New Video Celebrates 50th Anniversary of Wild & Scenic Rivers Act


Communities across the nation are preparing to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act. This landmark legislation passed by Congress in October 1968 safeguards the free-flowing character of rivers by precluding them from being dammed, while allowing the public to enjoy them. It encourages river management and promotes public participation in protecting streams.

As part of the celebration, the National Park Service released a new video highlighting a handful of ‘Wild and Scenic’ designated rivers in the Northeast – the Farmington, Sudbury, Assabet, Concord, and Musconetcong Rivers – along with the organizations and community volunteers who work together to protect and care for these rivers.

Princeton Hydro is proud to work with two of the river stewards featured in the video: Musconetcong Watershed Association (MWA) and Farmington River Watershed Association (FRWA).

The Musconetcong River:

Designated ‘Wild and Scenic’ in 2006, the Musconetcong River is a 45.7-mile-long tributary of the Delaware River in northwestern New Jersey.

Princeton Hydro has been working with MWA in the areas of river restoration, dam removal, and engineering consulting since 2003 when the efforts to remove the Gruendyke Mill Dam in Hackettstown, NJ began. To date, Princeton Hydro has worked with MWA to remove five dams on the Musconetcong River, the most recent being the Hughesville Dam.

As noted in the video, the removal of these dams, especially the Hughesville dam, was a major milestone in restoring migratory fish passage along the Musconetcong. Only a year after the completion of the dam removal, American shad returned to the “Musky” for the first time in 250 years.

“The direction the river is moving bodes well for its recovery,” said Princeton Hydro President Geoff Goll, P.E., who was interviewed in the 50th anniversary video. “This multidisciplinary approach using ecology and engineering, paired with a dynamic stakeholder partnership, lead to a successful river restoration, where native fish populations returned within a year. ”

The Farmington River:

The Upper Farmington River, designated as ‘Wild and Scenic’ in 1994, stretches 14-miles through Connecticut starting above Riverton through the New Hardford/Canton town line. The river is important for outdoor recreation and provides critical habitat for countless wildlife.

Credit: FWRA.orgBack in 2012, Princeton Hydro worked with the FRWA and its project partners to remove the Spoonville Dam. Built in 1899 on the site of a natural 25-foot drop in the riverbed, the dam was originally a hydropower facility. The hurricanes and flood of 1955 breached the dam, opening a 45-foot gap and scattering massive dam fragments in the riverbed downstream. The remnant of the main dam persisted for decades as a 128-foot long, 25-foot high obstacle in the channel. The river poured through the breach in a steep chute that stopped American shad from proceeding further upstream to spawn.

The project was completed, from initial site investigation through engineering assessment and final design, in just six months. The dam removal helped to restore historic fish migrations in the Farmington River (including the American shad) and increase recreation opportunities.

Wild & Scenic Rivers Act:

Credit: NPS.govAs of December 2014 (the last designation), the National ‘Wild and Scenic’ System protects 12,734 miles of 208 rivers in 40 states and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico; this is a little more than one-quarter of 1% of the nation’s rivers. By comparison, more than 75,000 large dams across the country have modified at least 600,000 miles, or about 17%, of American rivers.

In honor of the 50th anniversary of the Act and in an effort to designate many more miles of river as ‘Wild and Scenic,’ four federal agencies and four nonprofit groups are coordinating nationwide events and outreach. Managing agencies are the Bureau of Land ManagementFish and Wildlife ServiceForest Service, and National Park Service, along with American RiversAmerican WhitewaterRiver Network and River Management Society. Go here for more info:

Employee Spotlight: Meet Our New Team Members

Princeton Hydro is thrilled to announce the expansion of our growing business with the addition of 10 team members who possess a wealth of experience and qualifications in a variety of fields related to water resource management.

“The addition of these professionals is attributable to the successful teaming relationships we have developed and grown with our clients, and is our commitment to investing in meeting their respective missions,” said Princeton Hydro President Geoff Goll.  “We’re proud have such talented experts in their fields join our team, who also share our ideals of creativity, ingenuity, quality, and teamwork.”


Meet Our New Team Members:


Emily Bjorhus, Environmental Scientist

Emily is an Environmental Scientist with expertise in environmental permitting and compliance, wetland and stream ecology, and stormwater management. She coordinates, leads and assists with state environmental permitting programs and NEPA compliance and documentation, including preparation of Federal and state permit applications, Endangered Species Act 7 consultations, and Federal Energy Regulatory Commission environmental review processes. She also conducts a variety of environmental field investigations such as wetland and waterbody delineations.  Read more.


Stephen Duda, EIT, Project Engineer

Stephen is a civil engineer with expertise in grading and stormwater design, drafting, permitting, soil testing and construction inspection.  He has experience working on multiple aspects of land development projects, construction management and  municipal engineering.  He holds an an Associate degree in General Engineering and a second in Engineering Technologies/CAD, as well as a B.S. in Civil Engineering from Rowan University. Read more. 



