Princeton Hydro Opens a New Office

We are pleased to announce the opening of our new Mid-Atlantic office located in Millersville, Maryland, allowing us to better serve existing and future clients throughout Maryland and Delaware. With the addition of this new location, Princeton Hydro now has five full-service offices from Maryland to Connecticut

For the past nine years Princeton Hydro, LLC has provided pond and lake management services to clients throughout Maryland and Delaware. We are now pleased to announce the official opening of our Mid-Atlantic office, located in Millersville, MD. From this strategic location we will be able to provide both existing and future clients in the Maryland and Delaware region with a full suite of services including but not limited to:

Over the past 20 years Princeton Hydro has become the recognized industry leader in the management and restoration of lakes and ponds. Our certified lake and pond managers are backed by a dedicated staff of water resource engineers, wetland scientists and fishery biologists who have the expertise and experience to solve even the most difficult lake and pond problems.

To commemorate the opening of our Maryland office, Princeton Hydro is extending discounted prices to new and existing clients in Maryland and Delaware for 2017 lake and pond management services. If you would like to schedule a no-cost, no-obligation site consultation, please contact Scott Churm, Director of Aquatic Operations, at schurm@princetonhydro.com.

We appreciate your business!

 

Lake Management and Restoration in the Hudson River Valley

Lake Management Planning in Action
at Sleepy Hollow Lake and Truesdale Lake

The Hudson River Valley encompasses 7,228 square miles along the eastern edge of New York State. It comprises 3 million residents, 133 communities and 553 significant freshwater lakes, ponds and reservoirs. Princeton Hydro has worked with municipalities and organizations in the Hudson River Valley for over 18 years actively restoring, protecting and managing waterbodies throughout the area.

Princeton Hydro is currently implementing customized Lake Management Plans at two waterbodies in the Hudson River Valley: Sleepy Hollow Lake, a 324-acre drinking water reservoir/recreational lake located in Green County, NY and Truesdale Lake, an 83-acre lake in Northern Westchester County, NY.

Sleepy Hollow Lake

Stretching over two and a half miles long and reaching depths of approximately 70 feet, Sleepy Hollow Lake is a NYSDEC Class “A” drinking water reservoir that provides potable water for the Sleepy Hollow community. The lake is also extensively used by residents for swimming, boating and water-skiing. And, it is recognized as an outstanding large-mouth bass and white crappie (current New York State record holder) fishery!

Princeton Hydro was hired by the Association of Property Owners (APO) at Sleepy Hollow Lake to develop a comprehensive lake management plan. The first step involved an in-depth analysis of the biological, chemical and physical attributes of the lake, with the goal being to generate a database that can be used to better understand the interactions defining the Sleepy Hollow Lake ecosystem.

The data collection and investigation phase includes:

  • Watershed Investigation: an in-depth assessment of the major and minor tributaries and road network in order to identify areas of stream bank and ditch erosion; sources of both sediment and nutrient loading to the lake
  • Bathymetric Survey: the accurate mapping of water depths and the quantification of the amount of accumulated, unconsolidated sediment present in the lake
  • Fisheries & Food Web Study: the collection of fish and plankton data for the purpose of creating a comprehensive fisheries management program focused on managing the lake’s outstanding fishery, further promoting the ecological balance of the lake, and enhancing lake water quality
  • Aquatic Plant Mapping: the development of detailed maps identifying the plant species present in the lake along with their relative abundance and distribution throughout the lake, but especially within the shallower coves
  • Hydrologic & Pollutant Budget: the computation of the lake’s hydrologic budget and pollutant loading budget. The hydrologic budget represents the water balance of the lake and is an estimate of all of the inputs and losses of water. The pollutant budget represents an estimate of the amount of nitrogen and phosphorus entering the lake from various sources. These data are used to evaluate the effectiveness of lake management options, enabling us to determine the best, most ecologically sound and most cost-effective approach to protect and improve the lake’s water quality now and into the future.

