Employee Spotlight: Meet Our New Team Members

We’re excited to welcome two new staff members and seven new part-time staff & interns to our team who are spread throughout our Ringoes, Sicklerville, and Glastonbury offices.

 

Full-Time Staff Members:
Kelsey Mattison, Marketing Coordinator

Kelsey is a recent graduate of St. Lawrence University with a degree in English and environmental studies and a passion for environmental communication. Through her extracurricular work with various nonprofit organizations, she has developed expertise in social media management, content writing, storytelling, and interdisciplinary thinking. Kelsey believes that effective communication needs to be multi-faceted, which is reflected in the diversity of her experience. She served as Photography Editor of St. Lawrence University’s newspaper, worked in digital media for the environmental outreach program of St. Lawrence University,  produced stories for Northern New York’s public radio station, and developed feature content for St. Lawrence County’s Chamber of Commerce. As a member of the Princeton Hydro team, she aims to further its mission by taking creative approaches to communicating about our shared home: Planet Earth. In her free time, Kelsey enjoys dancing of all sorts, going on long walks with her camera, and spending time with friends and family in nature.

Christine Worthington, Accounting Assistant

Christine is a detailed-oriented Accounting Assistant who has over 15 years of experience working in office administration for local businesses. She loves vacationing in Jamaica with her husband and spending time with her two sons & three grandchildren. In her free time, she listens to country music and visits new cities like Nashville.

 

Part-time Staff, Field Assistants & Interns:
Heidi Golden, PhD, Aquatic Ecologist

Heidi is an aquatic ecologist and evolutionary biologist with a strong background in fish monitoring, aquatic habitat assessment, population and community ecology, and population genetics and genomics. She holds a PhD in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and a Master of Science in Forestry and Wildlife Biology. In addition to her ecology expertise, Heidi has experience in GIS analysis, R statistical programing, scientific writing, permitting, and a wide range of field and laboratory techniques. Prior to joining Princeton Hydro, Heidi worked as a postdoctoral researcher with The Woods Hole Research Center, The Marine Biological Laboratory, and The University of Connecticut, where she continues to serve as adjunct faculty to the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. She investigated ecological and evolutionary responses of fish populations to rapid environmental change. Her professional experience also includes coordinating field expeditions in remote locations of the Alaskan Arctic, tagging and tracking thousands of fish through remote PIT-tag antenna arrays, using environmental DNA to monitor fish presence and movement, and developing experiments to assess ecosystem responses to change. She enjoys raising ducks, swimming in cold rivers, hiking, kayaking, camping, and family.

Andrew Greenlaw, Water Resources Intern

Andrew Greenlaw is in his fourth year at the University of Connecticut, majoring in Civil Engineering with a minor in Environmental Engineering. Before studying engineering he taught at a Marine science summer camp in Groton, CT, off of the Long Island Sound. He joined Princeton Hydro with the hope of combining his biological sciences experience with his academic engineering knowledge. He enjoys hiking, fishing, and just about any outdoor sport.

Ryan Lindsay, Water Resources Intern

Ryan is a double major at Rowan University focusing in both Civil & Environmental Engineering and Computer Science, and is currently finishing his final semester. He’s worked on various engineering clinic projects ranging from developing a pavement analysis program for Rhode Island DOT to a feasibility study to assist those with disabilities. His current project is to develop a home security/monitoring system with an accompanying mobile application. In the future, Ryan hopes to develop civil engineering applications for use by design engineers, and hopes that with his unique skillset he can make future engineers’ jobs easier and more efficient. Ryan enjoys playing baseball, listening to music, hiking and hanging out with friends and family.

Nick Niezgoda, Aquatics Field Assistant

Nick graduated in 2017 from Western State Colorado University with a B.S. in Biology. He lived and worked at Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory studying defense genotypes of B.stricta under Duke University’s Tom Mitchell-Olds Lab in 2016 and 2018. At RMBL, He also assisted in trapping and banding of Mountain White-Crowned Sparrows. He enjoys cycling, hiking, and birding!

