6 Tips to Prepare Your Pond for Spring

It’s officially time to say good-bye to winter and “spring” your pond out of hibernation mode. We’ve put together six tips for getting your pond ready for Spring and ensuring it remains healthy all year long.

1. Spring Cleaning Your Pond

The first step in preparing your pond for Spring is to give it a thorough cleaning. Remove leaves, debris and any surface algae that may have accumulated over the winter. For shallow ponds, you may be able to use a net or pond rake to remove debris and sediment from the bottom and along the perimeter of the pond.

2. Inspect Your Pond for Damage

Inspect your pond, including berms, outlet structures and trash racks for any damage that may have occurred over winter due to ice. If you observe any damage, contact Princeton Hydro immediately. One of our engineers can determine if the damage is superficial or requires more significant repairs. Also, if your pond is equipped with an aeration system, before starting it up, contact us to schedule a system inspection. A thorough inspection and proper start-up procedure will ensure the system remains fully and effectively operational for the entire summer.

3. Put Your Pond to the Test

The routine testing of your pond’s water quality is an important part of preventing harmful algae growth, fish kills and other problems. Princeton Hydro professionals can conduct a “Spring start up” water quality analysis of your pond. The resulting data will enable us to develop pro-active, eco-friendly approaches to control nuisance aquatic species and promote environmental conditions supportive of a healthy and productive fishery.

4. Recognize and Reduce Erosion by Aquascaping the Shoreline

It’s important to check the pond’s shoreline for any signs of erosion, which can be easily stabilized by planting native, riparian plants. This is called “aquascaping”. Aquascaping is a great way to beautify the shoreline, stabilize erosion problems, create fish and amphibian habitat, attract pollinating species and song birds, and decrease mosquito breeding.

Our pond and wetland scientists can design and construct a beautiful, highly functional aquascaped shoreline for your pond.

5. Consider Installing an Aeration System

Sub-surface aeration systems eliminate stagnant water and keep your pond thoroughly mixed and properly circulated. Sub-surface aeration systems are the most cost-effective and energy-efficient way to maintain proper pond circulation. Proper aeration enhances fish habitat, minimizes the occurrence of algae blooms, and prevents mosquito breeding. Contact us to discuss if aeration is the right solution for you. If it is, we can design and install the appropriate system for your pond.

6. Have an Ecologically Balanced Pond Management Plan

There is more to pond management than weed and algae treatments alone. There is also a big difference between simple pond maintenance and ecologically-based pond management. A customized pond management plan developed by a Princeton Hydro professional is the “blueprint” you need to proactively care for your pond in a very environmentally responsible manner.

Our Certified Lake and Pond Managers will assess the status of your pond and provide you with an environmentally holistic management plan that is based on the unique physical, hydrologic, chemical and biological attributes of your pond. The plan will identify the causes of your pond’s problems and provide you with the guidance needed to correct these problems. The results are far more environmentally sustainable than simple (and often unnecessary) reactive weed and algae treatments.

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These are just a few tips to get your pond ready for a new season of enjoyment. Princeton Hydro can help you every step of the way. Our success in caring for ponds, lakes and reservoirs is the result of starting with the right plan and applying customized, environmentally-sound management techniques. Please contact us to discuss your pond management needs and to schedule an assessment.

The Westtown Dam and Lake Restoration Project is Now Complete!

westtown-0720161456Princeton Hydro is proud to announce the completion of the Westtown dam restoration and dredging project. For the past 10 years, Princeton Hydro has been working with the Westtown School on dam safety compliance and lake restoration and is the engineer-of-record for the restoration of the Westtown dam and lake.

Westtown School, a hallmark of the Westtown Lake community, initially contracted Princeton Hydro to complete dam inspections and assess the lake in terms of its environmental health and the need for dredging. The completion of this project is a testament to the School’s commitment to its mission of “inspiring and preparing its graduates to be stewards and leaders of a better world”. The School leads by example through practicing dam safety compliance and working to restore the lake for future generations.

westtown-img_2438For the dam, Princeton Hydro completed periodic visual inspections, dam breach and inundation analysis, the preparation of an Emergency Action Plan (EAP), and the Operations and Maintenance Manual.

For rehabilitation, Princeton Hydro designed the dam to be able to pass the 100-year flood event via a completely new drop spillway and outfall barrel, and the construction of an auxiliary/emergency cast-in-place stepped spillway. As part of the rehabilitation of the dam, Princeton Hydro surveyed and designed the dredging of 56,000 cubic yards of sediment, the rehabilitation of the lake’s sedimentation forebay and spillway, and the enlargement of a culvert on Westtown Road, immediately downstream of the dam. The culvert replacement was required due to the closure of two secondary outlets on the dam and corresponding culverts below Westtown Road.

westtown-0713161041aThis project also required a variety of permits, including a Chester County soil erosion and sediment control plan approval, a Dam Safety construction permit, a PADEP General Permit 11 for the road crossing, and a US Army Corps of Engineers Individual Permit in compliance with the Federal Clean Water Act.