Princeton Hydro is now in the process of utilizing all of the data developed during the investigation phase of the project to create a comprehensive Lake Management Plan that will be used to guide the APO’s future lake restoration and protection initiatives. The Lake Management Plan and supporting data will also be used by Princeton Hydro on behalf of the APO to seek grant funding for various lake and watershed restoration projects.

Princeton Hydro is also overseeing the aquatic plant management program at Sleepy Hollow Lake, the focus of which is to control invasive plant species in a manner consistent with and complimentary of the lake’s overall ecological enhancement.

Truesdale Lake

At Truesdale Lake, Princeton Hydro is working with the Truesdale Lake Property Owners Association (TLPOA) to develop a comprehensive Lake Management Plan. The Plan provides a detailed project implementation roadmap for TLPOA, including recommendations for priority ranking of particular activities and restoration measures. A key element of the Plan are the short-term (1-year) and long-term (5-year) water quality and problematic algae and invasive aquatic plant control goals. Another highlight of the Plan is the review of Federal, State, County and local grants, programs and initiatives that may provide funding for identified lake and watershed projects.

During the Plan’s development, Princeton Hydro has provided the TLPOA with lake management consultation services such as community education initiatives, the coordination of NYSDEC permitting activities associated with the implementation of lake restoration measures, and the oversight and administration of an aquatic weed management program at the lake.

Earlier this year, Truesdale Lake experienced excessive aquatic weed growth, which significantly reduced the water quality, recreational use and aesthetics of the lake. Princeton Hydro utilized its Truxor, an eco-friendly, amphibious machine, to cut and remove the nuisance weed growth from the lake. This program helped reduce the negative impacts to the lake and lake users caused by the dense weed growth. Future use of the Truxor to remove invasive weeds is already part of the long-term Lake Management Plan for TLPOA. The Truxor will be used in concert with other measures to control invasive weed growth and restore a more balanced native aquatic plant community.

For more information about Princeton Hydro’s work in the Hudson River Valley or to discuss your project goals, please contact us.

Success Spotlight: Strawbridge Lake

The Princeton Hydro team recently completed a spadderdock removal project at Strawbridge Lake, a 33-acre lake considered to be one of the most valuable open space assets in Moorestown, New Jersey.

Spadderdock is an invasive aquatic plant found in lakes and ponds throughout the Eastern US. It can grow quickly and reach large populations totally covering the water surface and shading the bottom so that nothing else can grow. Spadderdock can eliminate important, native plant species and clog waterways.

Princeton Hydro utilized its Truxor DM 5045, an eco-friendly amphibious machine, to dig up the plants at their roots and remove them from the lake. Check out the below before and after photos to see the dramatic transformation. Special kudos to our Senior Scientist J.P. Bell for a job well done! Read more about pesticide-free #lakemanagement solutions!

Client Spotlight: Roaring Brook Lake, Putnam Valley, NY

A Comprehensive Lake Management Plan Designed by Princeton Hydro

roaring-brook-lake Since 1998, Princeton Hydro has been working with the Town of Putnam Valley, often referred to as the Town of Lakes, to restore and maintain its waterbodies. The most recent area of focus is Roaring Brook Lake, a 115-acre man-made lake surrounded by a wooded landscape community that includes 260+ homes. The lake provides a variety of recreational opportunities for boaters, anglers, swimmers and outdoor lovers and is the center point of the Roaring Brook Lake District.

The Town of Putnam Valley and the Roaring Brook Lake District hired Princeton Hydro to conduct a thorough analysis of the lake’s ecological health, identify problems affecting the quality of the lake, and develop a detailed plan to improve and protect the lake. Specifically, Princeton Hydro will implement a detailed assessment of the lake that involves water quality monitoring, bathymetric mapping (measurement of lake depth and sediment thickness), aquatic plant surveys, and quantification of the lake’s hydrologic and pollutant budgets. These data will be utilized collectively to produce a comprehensive management plan for Roaring Brook Lake and its watershed.

Water Quality Monitoring

Water quality data are used to interpret the existing chemistry of the lake, identify water quality trends, pinpoint problems and assess nutrient levels.

