The Westtown Dam and Lake Restoration Project is Now Complete!

westtown-0720161456Princeton Hydro is proud to announce the completion of the Westtown dam restoration and dredging project. For the past 10 years, Princeton Hydro has been working with the Westtown School on dam safety compliance and lake restoration and is the engineer-of-record for the restoration of the Westtown dam and lake.

Westtown School, a hallmark of the Westtown Lake community, initially contracted Princeton Hydro to complete dam inspections and assess the lake in terms of its environmental health and the need for dredging. The completion of this project is a testament to the School’s commitment to its mission of “inspiring and preparing its graduates to be stewards and leaders of a better world”. The School leads by example through practicing dam safety compliance and working to restore the lake for future generations.

westtown-img_2438For the dam, Princeton Hydro completed periodic visual inspections, dam breach and inundation analysis, the preparation of an Emergency Action Plan (EAP), and the Operations and Maintenance Manual.

For rehabilitation, Princeton Hydro designed the dam to be able to pass the 100-year flood event via a completely new drop spillway and outfall barrel, and the construction of an auxiliary/emergency cast-in-place stepped spillway. As part of the rehabilitation of the dam, Princeton Hydro surveyed and designed the dredging of 56,000 cubic yards of sediment, the rehabilitation of the lake’s sedimentation forebay and spillway, and the enlargement of a culvert on Westtown Road, immediately downstream of the dam. The culvert replacement was required due to the closure of two secondary outlets on the dam and corresponding culverts below Westtown Road.

westtown-0713161041aThis project also required a variety of permits, including a Chester County soil erosion and sediment control plan approval, a Dam Safety construction permit, a PADEP General Permit 11 for the road crossing, and a US Army Corps of Engineers Individual Permit in compliance with the Federal Clean Water Act.

Additionally, Princeton Hydro successfully navigated interests for two species of concern: the bog turtle (federal and state listed) habitat and red-bellied turtle (state listed) populations.

Following design and permitting, Princeton Hydro provided construction documentation and administration, including the review of shop drawings, monitoring soil compaction, inspecting concrete pours and collecting concrete test cylinders for break tests (ACI certified engineers), completing monthly progress reports, reviewing payment requests and change orders, and attend bi-weekly project meetings with the client. Flyway Excavating, the contractor for the project, worked seamlessly with the School and Princeton Hydro to accomplish the overall goals of the design.

The Westtown project is an excellent example of Princeton Hydro’s turnkey engineering, permitting, and construction administration services. Please contact us if you have a similar project you need assistance with or have questions about.

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*Photos courtesy of Flyway Excavating.

 

 

 

Enjoy Your Labor Day Adventures Responsibly

Princeton Hydro Offers
Seven Tips for Environmentally-Friendly Outdoor Fun

 

Labor Day is right around the corner! Many people will soon be packing up the car with fishing gear, and heading to their favorite lake for a fun-filled weekend.

As biologists, scientists and outdoor enthusiasts, all of us at Princeton Hydro fully enjoy getting outside and having fun in nature. We also take our responsibility to care for and respect our natural surroundings very seriously. We play hard and work hard to protect our natural resources for generations to come.

These seven tips will help you enjoy your Labor Day fishing, boating and outdoor adventures with minimal environmental impact:

  • Before you go, know your local fishing regulations. These laws protect fish and other aquatic species to ensure that the joys of fishing can be shared by everyone well into the future.
  • Reduce the spread of invasive species by thoroughly washing your gear and watercraft before and after your trip. Invasives come in many forms – plants, fungi and animals – and even those of microscopic size can cause major damage.
  • Stay on designated paths to avoid disrupting sensitive and protected areas, like wetlands, shorelines, stream banks and meadows. Disturbing and damaging these sensitive areas can jeopardize the health of the many important species living there.
  • Exercise catch and release best practices. Always keep the health of the fish at the forefront of your activities by using the right gear and employing proper techniques. Get that info by clicking here
  • Use artificial lures or bait that is native to the area you’re fishing in. Live bait that is non-native can introduce invasive species to water sources and cause serious damage to the surrounding environment.
  • Plan ahead and map your trip. Contact the office of land management to learn about permit requirements, area closures and other restrictions. Use this interactive map to find great fishing spots in your area, the fish species you can expect to find at each spot, nearby gear shops, and more!

