Creative, Timely Solutions Lead to Successful Dam Repair in Medford Lakes

By Kevin Yezdimer, P.E. and Jim Hunt, P.E.

Just 25 miles east of Philadelphia, on the edge of the New Jersey Pinelands region, sits a network of 22 lakes that serve a multitude of recreation purposes for the residents of Medford Lakes. Serving as the guardian to these natural beauties is the Medford Lakes Colony (MLC), a private homeowner association. Homeowners in this community contribute to a “Lake Restoration Fund,” managed by MLC, which is used to maintain the water control structures and monitor the water quality for the bodies of water within the community. This dedicated fund is often used for dredging of the lake beds; repairs and replacement of dams, spillways, and culverts; installation of aerators or fountains to promote long-term benefits to water quality; treatments for weeds and algae; and the maintenance of the coves and beaches.

In mid-April, a concerning blockage developed in Lake Wauwauskashe Dam’s spillway and water was backing up at the upstream outlet structure. The 30-inch wide corrugated metal pipe serves as the dam’s primary (and only) outlet under Wagush Trail, a neighborhood road connecting Lake Wauwauskashe and Lake Mushkodasa. During the attempt to clear the mass of accumulated woody-debris via vacuum truck extraction, a previous repair consisting of a 5’ segment of corrugated plastic pipe had been dislodged and expelled from the downstream end of the spillway. With a compromised dam and flooding in the forecast, MLC acted immediately to handle this emergency dam repair.

Primary Spillway Inlet
Before – Upper portion of the existing corrugated metal pipe was collapsed. After – Pipe was slip-lined and the annulary space was grouted.

 

Given Princeton Hydro’s long-term history of inspecting and maintaining dams and levees in Medford Lakes, MLC contracted our experts to assist. The next day, our team of geotechnical engineers were on-site to investigate the situation. To facilitate the inspection and minimize the stress/pressure on the dam, the upstream and downstream lakes were lowered via an NJDEP Fish and Wildlife Lake Lowering Permit. Additionally, a video inspection of the compromised culvert pipe was conducted. Our geotechnical team observed that the upstream portion of the pipe had collapsed and the structure was experiencing significant seepage (i.e. water flowing through undesirable paths through the dam with the potential for soil piping and stability failure).

Primary Spillway outlet
Before – The existing corrugated metal pipe had corroded and erosion had taken place around the outlet. After – Pipe has been slip-lined and outlet protection (riprap) was installed to stabilize the surrounding soil.

 

With the risk of potential dam failure, Princeton Hydro immediately kicked-off coordination with the NJDEP Bureau of Dam Safety, NJDEP Division of Land Use Regulation, the Pinelands Commission, and the Borough of Medford Lakes. Our licensed engineers promptly developed the repair concept and associated scope of work, detailing our proposed means and methods for the emergency repair.

“We take the potential risk of dam failure very seriously, as safety is one of our core values,” said Kevin Yezdimer, P.E. Director of Geosciences Engineering at Princeton Hydro. “Our geotechnical team prioritized the design, permitting, and implementation of this emergency repair to assure the safety of our client and the community.”

Injection grouting underway (Grout pressure is monitored during placement & the ground surface is monitored for signs of heave).

This included addressing the collapsed pipe; utilizing cementitious injection grouting and compaction grouting to eliminate seepage pathways and stabilize the earthen dam in-place; and provide spillway outfall protection. Through private solicitation, Princeton Hydro selected Compaction Grouting Services, Inc. as the specialty contractor to perform the repair.

A considerable volume of water was required to prepare the grout mixes, and no water sources were available adjacent to the project site. Seeking out solutions, MLC proposed the unique idea of using reclaimed wastewater from the local wastewater treatment plant. Our team confirmed that reuse of the reclaimed wastewater was indeed within the guidelines of the “Technical  Manual for Reclaimed Water for Beneficial Reuse,” and we successfully facilitated approval to use it with NJDEP Division of Water Quality.

Placement of cellular fill into the hollow concrete structure is underway. A lightweight foaming agent was added to the grout mix within the concrete truck. The lightweight grout was then pumped into the structure.

As the construction effort ramped-up, some complications arose. By design, this unique structure allows water flow over the dam’s weirs and drops 8 to 10 feet vertically before travelling under the roadway through the primary spillway. Above the primary spillway is a concrete structure that spans from the upstream lake to the downstream lake and immediately beneath the local roadway. It was discovered that this 50’ long, 6’ deep, concrete structure was hollow and served as a potential seepage pathway. Princeton Hydro proposed to fill-in the hollow structure with a lightweight cellular fill material in order to cut-off the potential seepage pathways, eliminate the 6’ deep hollow chamber beneath the roadway, and facilitate a long-term repair solution.

Implementation of this strategy was further complicated when a utility markout and a subsequent video inspection of the hollow structure confirmed that a gas line passed through the structure on the downstream side of the roadway. Princeton Hydro coordinated with South Jersey Gas to disconnect the gas line in order to minimize risk during construction and eliminate future complications. The neighborhoods on either side of the dam were fed redundantly, so their service was not interrupted during this process.