At Roaring Brook Lake, Princeton Hydro will specifically collect in-situ data from the surface to the bottom of the water column. The resulting temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH and conductivity data will be used in combination with laboratory generated data to assess the lake’s thermal stability and investigate the potential for internal phosphorus loading. In addition, samples will be collected to identify phytoplankton and zooplankton in the lake; some of the plankton is considered a nuisance while others are considered valuable relative to the lake’s food web.

Bathymetric Assessment

The bathymetric assessment will generate accurate lake water depth, and provide sediment thickness and distribution data for the entire body of water. These data are then used to evaluate the need for dredging, asses how and where aquatic plants become colonized and other management options that can affect long-term decisions regarding the restoration and protection of Roaring Brook Lake. The bathymetric data are also used in the various trophic models that help predict the lake’s response to incoming nutrients.

Specifically, Princeton Hydro will utilize hydrographic surveying methods to conduct the bathymetric assessment of Roaring Brook Lake. A specialized dual frequency fathometer will be used to measure water depth and the thickness of the unconsolidated sediment present throughout the lake. The fathometer is directly tied into GPS, so data are consistently collected at the exact position of the survey transects. The GPS data and accompanying water depth data will be placed into a GIS format for the generation of morphometric data and bathymetric maps of the lake.

Aquatic Plant Mapping

Aquatic plants hold sediments in place, reduce erosion and provide habitat for fish and other important wildlife and insects. Although native aquatic plants are imperative to a lake’s health, an overabundance of these plants and the presence of invasive plants can have very negative impacts.

Princeton Hydro will be conducting a complete mapping of the aquatic plant community within Roaring Brook Lake to identify the plant species present in the lake, their relative abundance and location, and provide a basis for future evaluation of changes in the plant community. This data will greatly inform lake management activities moving forward. Additionally, with this data, Princeton Hydro will be able to assess the effectiveness of the resident grass carp – currently stocked in the lake – in keeping the submerged vegetation under control.

 

Hydrologic and Pollutant Budget

The hydrologic budget represents the water balance of a lake, accounting on an annual scale for all of the inputs and losses of water. The hydrologic data is used extensively in conducting trophic state analyses and is important in determining the feasibility and utility of many in-lake restoration techniques. At Roaring Brook Lake, Princeton Hydro will investigate and quantify four key components of the hydrologic budget, including direct precipitation, overland runoff (stormwater, snowmelt, etc.), tributary inflow and groundwater seepage.

Once the hydrologic budget is complete and land-use has been categorized and quantified, a pollutant budget can then be developed. The development of a detailed pollutant budget is a critical component of any lake management plan. For the purpose of the Roaring Brook Lake study, the term pollutant refers to the nutrients nitrogen and phosphorus as well as total suspended solids. The pollutant budget represents a quantification of the input of pollutants from various sources to the lake. Because the amount of nitrogen and phosphorus present in the lake stimulates eutrophication and results in water quality impacts, proper quantification of the nutrient load is critical for the development of a site-specific and cost effective management plan.

Data Analysis

The data analysis for Roaring Brook Lake will focus on identifying an acceptable in-lake condition (i.e. specific level of algal biomass in the lake) and correlate this to the lake’s annual phosphorus load through a robust water quality model.

The data analysis will involve the review of both historical and current data and will be used to identify correlations and relationships between existing pollutant concentrations/loads and unacceptable water quality conditions (i.e. algal blooms, high rates of turbidity, nuisance densities of aquatic plants, etc.). Water quality thresholds and goals will be established for assessing the long-term progress of the lake management plan.

Lake Management Plan

roaring-brook-lake-1Properly managing your lakes and ponds starts with developing a customized management plan and involves a holistic approach to ensure continued success.

A good management plan is informed by substantial data collection and analysis (as described above); includes any necessary permit requirements and a proposed timetable for implementation; provides recommendations for priority ranking of particular activities and restoration measures; and discusses predicted benefits of the plan’s implementation and how each activity is linked to the established water quality goals. A well-crafted and thorough lake management plan will also include a review of the various Federal, State, County and local grants, programs and initiatives that may provide funding for the identified in-lake and watershed projects.

