Princeton Hydro Joins American Sustainable Business Council

Princeton Hydro is proud to join the American Sustainable Business Council (ASBC), a coalition of businesses that prioritizes, “a triple bottom line of People, Planet, and Profit.” ASBC works to combat climate change by divesting from fossil fuels and investing in climate solutions, and passing carbon tax legislature at both federal and state levels. ASBC also works to address many other issues related to public health and the economy.

As a sustainable business headquartered in New Jersey, Princeton Hydro is also affiliated with the New Jersey Sustainable Business Council, the state chapter of the ASBC. In addition to joining the councils, Princeton Hydro’s President, Geoffrey Goll, P.E. joined the steering committee for ASBC’s “Clean Water is Good for Business” campaign.

“At Princeton Hydro, we are passionate about the protection of natural resources, fostering stewardship, and designing and conducting business in a sustainable manner. We believe in affecting positive change in our world for people and the environment,” said Goll. “We’re excited to align ourselves with an organization that reflects our core values, and we look forward to future sustainable business opportunities.”

The Clean Water is Good for Business campaign focuses on the Delaware River Watershed, a region that Princeton Hydro is actively working to protect and enhance. The campaign focuses on the importance of clean water, not just for human health, but for business health as well. Even companies that don’t directly rely on clean water for production of goods still need it to sustain day-to-day functions and keep employees healthy. ASBC recently released its Business Case where it lists the top priorities of the campaign as creating a comprehensive strategy, growing funding for conservation, and decreasing stormwater runoff.

Clean water is not only the key foundation to life itself, but a sustainable economy as well. Without clean water, we put our natural resources, businesses, and communities at risk. Protecting water quality is a long-term effort that requires continued investment, monitoring, and evaluation.

Princeton Hydro offers expertise in water resources management and engineering, ecosystems, and geotechnical investigations and design. Our staff provides a full suite of services throughout the Mid-Atlantic and New England states. Our capabilities are reflected in our award-winning projects that consistently produce real-world, cost-effective solutions. If you’re interested in learning how Princeton Hydro can help you, please contact us.

PHOTOS: Columbia Dam Removal

VIDEO: “Columbia Lake Dam when the water level was 18 inches to 2 feet lower”
Video courtesy of Matt Hencheck

In Northwest New Jersey on the Paulins Kill, an important tributary to the Delaware River, the century-old hydroelectric Columbia Dam is actively being removed. Princeton Hydro was contracted by American Rivers to investigate, design, and apply for permits for the removal of this dam for the New Jersey chapter of The Nature Conservancy. Our team of engineers and ecologists studied the feasibility of removal by collecting sediment samples, performing bioassay tests, and conducting a hydraulic analysis of upstream and downstream conditions. We’re excited to report that the Columbia Dam removal has officially commenced!

The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection started draining water from Columbia Lake a few weeks ago, which was the first step in removing the dam. Princeton Hydro has subsequently been contracted by The Nature Conservancy to provide construction administration services.  Photos below show the water at lowered levels at the impoundments.

“Dewatering Impoundment” Photo by Princeton Hydro

“An aerial drone snapshot when water levels were down about 5 feet at the upper impoundment” Photo courtesy of the New Jersey Chapter of The Nature Conservancy

Last week, the first hammer hit the wall of a downstream dam remnant, officially starting the removal process.

“The first hammer”  Photo courtesy of Dale Bentz, RiverLogic Solutions

The dam removal process will last a few weeks, as the contractor actively knocks down the thick concrete wall.

“Pressure and time”  Photo courtesy of Dale Bentz, RiverLogic Solutions

“Halfway there”  Photo courtesy of Dale Bentz, RiverLogic Solutions

Once the dam is removed, there is a high probability that populations of American Shad and River Herring will be restored. It may also enhance American Eel migration. As a coldwater fishery, this reach also has significant potential for trout species, as well as Smallmouth Bass.

(Top) Before: Photo of the Columbia Dam before construction. (Bottom) After: Princeton Hydro’s rendering of what the river will look like once the dam is removed.

“It is very exciting to be a part of such a monumental effort for the restoration of the Paulins Kill. This river, once a major migration route for diadromous fish like American Shad, will once again be a nursery for this Delaware River icon,” said Geoffrey Goll, PE, President and co-founder of Princeton Hydro. “The removal of these dams will also restore the functions and values of a riparian corridor and floodplain, eliminate costs to the taxpayer for the maintenance of a dam and lake, and provide additional riverine recreational opportunities. I expect to see the same resilience and positive impact to the Delaware River as the recent barrier removals on another major NJ tributary, the Musconetcong River. It is a win-win for NJ, and with The Nature Conservancy at the helm and expert guidance from American Rivers, it has been an experience of a career.”

This project could not have been possible without the hard work and dedication of the following partner organizations: The Nature Conservancy of New Jersey, American Rivers, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, RiverLogic Solutions, NJDEP Division of Fish and Wildlife Service, and SumCo EcoContracting.

Princeton Hydro has designed, permitted, and overseen the reconstruction, repair, and removal of a dozens of small and large dams in the Northeast. To learn more about our fish passage and dam removal engineering services, visitbit.ly/DamBarrier.


This video from 2016 features the Nature Conservancy’s New Jersey State Director Barbara Brummer, Ph.D. speaking on the Columbia Dam removal. Video credit: NJ Herald.

Musconetcong River Volunteer Cleanup

The Musconetcong Watershed Association (MWA) held its 26th Annual Musconetcong River Cleanup on April 14. Volunteers conducted cleanup efforts at various locations all along the Musconetcong River from its start at Lake Hopatcong down to where it meets the Delaware River. Princeton Hydro, a proud sponsor of the event, has investigated, designed and permitted five dam removals along the Musconetcong River.

Princeton Hydro led a volunteer team near the Warren Glen Dam site and former Hughesville Dam site. The team picked-up garbage along the road and riverbank, and pulled trash from the riverbed. In 2016, we designed and oversaw the Hughesville Dam removal and streambank restoration project, which enabled the return of American shad to the river for the first time in decades.

“We enjoyed the beautiful, warm, and sunny Saturday morning bonding with our Princeton Hydro colleagues and friends, while giving back to the Musconetcong Watershed Association,” said Geoffery Goll, President of Princeton Hydro. “Our successful partnership with MWA on multiple dam removals in critical locations has expedited the restoration and protection of the Musconetcong River.”

MWA hosts cleanups throughout the year. If you have an idea for a volunteer cleanup day, please email info@musconetcong.org.