Armed with these seven tips, you can now enjoy your weekend while feeling rest assured that you’re doing your part to protect the outdoor spaces and wild places we all love to recreate in! Go here to learn about some of the work Princeton Hydro does to restore and protect our natural resources.

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“Respect nature and it will provide you with abundance.”

–compassionkindness.com

Princeton Hydro’s Conservation Spotlight

AMERICAN LITTORAL SOCIETY: SAVING BARNEGAT BAY

This Conservation Spotlight explores and celebrates
the American Littoral Society’s efforts to save Barnegat Bay

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Barnegat Bay stretches 42-miles, primarily along the inner-coast of Ocean County, New Jersey. The “Bay” is nationally recognized as a unique estuarine ecosystem with a variety of different habitats that many species depend on for survival. Due to numerous factors, but especially the development of its watershed and resulting high levels of nitrogen loading from stormwater runoff, the Bay has suffered serious ecological decline.

In an effort to save the Bay, the American Littoral Society developed a multi-faceted Clean Water Project plan, which focuses heavily on one of the Bay’s key issues: eutrophication due to excessive nitrogen loading. In partnership with Princeton Hydro, the Ocean County Soil District and others, American Littoral Society began work to decrease the volume of stormwater runoff and associated pollutants flowing into and damaging the Bay.

Screen Shot 2016-08-22 at 11.58.17 AMIn 2013, American Littoral Society, with assistance provided by Princeton Hydro, successfully secured $1,000,000 in 319(h) implementation funding through the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. American Littoral Society then developed an innovative basin ranking matrix. The matrix, created by Princeton Hydro, provides a non-biased, quantitative means of identifying and ranking stormwater management projects having the greatest potential to decrease pollutant loading to the Bay.

With funding secured and a prioritization methodology in place, American Littoral Society then began its work to retrofit antiquated, inefficient stormwater basins throughout the Barnegat Bay watershed. The goal was to reduce runoff through upgraded stormwater management systems emphasizing the application of green infrastructure techniques.

American Littoral Society and Princeton Hydro along with key partners implemented a variety of green infrastructure projects to treat stormwater at its source while delivering environmental, social and economic benefits to Barnegat Bay. Completed projects include:

  • 2 Years After Planting was Completed: Laurel Commons, Carnation Basin RetrofitConversion of standard, grassed detention basins into naturalized bio-retention basins, as exemplified by the Laurel Commons Carnation Circle Basin, which now serves as a paradigm for the cost-effective retrofitting of aged, traditional detention basins
  • At Toms River High School North, the installation of tree boxes,
  • At the Toms River Board of Education offices, the replacement of conventional paving with permeable pavement,
  • At multiple sites, the construction of rain gardens,
  • At Toms River High School North, the construction/installation of stormwater management Manufactured Treatment Devices (MTDs)
  • At the Toms River Community Medical Center (RWJ Barnabas Health), the construction of a bio-retention/infiltration basin

Education and outreach have also been key factors in improving the condition of the Bay, including training seminars for engineers, planners and code officials on basin conversion and management of green infrastructure; educational materials and signage; and public involvement in volunteer clean-ups, lawn fertilizer usage reduction, and rain garden and basin planting.  

Through its work with key partners, like Princeton Hydro, and countless volunteers, the American Littoral Society has made notable progress in Barnegat Bay, but much more needs to be done to restore and protect this unique ecosystem. Join the cause to help save Barnegat Bay; contact the American Littoral Society to find out how you can make a difference. 

For a detailed review of each project and an in-depth look at the incredible work being done to save Barnegat Bay, go here and download our brochure.

About the American Littoral Society: The American Littoral Society, founded in 1961, promotes the study and conservation of marine life and habitat, protects the coast from harm, and empowers others to do the same.

Truxor DM 5045 – The Newest Addition to the Princeton Hydro Family

Truxor DM5045 Stock Image We’re thrilled to announce the arrival of our new Truxor DM 5045!

This multi-functional, eco-friendly, amphibious machine effectively controls invasive weeds and problematic algae growth without the use of pesticides.

Its light-weight construction and highly advanced weight distribution system provide low ground pressure and high floating capacity. This allows the Truxor to operate on water, in deep or very shallow depths, and on dry land without disrupting sensitive environments, like nature preserves, wetlands, canal banks, golf courses and areas that are difficult to access with conventional equipment. And, the Truxor’s highly maneuverable and precise control system ensures easy passage through narrow channels and around hazards.