• • •

Princeton Hydro’s work with Roaring Brook Lake marks the 16th project they’ve conducted for the Town of Putnam Valley. Princeton Hydro’s proven success in watershed management stems from the cumulative training and experience of its staff, and its ability to develop watershed management solutions that are both practical and effective, which has led to the firm’s very high success rate in improving water quality.

If you’re interested in developing a customized, comprehensive management plan for your lake or pond, please contact us!

 

 

 

 

The Westtown Dam and Lake Restoration Project is Now Complete!

westtown-0720161456Princeton Hydro is proud to announce the completion of the Westtown dam restoration and dredging project. For the past 10 years, Princeton Hydro has been working with the Westtown School on dam safety compliance and lake restoration and is the engineer-of-record for the restoration of the Westtown dam and lake.

Westtown School, a hallmark of the Westtown Lake community, initially contracted Princeton Hydro to complete dam inspections and assess the lake in terms of its environmental health and the need for dredging. The completion of this project is a testament to the School’s commitment to its mission of “inspiring and preparing its graduates to be stewards and leaders of a better world”. The School leads by example through practicing dam safety compliance and working to restore the lake for future generations.

westtown-img_2438For the dam, Princeton Hydro completed periodic visual inspections, dam breach and inundation analysis, the preparation of an Emergency Action Plan (EAP), and the Operations and Maintenance Manual.

For rehabilitation, Princeton Hydro designed the dam to be able to pass the 100-year flood event via a completely new drop spillway and outfall barrel, and the construction of an auxiliary/emergency cast-in-place stepped spillway. As part of the rehabilitation of the dam, Princeton Hydro surveyed and designed the dredging of 56,000 cubic yards of sediment, the rehabilitation of the lake’s sedimentation forebay and spillway, and the enlargement of a culvert on Westtown Road, immediately downstream of the dam. The culvert replacement was required due to the closure of two secondary outlets on the dam and corresponding culverts below Westtown Road.

westtown-0713161041aThis project also required a variety of permits, including a Chester County soil erosion and sediment control plan approval, a Dam Safety construction permit, a PADEP General Permit 11 for the road crossing, and a US Army Corps of Engineers Individual Permit in compliance with the Federal Clean Water Act.

Additionally, Princeton Hydro successfully navigated interests for two species of concern: the bog turtle (federal and state listed) habitat and red-bellied turtle (state listed) populations.

Following design and permitting, Princeton Hydro provided construction documentation and administration, including the review of shop drawings, monitoring soil compaction, inspecting concrete pours and collecting concrete test cylinders for break tests (ACI certified engineers), completing monthly progress reports, reviewing payment requests and change orders, and attend bi-weekly project meetings with the client. Flyway Excavating, the contractor for the project, worked seamlessly with the School and Princeton Hydro to accomplish the overall goals of the design.

The Westtown project is an excellent example of Princeton Hydro’s turnkey engineering, permitting, and construction administration services. Please contact us if you have a similar project you need assistance with or have questions about.

westtown-p1260748

*Photos courtesy of Flyway Excavating.

 

 

 

Stormwater Management for Lake Communities

A Presentation by Princeton Hydro President Dr. Steve Souza

Available for Free Download

Princeton Hydro President, Dr. Steve Souza, spent Saturday morning with over 50 members of the New Jersey Coalition of Lakes, an organization that promotes the management of healthy lake ecosystems. Together they discussed many different stormwater management options for lake communities.

Dr. Souza’s presentation covered the principles of stormwater management and the importance of incorporating stormwater management into lake restoration plans. He also provided examples of simple, homeowner-scale runoff control techniques, as well as a sampling of Princeton Hydro designed and constructed large-scale, community-based stormwater management systems. Download a copy of the full presentation here or below!

The meeting hosts, Lake Mohawk Country Club and Lake Mohawk Preservation Foundation, have implemented a number of local stormwater enhancement projects. To check out some examples, go here.

To learn more about Princeton Hydro’s stormwater management and lake restoration services, visit our website or contact us!

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