Winter Events Spotlight: Environmental Conferences & Classes

Over the coming months, Princeton Hydro is teaching courses and presenting at a variety of conferences that explore topics ranging from wetland restoration to cyanotoxins to dam removal:

 

January 2019 – May 2019: Temple University Wetland Ecology Course

Our Vice President Mark Gallagher, along with Founding Principal and Consultant Dr. Steve Souza, is teaching an applied wetland ecology graduate course at Temple University. The 17-week spring semester course, which includes weekly lectures as well as field trips, will provide students with an opportunity to study real-world examples of wetland and riparian restoration and the integration of wetland ecology and restoration design within the context of green infrastructure.

Students will gain an increased understanding of the ecological functions of wetland and riparian ecosystems; be introduced to the principles of applied ecology as related to wetland and riparian ecosystem restoration; learn about the application of wetland ecology in landscape restoration and enhancement projects; get hands-on experience with how to use green infrastructure techniques in urban and suburban settings to control and abate stormwater impacts; and learn about related state and federal rules and regulations.

LEARN MORE

 

January 2019 – May 2019: Delaware Valley University Watershed Management Course

Beginning January 22, Dr. Fred Lubnow, our Director of Aquatic Programs, is teaching a spring semester “Watershed Management” course at Delaware Valley University. Through hands-on laboratory exercises and engaging lectures, the course provides participants with the foundational skills needed to understand the concepts and terminology of hydrologic processes and watersheds. The concepts and processes include evapotranspiration, soil water, infiltration, runoff, and stream flow. Students will also develop skills in environmental awareness, ecological awareness, and land stewardship, which will help them understand the key processes involved in managing watershed resources sustainably.

LEARN MORE

 

January 27-30, 2019: Delaware Estuary Science and Environmental Summit, Cape May, NJ

Every two years, the Partnership for the Delaware Estuary holds a summit that focuses on developing practical solutions to challenges facing our tidal Delaware River and Bay. This year, the theme is Estuary 2029: Saving Our System Through Collaboration. Our Communications Strategist, Dana Patterson, is presenting “Strategic Science Communication & Stakeholder Engagement in the Delaware Estuary” during the Strategic Science Communication Session on Monday, January 28th. 

LEARN MORE

 

March 6-7, 2019: Pennsylvania Lake Management Society’s 29th Annual Conference

This two-day conference covers a wide range of topics such as invasive aquatic plant identification and eradication, harmful algal blooms (HABS), case studies of publicly funded projects and stewardship programs, management or remediation techniques, habitat or fishery improvement, and chemical application techniques. Core and category credits are available for professional chemical applicators for many of the presentations.  We’re proud to sponsor this conference year after year.  Dr. Fred Lubnow, Princeton Hydro’s Director of Aquatic Programs, is giving a presentation about utilizing a watershed implementation plan to address both the external and internal phosphorus loads for Lake Carey, Pennsylvania.  Come visit our booth and say hello to our Aquatics team members. BONUS: Every full conference registration also includes one free year of PALMS membership.

LEARN MORE

 

March 9, 2019: Watershed Congress Along the Schuylkill River

Hosted by the Delaware Riverkeeper Network, this conference is a highly anticipated event for people in the Schuylkill Watershed and beyond interested in understanding, protecting, and restoring their local streams and watersheds. Princeton Hydro is a proud sponsor and exhibitor of this conference. Come check out an hour-long, dynamic session on “Using Values-Driven Communication Strategies To Engage Your Watershed,” hosted by our Communications Strategist, Dana Patterson.

LEARN MORE

 

March 22, 2019: The Pennsylvania Water Works Association’s Northeast District Spring Meeting

The PA-AWWA Northeast District and the Water Works Operators’ Association of Pennsylvania Eastern Section are hosting a Spring 2019 Meeting, which will cover a range of technical topics related to water resource management. Dr. Fred Lubnow is teaching a three-hour course on the monitoring and management of cyanotoxins in sources of raw water.