Shaun Flite, EIT, Civil Engineer

Shaun is a Civil Engineer who has provided over 5 years of consulting services to assist with planning, design, and permitting of projects involving land development, stormwater management, water & wastewater utility systems, and pollution control. He is a graduate of Penn State where he earned his Bachelor of Science in Environmental Engineering, with an emphasis in hydrology, hydraulics, and water quality/treatment. Read more.



George Fowler, PE,  Water Resource Engineer

George is a Water Resource Engineer with an expertise in natural system’s features and functions, river engineering designs and geomorphic investigations.  Well versed in U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and NRCS engineering manuals, he seeks to work with people who desire river engineering solutions that follow sound engineering practices, improve the aquatic environment and have low to no maintenance costs.  His designs have ranged from traditional flood protection features (earthen berms and dams) to fish habitat enhancement (engineered log jams and roughened log stream bank toes).  Read more.


Casey Hurt, PE, Geotechnical Project Manager

Casey is a licensed Professional Engineer with over 6 years of experience working in Geotechnical Engineering. He maintains a wide range of professional responsibilities for the firm including subsurface explorations, development of geotechnical laboratory testing programs, shallow and deep foundation analysis and design, settlement evaluation, earth retaining system design, slope stability analyses, and management of geotechnical field operations. He has extensive experience with stormwater infiltration and dam safety compliance. Read more.


Elizabeth Kowalsky, Assistant Coordinator

Liz earned her B.A. in Communications with a concentration in Public Relations from Stockton University. She has a background in working with public relations firms in the areas of technology, pharmaceuticals, outdoor products/safety and family wellness. Read more.




Dana Patterson, Communications Strategist

Dana is a passionate environmental communicator who brings a strong mix of diverse stakeholder engagement experience, coupled with values-based communication strategy. She specializes branding, marketing, and digital media strategy, and strives to enhance the mission and values of Princeton Hydro. She earned her Master of Environmental Management from Yale University’s School of Forestry and Environmental Studies where she focused on strategies for climate change and wildlife conservation communication.  Read more.



Natalie Rodrigues, EIT, CPESC-IT, Staff Engineer

Natalie is a staff engineer with a focus in water resources engineering. She assists with various projects that span several topics, including stormwater management, ecosystem restoration, and dam safety. Natalie is a recent graduate from SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry where she earned her Bachelor of Science in Environmental Resources Engineering with a focus in water resources.  Read more.



Jack Szczepanski, PhD, Senior Aquatics Scientist

Jack has a range of experience from establishing baseline assessment for fish populations to managing coastal wetland resilience projects to developing ecosystem-wide monitoring plans. Jack earned his PhD from URI by studying fish feeding ecology and trophic dynamics across marine ecosystems. He also has academic background in biomechanics, wetland and estuarine ecology, and natural resource applications of conservation biology.  Read more.



Thomas Wilkes, PE, Senior Project Manager

Tom is a Professional Civil Engineer specializing in municipal, civil, and environmental engineering consulting services primarily in Pennsylvania and Delaware. He is an accomplished and multi-talented Municipal Engineer with more than 10 years of significant experience in planning, scheduling, managing and administration of public works projects, and providing maintenance support for municipal utility systems (stormwater, sanitary, sewer, and water). Read more.




Stay tuned for more!

Musconetcong Watershed Association Presents Princeton Hydro President with Prestigious “Friend of the River” Award


Musconetcong Watershed Association (MWA) held a dinner to celebrate its 25th anniversary as well as the 150th anniversary of the Asbury Grist Mill, which the MWA is working to restore. The evening included a cocktail hour, a buffet dinner, silent auction, remarks by the MWA President Tish Lascelle and Executive Director Alan Hunt, and a presentation of awards.

The MWA presented Princeton Hydro PresiPhoto by Tish Lascelle, President, Musconetcong Watershed Associationdent Geoff Goll, PE with the “Friend of the River” Award. This award, which has only been given seven times in MWA’s 25 years of service, recognizes individuals who have made a significant and sustainable difference in the Watershed and helped to advance its mission. Recipients of the Award have also demonstrated outstanding leadership through their volunteer efforts or partnerships with MWA.

Geoff was honored to receive the award alongside Paul Kenney of the National Park Service and Richard C. Cotton, a Managing Partner of the Hawk Pointe Golf Club and Asbury Farms Real Estate. Paul was assigned the Musconetcong River in late 2003 and was instrumental in obtaining the Musconetcong River’s Wild and Scenic Designation in 2006. He has continued to be an excellent resource of the National Park Service.  Richard is a founding member of the MWA’s Board of Trustee’s and continues to serve on the Board. He has dedicated his professional life to striking a balance between economic growth with environmental protection.

Geoff has been working with MWA in the areas of river restoration, dam removal, and engineering consulting since 2003, when the efforts to remove the Gruendyke Mill Dam in Hackettstown, NJ began. He has since worked with the Princeton Hydro team to remove five dams on the Musconetcong River, the most recent being the Hughesville Dam

MWA is an independent, non-profit organization dedicated to protecting and improving the quality of the Musconetcong River and its Watershed, including its natural and cultural resources. Members of the organization are part of a network of individuals, families and companies that care about the Musconetcong River and its watershed, and are dedicated to improving the watershed resources through public education and awareness programs, river water quality monitoring, promotion of sustainable land management practices and community involvement.