Equipped with a wide range of tools and accessories, the Truxor DM 5045 can perform a variety of functions, including weed cutting and harvesting, mat algae and debris removal, silt pumping, dredging, channel excavation, oil spill clean-up and much more!

This is the second Truxor to be welcomed to the Princeton Hydro family, which also includes a Marsh Master, another versatile, fully amphibious vehicle. Watch our Truxor DM 5000 in action.

If you’re interested in learning more about our innovative lake and pond management techniques or wondering if the Truxor is the right tool for one of your projects, please contact us!

 

 

Invasive Species in Watershed Management

A Presentation by Princeton Hydro Director of Aquatic Programs Dr. Fred Lubnow

Available for Free Download Here

Dr. Fred Lubnow, Director of Aquatic Programs for Princeton Hydro, recently held an information session about Hydrilla, the Godzilla of Invasive Species. Hosted by the Lake Hopatcong Commission, the presentation covered how to identify Hydrilla and how to prevent its proliferation.

Many recreational lake users can identify Water Chestnut, but Hydrilla is much more difficult to differentiate from another species, Elodea, which is native to Lake Hopatcong.  Dr. Lubnow’s presentation illustrates how to easily compare Elodea to Hydrilla. Armed with this information, lake users will be able to spread the word and be on the look-out for Hydrilla and other invasives.

To learn more about Princeton Hydro’s Invasive Species Management Services, visit our website or contact us!

Dr. Lubnow Invasive Species Presentation

Deal Lake Improves Water Quality on a Sustainable Basis

Success Spotlight: Deal Lake Watershed Protection Plan Implementation Project

Deal Lake Commission, Interlaken, New Jersey

Deal Lake is the largest of New Jersey’s coastal lakes, encompassing 155 acres and spanning over 27 miles of shoreline. The lake’s 4,400-acre watershed is highly developed, with the majority of development dating back to the 1940s-1960s. As a result, stormwater management, particularly with respect to water quality and volume management, is largely lacking.

Since 1980, the Deal Lake Commission (DLC) has served as the State-appointed steward of the lake.  Princeton Hydro secured the DLC $450,000 in 319(h) funding to implement the lake’s New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection-approved Watershed Protection Plan. The 319(h) funding was used by the DLC to conduct three projects designed to decrease stormwater-based pollutant loading, improve the lake’s water quality, and restore heavily eroded sections of the shoreline.

Asbury Park Comstock Street MTD

Screen Shot 2016-05-23 at 9.20.04 AMThis project involved the installation of a manufactured treatment device (MTD). MTDs are very effective “retrofit” solutions that can be used to address stormwater issues even in highly developed areas. The MTD installation was complicated by site constraints including sub-surface infrastructure. Post-installation field testing and STEPL modeling conducted by Princeton Hydro confirmed that the MTD significantly decreased the pollutant loading from one of the lake’s major stormwater outfalls.

 

Colonial Terrace Golf Course Bioretention BMPs
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Princeton Hydro conducted the field testing, engineering design, and permitting of three bio-infiltration basins constructed at the Colonial Terrace Golf Course (CTGC). Post-project-completion field testing showed each basin is capable of fully infiltrating the runoff generated by storms as great as 1.5 inches per hour. In addition, over 300 feet of eroded shoreline was stabilized with native plants. Doing so helped create a dense buffer that inhibits passage of Canada geese from the lake onto the golf course.

 

Asbury Park Boat Launch Shoreline Stabilization

Princeton Hydro developed a bio-engineering design for the stabilization of a badly eroded 250-foot segment section of shoreline adjacent to the Asbury Park boat launch. Coir fiber logs were used in conjunction with native plant material. As with the CTGC planting, help was provided by local volunteers and the DLC commissioners. The final element of the project involved the construction of a bioretention rain garden to control the runoff from the boat launch parking area. Signage was also installed to inform the public about the project and the benefits of shoreline naturalization.

 

The Deal Lake Watershed Protection Plan Implementation Project proved that despite Deal Lake being located in a highly urbanized watershed, it is possible to implement cost-effective green infrastructure and stormwater retrofit solutions capable of significantly decreasing pollutant loading to the lake.  These measures are part of the DLC’s continued efforts to utilize environmentally sustainable techniques to improve the lake’s water quality. This project won a North American Lake Management Society Technical Merit Award.