LEARN MORE

 

Also, Coming Up This Spring:
April 12, 2019: New Jersey Land Conservation Rally

Conservation Innovations in a Changing World is the theme this year for the 23rd Annual NJ Land Conservation Rally. We’re excited to sponsor this one-day educational conference about preserving open space and farmland in New Jersey. Start your morning off with a dynamic marketing session, “Nonprofit Storytelling A-Z: How to Transform Passive Clickers into Action Takers,” hosted by Princeton Hydro’s Communications Strategist, Dana Patterson and National Audubon Society‘s Mid-Level Giving Manager, Lindsay McNamara.  Check out a great afternoon session with our Aquatics Director, Dr. Fred Lubnow, and Senior Aquatic Scientist, Dr. Dr. Jack Szczepanski, who will offer tips on, “The Monitoring and Management of Cyanotoxins in Recreational Lakes and Managing Your Lake’s Fisheries.” And, don’t forget to say “hello” to all of our staff at our exhibitor booth during the conference.

LEARN MORE

 

April 12, 2019: Environmental Business Council of New England Meeting

Princeton Hydro recently joined as a business member of the Environmental Business Council (EBC) of New England, a nonprofit organization dedicated to enhancing business and job growth of both established and emerging environmental and energy businesses. EBC provides member companies with an array of programs, activities, and information to enable them to stay on the cutting edge of environmental and energy technologies, management and regulatory developments. At this EPC meeting, our Director of our New England office, Laura Wildman, PE, and Fluvial Geomorphologist, Paul Woodworth, are hosting a workshop for members on “Dam Removal and Sediment Management.”

LEARN MORE

STAY TUNED FOR MORE EVENT SPOTLIGHTS!

How’s the Fishing? Tips for Managing Your Lake’s Fishery

The fishery of a lake is an intrinsic, incredibly dynamic element of a lake system, and managing a lake’s fishery can be a very complex endeavor. There is actually a lot more to it than simply stocking game fish. Although there is no “one way” in fisheries management, there are key guidelines that can be followed to maximize the recreational potential of your lake’s fishery and increase the success of your fishery management and stocking efforts. Over the past two decades, Princeton Hydro has been working with lake, pond, and reservoir managers to help them to align water quality, fishery, and ecological goals.

Princeton Hydro’s Founder, Dr. Steve Souza, recently gave a presentation on fisheries management at the Spring Meeting of the New Jersey Coalition of Lake Associations (NJCOLA). We’ve compiled a few essential elements from his presentation and have made the complete presentation available for free download.

Let’s dive in!

Benefits of a Healthy Fishery

Recreational fishing is an outdoor activity that can be enjoyed by people of all ages. When children are introduced to fishing, it helps cultivate a connection to the environment, thereby promoting outdoor activity and environmental stewardship among today’s youth.

Anglers have always served as important advocates for the conservation of natural resources. The sale of fishing licenses financially supports wildlife habitat conservation and enhancement as well as the protection and improvement of water quality. This increases the ecological services and functions of lakes and adds to their societal and recreational benefits.

A healthy fishery can have significant positive impacts on water quality. In a balanced, healthy fishery the ratio of forage and game fish affects the entire food web, helping to maintain the proper balance of zooplankton and phytoplankton. The “top down” ecological control associated with a balanced fishery minimizes algae blooms, sustains good water clarity and stable water quality. However, when the fishery is out of balance, the water quality and overall ecological health of the lake often suffers.

Before You Stock, Know Your Lake and Start with a Baseline

Before you do any fish stocking, it’s best to conduct a fishery survey. A fishery survey provides the vital data needed to design a stocking and management plan.

A balanced lake fishery is dependent on good water quality, ample habitat, and the correct ratio of predator and prey fish species. A properly designed and implemented fishery survey generates the data needed to quantify the overall composition of the existing fish community (predator vs. prey), the make-up of the forage (food) base, and the density and robustness of the lake’s top piscivores (prized game fish).

The resulting data helps identify if your fishery is balanced, which fish to stock, and how many of each species to introduce. It will also provide the benchmarks needed to solidify your management goals and, later on, help determine if the goals are being met. To stay on track, we recommend that a comprehensive fishery survey be conducted once every three years. Be sure to use the correct types and combination of “active” and “passive” sampling gear and thoroughly sample both the open water and nearshore areas of the lake.