During the anniversary dinner, participants also got a sneak peek of a new video from the National Park Service that is set for public release in 2018. The video celebrates the upcoming 50th anniversary of the Federal Wild and Scenic Rivers Act, under which the Musconetcong River is protected, and explores the importance of free-flowing rivers and why Americans treasure them. Representing Princeton Hydro at the awards dinner were Vice President Mark Gallagher, his wife Jennifer, Geoff and his wife Amy, and Director of Engineering Services Mary Paist-Goldman, PE.












Princeton Hydro Participates in Rutgers Engineering Honors Council Competition

Princeton Hydro President Geoff Goll, P.E. participated as an alumni judge in the Rutgers Engineering Honors Council (REHC) Annual Case Competition.

The REHC Case Competition is an annual event in which students are given a case detailing a Rutgers-related issue and have a limited amount of time to analyze the case problem, develop a solution, and present their plans to a panel of alumni judges.

The judges critique the group and individuals on presentation, creativity, participation, feasibility of solution, and additional criteria. The competition is divided into two tiers, where the winners of each grouping of presentations then present to determine a final winner.

Over the past three years, more than one hundred students have participated and have included deans, alumni, administrators, and faculty in the development of the competition. This year, the judging panel incorporated four alumni, including Goll, who judged separate groups of three teams, and then joined together with the other judges to critique the final round of presentations.   

“It was a truly wonderful experience,” said Goll. “It’s so encouraging to see such eager and bright young minds that are on their way to becoming future engineering leaders.”

REHC, founded in 2011, is composed of Honors Academy and Honors College representatives and honor society presidents to provide a uniform voice to all sectors of the honors community in the School of Engineering. Students find unique opportunities to be mentored by industry professionals, engage with successful alumni, and exchange talents with their peers. 

Goeff Goll, Civil Engineering Class of 1990, brings extensive experience in water resources and geotechnical engineering to the table. He is highly experienced in stream restoration, dam removal, the design of large retaining structures, and building foundations and stormwater management systems.


Princeton Hydro Team Trained in USACE MII Cost Estimating Software

Congratulations to Amy McNamara and James Hunt of Princeton Hydro who received their certificates of completion for the in-depth training of the October 2017 MCACES (Micro-Computer Aided Cost Estimating System), 2nd Generation (MII) Training Course in Atlanta, Georgia. MCACES is an integrated cost estimating system that meets the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) requirements for preparing cost estimates for civil works projects.

This 32-hour course provided an in-depth look at the software application and its components which are used to build detailed construction cost estimates. In a classroom setting, Amy and Jim learned how to prepare and execute computerized cost estimates using parametric worksheets, quantity linking, and assemblies. Our engineering team now has the capability to navigate through the MII software and libraries to create a project, cost items, crews, labor and equipment. Amy and Jim understand how to work with database functions to create site-specific unit prices, modify equipment costs for project specific circumstances, and adjust crew for overtime and shift differential.

Now being used by many of the USACE districts, it will soon be a requirement for all USACE districts to use MII, as well as all architect-engineering (A-E) firms performing design work for the USACE.

“We are looking forward to using the program to help our Federal partners meet their mission objectives,” stated Geoff Goll, President of Princeton Hydro. “The completion of such training efforts continues our commitment to supporting the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ efforts in the North Atlantic Division and beyond.”

Princeton Hydro President Gives Keynote Address

Princeton Hydro President Geoff Goll, P.E. gave the keynote address to kick-off the University of Wisconsin-Madison‘s Master of Engineering Management (MEM) 2017 Residency for 1st and 2nd-year students.

As a 2013 graduate of the MEM program and a leader in the industry, Geoff was invited to give the presentation and offer to students his perspectives, insights and advice on how to transition from being a technical expert to a role in leadership and management.

A personal message from Geoff:
“I was very honored to present to the students and faculty of the MEM program, as they are a prestigious group of professionals that represent many sectors in the engineering industry. The MEM program provided me with the tools to develop as a manager and leader at my firm, and I was very glad to be able to give back by sharing my experiences. I was also very excited to share the story of the firm’s history, which Dr. Stephen Souza, Mark Gallagher and I built from a small 7-person firm started in Steve’s attic, to the multi-state, nearly 50-person firm we are today.”

The UW-Madison College of Engineering ranked in the Top 20 Online Engineering Management Degree Programs. This 30-credit hour, cohort-style program is designed for mid-career engineers, focusing on how to strengthen the skills and develop the knowledge needed to lead organizations, teams, and resources in the engineering field. Each summer, students are required to participate in a weeklong residency course on the Madison campus to conclude summer coursework and lead into the fall courses.

Princeton Hydro Announces Leadership Transition