For more information about this and other Princeton Hydro projects, please contact us!

Pesticide-Free Lake Management Solutions

Blue Water Solutions for Green Water Problems

Managing your lakes and ponds without the use of pesticides

 

Proper lake and pond restoration is contingent with having a well prepared management plan. If you don’t start there, you’re just guessing as to which solutions will solve your problem. Successful, sustainable lake and pond management requires identifying and correcting the cause of eutrophication as opposed to simply reacting to the symptoms (algae and weed growth) of eutrophication. As such, Princeton Hydro collects and analyzes data to identify the problem causers and uses these scientific findings to develop a customized management plan for your specific lake or pond. A successful management plan should include a combination of biological, mechanical and source control solutions.  Here are some examples:


Biological Control:

Floating Wetland Islands (FWIs) are a great example of an effective biological control solution. They have the potential to provide multiple ecological benefits. Highly adaptable, FWIs can be sized, configured and planted to fit the needs of nearly any lake, pond or reservoir.

BROOKS LAKE FWI

Often described as self-sustaining, Floating Wetland Islands:

  • Help assimilate and remove excess nutrients that could fuel algae growth
  • Provide habitat for fish and other aquatic organisms
  • Help mitigate wave and wind erosion impacts
  • Provide an aesthetic element
  • Can be part of a holistic lake/pond management strategy

Read an article on Floating Wetland Islands written by our Aquatics Director Fred Lubnow.

Mechanical Control:

Another way to combat algae and invasive weed growth is via mechanical removal. One of the mechanical controls Princeton Hydro employs is the TruxorDM5000, an eco-friendly, multi-purpose amphibious machine that provides an effective, non-pesticide approach to controlling invasive weeds and problematic algae growth.

The TruxorDM5000: TRUXOR

  • Is capable of operating in shallow ponds and lakes where the access and/or operation of conventional harvesting or hydroraking equipment is limited
  • Is highly portable and maneuverable, yet very powerful
  • Can cut and harvest weeds and collect mat algae in near-shore areas with water depths less than three feet
  • Includes various attachments that allow the machine to easily collect and remove a variety of debris
  • Can be outfitted for sediment removal/dredging

Check out the Truxor in action here! 

Source Control:

Because phosphorus is typically the nutrient that fuels algae and weed growth, excessive phosphorus loading leads to problematic algal blooms and can stimulate excessive weed growth. One of the most sustainable means of controlling nuisance weed and algae proliferation is to control phosphorus inputs or reduce the availability of phosphorus for biological uptake and assimilation. The measures that decrease the amount or availability of phosphorus in a lake or pond are defined as “source control” strategies.

Deerfield Lake, PA – PhosLockTM treatment Through data collection and analysis, we can properly identify the primary sources of phosphorus loading to a lake and pond, whether those sources are internal or external.  Our team of lake managers, aquatic ecologists and water resource engineers use those data to develop a management plan that quantifies, prioritizes and correctly addresses problem sources of phosphorus.

PhosLockTM and alum are often utilized as environmentally-safe and controlled means to limit phosphorus availably. Although PhosLockTM works similar to alum, it does not have some of the inherent secondary environmental limitations associated with alum. PhosLockTM is a patented product that has a high affinity to bind to and permanently remove from the water column both soluble reactive and particulate forms of phosphorus. This makes it a very effective pond and lake management tool.

Read more about controlling harmful algae blooms.

These are just a few of the examples of non-pesticide lake and pond management strategies that Princeton Hydro regularly utilizes. Properly managing your lakes and ponds starts with developing the right plan and involves a holistic approach to ensure continued success. For more ideas or for help putting together a customized, comprehensive management plan, please contact us! 