The survey should include the collection and analysis of water quality data, and the mapping of available habitat. Water column water quality “profiles” provide vital information pertaining to the lake’s thermal and dissolved oxygen properties; key factors for a healthy, vibrant fishery. Here are some basic water quality guidelines:

  • Dissolved oxygen: ≥ 4 mg/L with 6-7 mg/L being ideal
  • For warm water fishery: Uniform temperatures at all depth (minimal or no thermal stratification)
  • For cold water fishery: Deep water temperature of 15 C, and dissolved oxygen ≥ 5 mg/L
  • pH: 6 to 8
  • Clarity: ≥ 3 feet (1 meter) Secchi disc transparency
  • Total Phosphorus: < 0.05 mg/L
  • Chlorophyll a: < 20 µg/L

Water quality sampling should also include an assessment of the lake’s zooplankton and phytoplankton communities, the base of your lake’s food web.

Floating Wetland Island

During the survey, take the time to quantify and map the distribution of existing forage, spawning, and refuge habitat. Lack of adequate habitat can significantly impede the fishery’s sustainability. This begins with the bathymetric mapping of the lake, which is basically an underwater survey of the bottom of the lake. This mapping shows where and how much shallow water versus open water habitat exists.  It can also help identify the location and distribution of important habitat types, such as shoals, rock piles, sandy open areas and natural structures (tree falls and snags). The data also helps determine where to create and introduce habitat, which can be in the form of brush piles, floating wetland islands, and other types of features that increase the spawning, recruitment, and foraging success of the fishery.

Stocking Your Lake

Once the fishery survey is completed, habitat is mapped and water quality analyzed, stocking can begin. In order to determine the specific stocking levels and rates that are right for your waterbody, here are some factors to consider:

  • Ensure your stocking efforts create or augment the correct ratio of predator (game) and prey (forage) fish.

  • Stock cautiously, focusing on a simple composition of predator and prey species. For most warm water lakes, largemouth bass should serve as the top predator and fathead minnow should be the primary prey.

  • Avoid problem fish, such as golden shiner, alewife and brown/black bullhead. Although these fish are often promoted as suitable forage species, they can be easily get overstocked and cause major disruptions of the fishery and to the degradation of water quality.

Go here for a more in-depth look at how to properly stock your fishery.

In Summary

A healthy sustainable fishery isn’t only a function of the types and amounts of fish stocked in a lake; it is directly a function of water quality, the availability and quality of spawning, foraging and refuge habitat, the ratio of forage to predator fish, and the overall composition and balance of the food web.

Begin with a fishery survey; the resulting data enables a correctly planned and implemented stocking program. Conduct routine surveys to assess the status of the fishery and the success of the program. Also, annual water quality testing provides the information needed to make wise pro-active fishery management decisions. It will also provide insights into the lake’s environmental conditions to ensure they are supportive of a healthy, productive and sustainable recreational fishery.

Learn More

If you’re interested in learning more about Princeton Hydro’s fisheries management or lake management services, please contact us.

Click here to download a full copy of Dr. Souza’s presentation, titled “How’s the Fishing? Maximizing the Recreational Potential of Your Lake’s Fishery,” which he recently presented at the NJCOLA Spring Meeting. The presentation provides an in-depth set of guidelines for fishery management, covering topics like data collection methods, habitat creation and enhancement, maximizing habitat quality, and details on various stocking species to consider for your lake.

NJCOLA unites lake communities throughout New Jersey through education and by formulating legislation favorable to the protection and enhancement of the State’s lake resources. NJCOLA meetings, held on a regular basis in the spring and fall, educate members on various topics and issues affecting lake communities ranging from legal to environmental.

The Spring NJCOLA meeting was well attended with over 60 participants representing lakes throughout New Jersey, including a number of lakes that are managed by Princeton Hydro – Lake Mohawk, Lake Hopatcong, White Meadow Lake, Lake Swanannona, Kehmah Lake, Culver Lake and Swartswood Lake.

To learn more about Princeton Hydro’s Pond and Lake services, including water quality sampling, bathymetric surveying, floating wetland islands, and fisheries, visit: http://bit.ly/pondlake 

 

Princeton Hydro Celebrates 20 Years of Science, Engineering, and Design

Princeton Hydro, LLC celebrates two decades of business and
unveils its new look!