Additionally, Princeton Hydro successfully navigated interests for two species of concern: the bog turtle (federal and state listed) habitat and red-bellied turtle (state listed) populations.

Following design and permitting, Princeton Hydro provided construction documentation and administration, including the review of shop drawings, monitoring soil compaction, inspecting concrete pours and collecting concrete test cylinders for break tests (ACI certified engineers), completing monthly progress reports, reviewing payment requests and change orders, and attend bi-weekly project meetings with the client. Flyway Excavating, the contractor for the project, worked seamlessly with the School and Princeton Hydro to accomplish the overall goals of the design.

The Westtown project is an excellent example of Princeton Hydro’s turnkey engineering, permitting, and construction administration services. Please contact us if you have a similar project you need assistance with or have questions about.

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*Photos courtesy of Flyway Excavating.

 

 

 

Deal Lake Improves Water Quality on a Sustainable Basis

Success Spotlight: Deal Lake Watershed Protection Plan Implementation Project

Deal Lake Commission, Interlaken, New Jersey

Deal Lake is the largest of New Jersey’s coastal lakes, encompassing 155 acres and spanning over 27 miles of shoreline. The lake’s 4,400-acre watershed is highly developed, with the majority of development dating back to the 1940s-1960s. As a result, stormwater management, particularly with respect to water quality and volume management, is largely lacking.

Since 1980, the Deal Lake Commission (DLC) has served as the State-appointed steward of the lake.  Princeton Hydro secured the DLC $450,000 in 319(h) funding to implement the lake’s New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection-approved Watershed Protection Plan. The 319(h) funding was used by the DLC to conduct three projects designed to decrease stormwater-based pollutant loading, improve the lake’s water quality, and restore heavily eroded sections of the shoreline.

Asbury Park Comstock Street MTD

Screen Shot 2016-05-23 at 9.20.04 AMThis project involved the installation of a manufactured treatment device (MTD). MTDs are very effective “retrofit” solutions that can be used to address stormwater issues even in highly developed areas. The MTD installation was complicated by site constraints including sub-surface infrastructure. Post-installation field testing and STEPL modeling conducted by Princeton Hydro confirmed that the MTD significantly decreased the pollutant loading from one of the lake’s major stormwater outfalls.

 

Colonial Terrace Golf Course Bioretention BMPs
Screen Shot 2016-05-23 at 9.25.17 AM

Princeton Hydro conducted the field testing, engineering design, and permitting of three bio-infiltration basins constructed at the Colonial Terrace Golf Course (CTGC). Post-project-completion field testing showed each basin is capable of fully infiltrating the runoff generated by storms as great as 1.5 inches per hour. In addition, over 300 feet of eroded shoreline was stabilized with native plants. Doing so helped create a dense buffer that inhibits passage of Canada geese from the lake onto the golf course.

 

Asbury Park Boat Launch Shoreline Stabilization

Princeton Hydro developed a bio-engineering design for the stabilization of a badly eroded 250-foot segment section of shoreline adjacent to the Asbury Park boat launch. Coir fiber logs were used in conjunction with native plant material. As with the CTGC planting, help was provided by local volunteers and the DLC commissioners. The final element of the project involved the construction of a bioretention rain garden to control the runoff from the boat launch parking area. Signage was also installed to inform the public about the project and the benefits of shoreline naturalization.

 

The Deal Lake Watershed Protection Plan Implementation Project proved that despite Deal Lake being located in a highly urbanized watershed, it is possible to implement cost-effective green infrastructure and stormwater retrofit solutions capable of significantly decreasing pollutant loading to the lake.  These measures are part of the DLC’s continued efforts to utilize environmentally sustainable techniques to improve the lake’s water quality. This project won a North American Lake Management Society Technical Merit Award.

For more information about this and other Princeton Hydro projects, please contact us!

Really, it’s the least we could do.

Originally posted August 27, 2010 at phfieldnotes.blogspot.com.

There has been a growing number of people realizing that sustainable stormwater design can fill another very important function: habitat creation. In many regions where open space it at a premium and the creation of green space in urban areas has become paramount, using stormwater management facilities – large and small – to provide precious habitat opportunities is making more and more sense. In fact, some would argue (us included) that it’s a no-brainer.

Beyond planting with natives, maintaining naturalized stormwater facilities reduces reliance on fossil fuels, improves air quality, maximizes pollution reduction, and can provide increased infiltration. Sadly, the push back to naturalization can be fierce. Concerns that anything but closely cropped lawn will harbor threats to human health and well-being are far-ranging – we’ve heard it all: rats, snakes, pollen (gasp!), and perverts. Yes; perverts.

Sadly, the sterilization of our environment has led to the widespread collapse of ecosystems and left us engaged in an endless war with invasive species. Humanity’s lack of understanding that we rely on a healthy environment for our own health and well-being is quickly sending us down a slippery slope; once we lower our species diversity and richness, it won’t recover in this millennium.

The least we could do is offer up our stormwater spaces to buck the trend.

Lauren Kovacs, LEED AP
Environmental Designer