How to Improve Water Quality in Your Community

Simple steps lead to big leaps in protecting water quality!
Clean water is essential to the health of communities everywhere! Here are eight things you can do to protect water resources in your community and beyond:
  • Stop mowing near streams and pondsMowing near streams and ponds eliminates the natural protective buffer that tall grasses, shrubs and trees provide. Natural buffers protect against erosion, filter stormwater runoff, reduce harmful pollutant loads and provide habitat for mosquito-eating amphibians, fish, birds and beneficial insects.
  • Reduce lawn fertilizer usage: One of the best ways to support the health of local water resources is to reduce the use of pesticides and fertilizers. Not only are they costly, but, when over-applied or if applied right before a rainstorm, the chemicals runoff directly into our local waterways. Before applying, always remember to test your soil, read product labels and check the forecast. Also consider natural alternatives like composting!
  • Host a “Test Your Well” event: Well testing is a great way to promote groundwater protection, help people understand their role in safeguarding drinking water quality, and provide education around the proper disposal of oil, chemicals, pesticides and medicines. Learn how to host an event in your community!
  • Design and construct a rain garden: You’ve heard this one from us before, but, what can we say, we love rain gardens, and rightfully so! They’re cost effective, easy to build and do wonders in reducing erosion, promoting ground water recharge, minimizing flooding and removing pollutants from stormwater runoff. Read all about them!
  • Test and treat your ponds and lakes: Testing your pond/lake water is an important part of preventing problems like harmful weed and algae growth. Princeton Hydro professionals can provide a comprehensive analysis and an array of eco-friendly approaches to control nuisance species and promote the continual health of your pond/lake. Learn more!
  • Reduce erosion and exposed soil on your property: If you notice erosion occurring on your property, planting native plants can really help! Their roots stabilize the soil, reduce erosion and prevent sediment loading in your waterways, which has a huge impact on the water quality of downstream ponds, lakes and reservoirs!
  • Develop a stewardship plan for your community: Bring your community together to help preserve its natural resources. Princeton Hydro’s team of natural resource scientists can help you get the ball rolling by preparing stewardship plans focused on controlling invasive species and protecting the long-term health of open spaces, forests habitats, wetlands and water-quality in your community.
Contact us to discuss how Princeton Hydro can help you protect your local water resources and keep your community healthy for future generations! 
“Water is life, and clean water means health.”
Audrey Hepburn

Princeton Hydro’s Earth Day Photo Contest

The contest is now closed, and we have a winner!

A very big congratulations to Corie French and her stunning sunset photo. She wins a $50 gift card to Bambeco.com, a ton of bragging rights, and Princeton Hydro will donate $100 to American Rivers in her name. Way to go, Corie!

Thanks so much to everyone who participated in the contest by submitting your photos and liking/commenting on your favorites!

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Contest Details and Original Contest Post:
Contest Alert!
Princeton Hydro is hosting a photo contest in honor of Earth Day. We want to see pictures of how you celebrate Mother Earth.
Here’s what you need to do to participate:
  • Grab your camera
  • Get outside and snap some shots of whatever you do to enjoy this lovely planet we live on
  • Choose the photo you feel best depicts “How you Celebrate Mother Earth”, and email it to: pHydroPhotoContest@gmail.com along with your name and a photo caption anytime between 4/9 – 4/21 (contest closes on 4/21 at midnight EST)
  • We’ll post your photo to the Princeton Hydro Facebook page, and then it’s your job to garner as many “Likes” for your photo as possible!
  • The photo that collects the most “Likes” within the contest timeframe wins a $50 gift card to Bambeco.com, a sustainable homegoods store, and Princeton Hydro will donate $100 to AmericanRivers.org in the winner’s name
  • “Likes” will be tallied and the winner will be announced on Earth Day, Friday, April 22
Get outside and get snapping!
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Stormwater Management for Lake Communities

A Presentation by Princeton Hydro President Dr. Steve Souza

Available for Free Download

Princeton Hydro President, Dr. Steve Souza, spent Saturday morning with over 50 members of the New Jersey Coalition of Lakes, an organization that promotes the management of healthy lake ecosystems. Together they discussed many different stormwater management options for lake communities.

Dr. Souza’s presentation covered the principles of stormwater management and the importance of incorporating stormwater management into lake restoration plans. He also provided examples of simple, homeowner-scale runoff control techniques, as well as a sampling of Princeton Hydro designed and constructed large-scale, community-based stormwater management systems. Download a copy of the full presentation here or below!

The meeting hosts, Lake Mohawk Country Club and Lake Mohawk Preservation Foundation, have implemented a number of local stormwater enhancement projects. To check out some examples, go here.

To learn more about Princeton Hydro’s stormwater management and lake restoration services, visit our website or contact us!

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