Emily McGuckin, Aquatics Field Assistant

Emily is a recent graduate from Stockton University, with a BS in marine biology, and a minor in environmental science. She just finished up an internship with the American Littoral Society at Sandy Hook, where she helped manage the fish tagging program and educating others on the importance of maintaining an accurate fisheries database. She has experience in both freshwater and marine ecosystem management and is excited to continue learning about ecological restoration and management.  She is very interested in ecosystem resilience, specifically climate change and how it affects estuaries and estuarine organisms. Emily is hoping to attend graduate school in the near future to further her studies in marine science.

Pat Rose, Aquatics Field Assistant

Pat got interested in aquatics during a summer course studying at Lake Atitlán, Guatemala as an undergraduate at SUNY Oneonta. After graduation, he spent a year volunteering with AmeriCorps in Knoxville, TN as part of a Water Quality Team. While in Tennessee, he spent the majority of his time educating high school students on how to protect and improve local waterways and watersheds as part of the Adopt-A-Watershed program. The year, through AmeriCorps, he also worked with government organizations performing biological sampling and erosion monitoring in local streams. Pat is set to graduate from SUNY Oneonta with a M.S. in Lake Management in December. He created an interim lake management plan for a small reservoir in New York that has had cyanobacterial blooms over the past few years. Pat spent this past summer completing a co-op with an aquatic plant management company in the Pacific Northwest, working primarily with invasive Eurasian and hybrid watermilfoil populations.

 

Restoring and Revitalizing Freshwater Mussels

Freshwater mussels are among the oldest living and second most diverse organisms on Earth with over 1,000 recognized species. Here in the eastern part of the U.S., we have more species of freshwater mussels than anywhere in the world. Unfortunately, freshwater mussels are one of the most rapidly declining animal groups in North America. Out of the 300 species and subspecies found on the continent, 70 (23%) have been federally listed as “Threatened” or “Endangered” under the Endangered Species Act. And, in the last century, over 30 species have become permanently extinct. So, why are populations declining so fast?

Freshwater mussels are filter feeders and process large volumes of the water they live in to obtain food. This means of survival also makes them highly susceptible to industrial and agricultural water pollution.  Because they are constantly filtering water, the contaminants and pathogens that are present are absorbed into the mussel’s tissues. As such, mussels are good indicators of water quality and can greatly contribute to improving water quality by filtering algae, bacteria and organic matter from the water column.

Not only do freshwater mussels rely on water quality, they are dependent on fish and other aquatic organisms for reproductive success. In order for a freshwater mussel to complete the reproduction process, it must “infect” a host fish with its larvae. The method depends on the specie of mussel. Some species lure fish using highly modified and evolved appendages that mimic prey. When a fish goes into investigate the lures, the female mussel releases fertilized eggs that attach to the fish, becoming temporarily parasitic. Once the host fish is infected, it can transfer the mussel larvae upstream and into new areas of the river.

Both habitat loss from dam construction and the introduction of pesticides into the water supply has contributed to the decline of freshwater mussels. With approximately 300 mussel species in the U.S. alone, a critical component of restoring and revitalizing mussel populations is truly understanding their biology, which begins with the ability to properly differentiate each species and properly identify and catalog them. Princeton Hydro’s Senior Scientist Evan Kwityn, CLP and Aquatic Ecologist Jesse Smith recently completed the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service‘s Fresh Water Mussel Identification Training at the National Conservation Training Center in West Virginia.

Through hands-on laboratory training, Evan and Jesse developed their freshwater mussel identification skills and their knowledge of freshwater mussel species biology. Course participants were tasked with mastering approximately 100 of the most common freshwater mussel species in the United States. They also learned about proper freshwater mussel collection labeling, the internal and external anatomy and meristics of a freshwater mussel, and distributional maps as an aid to freshwater mussel identification.

In a recently published press release, Tierra Curry, a senior scientist with the Center for Biological Diversity was quoted as saying, “The health of freshwater mussels directly reflects river health, so protecting the places where these mussels live will help all of us who rely on clean water. This is especially important now, when we see growing threats to clean water from climate change, agriculture and other sources.”

Princeton Hydro is committed to protecting water quality, restoring habitats, and managing natural resources. Read about some of our recent projects and contact us to discuss how we can help you.

To learn more about freshwater mussels, check out this video from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service: