to help preserve its natural resources. Princeton Hydro’s team of natural resource scientists can help you get the ball rolling by preparing stewardship plans focused on controlling invasive species and protecting the long-term health of open spaces, forests habitats, wetlands and water-quality in your community.
Contact us to discuss how Princeton Hydro can help you protect your local water resources and keep your community healthy for future generations! 
“Water is life, and clean water means health.”
Audrey Hepburn

Princeton Hydro’s Earth Day Photo Contest

The contest is now closed, and we have a winner!

A very big congratulations to Corie French and her stunning sunset photo. She wins a $50 gift card to Bambeco.com, a ton of bragging rights, and Princeton Hydro will donate $100 to American Rivers in her name. Way to go, Corie!

Thanks so much to everyone who participated in the contest by submitting your photos and liking/commenting on your favorites!

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Contest Details and Original Contest Post:
Contest Alert!
Princeton Hydro is hosting a photo contest in honor of Earth Day. We want to see pictures of how you celebrate Mother Earth.
Here’s what you need to do to participate:
  • Grab your camera
  • Get outside and snap some shots of whatever you do to enjoy this lovely planet we live on
  • Choose the photo you feel best depicts “How you Celebrate Mother Earth”, and email it to: pHydroPhotoContest@gmail.com along with your name and a photo caption anytime between 4/9 – 4/21 (contest closes on 4/21 at midnight EST)
  • We’ll post your photo to the Princeton Hydro Facebook page, and then it’s your job to garner as many “Likes” for your photo as possible!
  • The photo that collects the most “Likes” within the contest timeframe wins a $50 gift card to Bambeco.com, a sustainable homegoods store, and Princeton Hydro will donate $100 to AmericanRivers.org in the winner’s name
  • “Likes” will be tallied and the winner will be announced on Earth Day, Friday, April 22
Get outside and get snapping!
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Stormwater Management for Lake Communities

A Presentation by Princeton Hydro President Dr. Steve Souza

Available for Free Download

Princeton Hydro President, Dr. Steve Souza, spent Saturday morning with over 50 members of the New Jersey Coalition of Lakes, an organization that promotes the management of healthy lake ecosystems. Together they discussed many different stormwater management options for lake communities.

Dr. Souza’s presentation covered the principles of stormwater management and the importance of incorporating stormwater management into lake restoration plans. He also provided examples of simple, homeowner-scale runoff control techniques, as well as a sampling of Princeton Hydro designed and constructed large-scale, community-based stormwater management systems. Download a copy of the full presentation here or below!

The meeting hosts, Lake Mohawk Country Club and Lake Mohawk Preservation Foundation, have implemented a number of local stormwater enhancement projects. To check out some examples, go here.

To learn more about Princeton Hydro’s stormwater management and lake restoration services, visit our website or contact us!

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7 Easy Water Conservation Tips

Spring is Here!

What better time to “spring” into water conservation?!

Here are a few simple ways to incorporate water conservation into your spring-cleaning routine:

  • Household leaks can waste more than 1 trillion gallons annually nationwide. Spring is a great time to check for leaks, some of which may have have been caused by winter freeze. Check garden hose spigots, sprinklers, faucets, showers and toilets for leaks, and replace valves, washers and other components as necessary.
  • Install a low-flow showerhead; doing so can save you up to 75 gallons of water per week.
  • While planning your spring/summer flower garden, be sure to incorporate water-wise garden techniques that include drought tolerant plants native to your area. Click here for more info!
  • Create a rain garden! Prepare for spring showers by constructing rain gardens into which runoff from downspouts, walkways, parking areas and even lawn surfaces can be directed. Rain gardens are an inexpensive, attractive and sustainable means to minimize runoff. Click here to learn more!
  • Install a rain barrel and use the captured rainfall to irrigate flower beds. This is another fun and inexpensive way to reduce runoff and save water.
  • To decrease irrigation demands, reduce the size of your lawn (see above tips) and switch to drought tolerant grass species. Also, delay regular lawn watering during cooler spring weather, and irrigate deep, but less frequently during the summer to encourage deep root growth. These measures ensure a healthier lawn throughout the summer. During the summer, keep your mower height high and don’t cut off more than one third of the grass blades; this promotes a healthy lawn that is more drought tolerant.
  • When cleaning your driveway, sidewalk and patio areas, remember to use a broom, not a hose. This not only helps conserve water, it also prevents the run-off of pollutants into our storm drains and ultimately our lakes, ponds, streams, rivers and oceans.
“Spring” into water conservation
and make it a part of every season!