Today, Princeton Hydro, LLC is proud to celebrate 20 years since its inception. Princeton Hydro has grown from a small four-person idea operating out of a living room to a 53-person qualified small business with five office locations in the Northeast region. Last year, the firm generated $7.5 million in revenue, as it continues to grow its market share and breadth of ecological and engineering services.

“We are committed to changing the world we live in for the better.  In everything we do, we strive to improve our ecosystem and our quality of life. This firm was originally built upon the ideal of creating a workplace of innovation and passion in the areas of science and engineering,” said Geoffrey Goll, Princeton Hydro’s current President and co-founder. “And, we did not do it alone; the people that were brought aboard helped grow us to what we are today, and will continue to increase our reputation of honesty, integrity, and creativity.”

Two decades ago, Mark Gallagher; Geoffrey Goll, P.E.;  Dr. Stephen Souza; and Dr. Fred Lubnow, along with several staff decided it was time to leave the corporate culture to start a new company focused on the management and restoration of water resources. All four had been employed by a small business named Coastal Environmental Services when it was bought out by the large engineering firm Post Buckley Schuh and Jernigan (PBSJ) in 1996.  None of the “fab four” really fit the “big company” mold, and so the highly regarded wetland scientist, top-notch professional engineer, and well-respected aquatic ecologists formed Princeton Hydro; a company with a mission true to their environmental roots and consistent with their moral compass.

“It’s hard to believe that it has been 20 years since our humble beginning in a small office, a former dance studio lined with mirrors, above a gym in Lambertville. I am proud, yet, still somewhat amazed at how the firm evolved into a well-respected firm of over 50 employees with offices in four states,” stated Mark Gallagher, Vice President and co-founder. “All this from a few important decisions made over breakfast at a Denny’s on Route 1 in 1998 that established a vision for this company. Since that breakfast, we have had the opportunity to implement this vision and to steward the development of Princeton Hydro.”  

After moving from their home office to Lambertville, New Jersey in the same building as the original River Horse Brewing Company location, the company began to grow. At times they struggled to make ends meet, but by supporting each other and celebrating their accomplishments, the team pushed forward. Eventually, they grew so much that they moved down the road to their own office space in Ringoes, and then branched off with offices in southern New Jersey, Eastern Pennsylvania, Connecticut, and Maryland.

The firm and its people have won dozens of awards since its founding; the most recent honor includes the 2018 “Land Ethics Award of Merit” presented by Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve to Princeton Hydro and GreenVest, LLC for their restoration work at the Mullica River Wetland Mitigation Site.

“Over the years we remained true to our goal of doing right by the environment. Princeton Hydro has grown from a humble start-up to a well-recognized and respected leader in the management and restoration of our water, wetlands and natural resources,” said former President and co-founder Dr. Stephen Souza. “Thank you to all that have supported us and have helped us grow. Here’s to another successful 20 years!”

Importantly, it is at this point in the company’s history, the firm’s future is no longer solely dependent on its four founders as its future now relies heavily on the firm’s leadership team and staff to continue the firm’s growth into its next 20 years.  The Princeton Hydro team has the skill sets necessary to conduct highly comprehensive assessments; develop and design appropriate, sustainable solutions; and successfully bring those solutions to fruition. All of our ecological investigations are backed by detailed engineering analyses, and all of our engineering solutions fully account for the ecological and environmental attributes and features of the project site.

“I can’t believe 20 years have passed since the establishment of our firm. This is an absolute testament to Princeton Hydro‘s core principle of bringing together the best, most innovative people to preserve and restore a variety of ecosystems throughout the Mid-Atlantic region,” said Dr. Fred Lubnow, Director of Aquatic Programs and co-founder. “It has been a pleasure to work with Steve, Mark, Geoff and all of the staff at Princeton Hydro over the last 20 years. I’m looking forward to many more!”

As part of Princeton Hydro’s 20th anniversary celebration, the firm unveiled a refreshed brand which includes a new logo, 20th anniversary logo, colors, and style. As we transition into this new look, we’ll be updating our online presence and external communications over the next few months.  This new style matches the evolution of our company since our original “pH” concept was designed in 1998.