Preventing Zika Virus & Other Mosquito-Borne Diseases

The start of mosquito season is right around the corner. Princeton Hydro offers simple solutions to reduce mosquito exposure and eliminate mosquito breeding.

Concerns about Zika virus (transmitted by the Aedes aegypti mosquito) arose in Brazil last May and have since quickly escalated. With cases confirmed in over 20 countries across Central and South America, the World Health Organization (WHO) recently declared the virus an international public health emergency. WHO reported that Zika could infect as many as 4 million people by the end of 2016. Additionally, West Nile virus remains a concern throughout the U.S. along with other mosquito-borne illnesses that affect humans, pets and livestock.

With spring rains and warmer temperatures on the horizon, mosquitos of all types will soon be buzzing. As predicted by the National Center for Atmospheric Research, by June we can expect mosquitos carrying the Zika virus to arrive in the Mid-Atlantic States. There are many simple measures that public and private pond and land owners can take in advance of mosquito season to reduce mosquito breeding and lessen the spread of mosquito-borne illnesses without resorting to the use of chemicals.

Here are three simple mosquito-prevention tips for ponds:

  • Eliminate stagnant water by installing a sub-surface aeration system. This will keep the pond thoroughly mixed and properly circulated. Subsurface aeration systems are the most cost-effective and energy-efficient way to maintain proper pond circulation and mixing. DSC02027Agitating the water’s surface interferes with the female mosquito’s ability to lay eggs and the success of mosquito larvae.
  • Along the shoreline of the pond, maintain or create an aquascaped edge dominated by native, non-invasive vegetation. As opposed to a sterile lawn edge, an aquascaped edge provides habitat for mosquito-eating amphibians, fish, birds, and beneficial insects.
  • Prevent grass clippings and lawn fertilizer from entering the pond. Doing so decreases the chance of an algae bloom which could create the still water conditions that favor mosquito breeding.

Additionally, you may want to consider hiring a certified professional to assess your pond and develop a customized management plan. Having your pond inspected by an expert helps you stay informed about your pond’s ecological status and implement measures to prevent/remedy conditions that could create mosquito breeding habitat and promote mosquito related problems.

But that’s not all!

Here are seven things you can do around your home or business property to prevent mosquito breeding:

  • Stagnant water is the perfect habitat for mosquito breeding. IMG_0695Check your property for areas where water easily collects: empty flower pots, buckets, old tires, tire ruts, low spots in lawns and trash cans.
  • Clear clogged rain gutters and storm drains, and keep them free of debris.
  • Regularly change the water in bird baths and pet dishes.
  • Store canoes and small boats upside-down.
  • Check tarps and grill covers for pooled water, and shake them out after a rain storm.
  • Repair leaky outside faucets, pipes and hoses to prevent puddles from forming.

Simply put, if you want to limit mosquito breeding in your pond or on your property, take the time to implement long-term management measures that integrate natural solutions, thereby creating an inhospitable environment for mosquitos. As noted above, this can be accomplished without resorting to chemicals! In addition to keeping your pond properly circulated, employ preventative practices that eliminate potential mosquito-breeding areas around your property, and regularly inspect areas to help quickly identify and resolve developing mosquito populations.

Princeton Hydro offers a full complement of services, including detailed water quality analysis, adaptive management plans and field services covering all areas of pond maintenance. Our team of certified lake and pond managers, wetland scientists, and water resource engineers can provide you with the expertise needed to diagnose the cause of pond problems and develop solutions that are environmentally sound and cost-effective. Contact Princeton Hydro to discuss how we can help you!

Read an interesting article about the origins of Zika here.