Overall, the emergency dam repair solution involved an in-situ soil stabilization of an earthen embankment dam via compaction/injection grouting, slip-lining the primary spillway, stabilization of the downstream outlet, and utilization of reclaimed wastewater as a water source for on-site grout batching. The following was completed by our team and contractors during the course of the emergency construction:

  • Slip-lining of the failed 30-inch pipe using a smooth, slightly smaller in diameter high density polyethylene pipe (HDPE) pipe inside of the existing pipe, providing an equal or greater hydraulic capacity as that existing;

  • Grouting of the annular space between the new and old pipes;

  • Non-woven geotextile fabric and riprap outfall protection were placed around the downstream outlet of the culvert pipe to provide scour protection;

  • Compaction and injection grouting was performed in multiple locations. The compaction grout utilized a “low-slump” mix while the injection grout utilized a much more mobile or fluid mix allowing for filling of existing seepage pathways or soil voids, and;

  • Approximately 44 cubic yards of lightweight cellular-grout backfill was utilized to fill in the hollow concrete structure beneath the roadway completing the emergency repair without the need for complete outlet structure or earthen dam reconstruction.

Lowering New Pipe Into Place

Creative, innovative solutions paired with timely coordination and expertise drove the success of the Lake Wauwauskashe Dam emergency repair.

Princeton Hydro has designed, permitted, and overseen the reconstruction, repair, and removal of a dozens of small and large dams in the Northeast. To learn more about our dam and barrier engineering services, visit: bit.ly/DamBarrier.

Kevin M. Yezdimer, P.E., Princeton Hydro’s Geoscience Engineering Director, is a multidisciplinary professional civil engineer who holds degrees in both Geology and Civil Engineering, and has 11 years of progressive and varied work experience as both a design consultant and project owner with Geotechnical & Construction Engineering being his core area of expertise. He has significant experience performing soil and rock core sampling programs, infiltration testing, soils laboratory testing, foundation design (shallow and deep), preparation of construction recommendations,  and overseeing construction review activities (e.g., earthwork, foundations, concrete, masonry, structural steel, roadway, and utility construction).

 

Jim Hunt, P.E., joined Princeton Hydro in 2017 as a Geotechnical Engineer and provides a wide range of engineering services for the firm including: subsurface explorations, bearing capacity and settlement analyses, slope stability analysis, stability analysis of existing structures, preparation of technical deliverables, and cost estimating.

 

 

 

Dam Removal on the Moosup River

Moosup River

The Moosup River is a beautiful 30-mile-long, trout river flowing through Connecticut and Rhode Island, eventually emptying into the Quinebaug River.

Several dams, most originally built in the 1800s or early 1900s, impeded the river’s natural flow, impaired habitat, fragmented the river system, and prevented fish from swimming upstream to their native spawning grounds.

In 2013, American Rivers, CTDEEP Fisheries, and Natural Resources Conservation Service began collaborating on the removal of multiple dams and remnant dams as part of a larger project to restore connectivity to the Moosup River in the Town of Plainfield. Princeton Hydro and RiverLogic Solutions were contracted to provide design-build and permitting services.

As part of this larger multi-year effort, five dams are planned for removal from the Moosup River. The most downstream barrier, the Hale Factory Dam was removed in 2014. The remnants of the toppled Griswold Rubber Dam were removed in 2015. In 2017, the removal of Brunswick Mill Dam #1 was completed. And, two more dams, downstream of New Brunswick Mill Dam #1, are currently under consideration for removal. When fully completed, the Moosup River Dam Removal Project will reconnect fish habitats along 6.9 miles of the Moosup River.

 

Hale Factory Dam

The Hale Factory Dam was constructed of a boulder core capped in a one-foot-thick concrete layer. The dam was partially breached as the concrete cap had deteriorated severely over the years, allowing flow to pass between boulders and allowing the normal pool elevation to drop substantially from its former design height.

The resource delineation conducted on site identified a vernal pool with an 18 inch culvert outlet that discharged 90 feet upstream of the dam. To preserve this ecological resource on the site, the vernal pool was not disturbed during the dam removal.

Princeton Hydro provided a field assessment, sediment characterization and analysis, final design and permit application package for the full removal of the Hale Factory Dam. Full removal of the dam entailed demolition and removal of the concrete, and re-use of the natural cobbles and boulders from the dam to create in-stream habitat features. Once completed, the river and its boulders appeared as if placed by nature itself, with the former dam’s presence indicated only by the age-old lichen covered field stone walls leading up to the banks.

 

Griswold Rubber Dam

The Griswold Rubber Dam was in a gravel-cobble reach of the river approximately 80 feet wide in the Village of Moosup and was adjacent to the 1992 expansion of the Griswold Rubber factory.  At one time, the dam stood approximately 10 feet high and 150 feet long. The dam was constructed of a large segmented concrete slab that had since toppled over and was lying nearly flat on the river bed in multiple sections. The dam structure, having failed, served no useful purpose. Despite being toppled, the dam still presented a deterrent to the effective movement of aquatic organisms at normal to low flows and was therefore worthy of complete removal to restore river connectivity.

Princeton Hydro conducted an initial field investigation with RiverLogic Solutions to gain insights regarding the construction approach. Princeton Hydro then followed-up with a more detailed assessment of river bed sediment, geomorphic conditions, the likely riverine response, construction access, and other design related issues that were incorporated into design plans and permit applications. The restoration design Princeton Hydro developed aimed to remove the partial barrier to fish passage with as little disturbance to surrounding infrastructure and resources as possible.

 

Brunswick Mill Dam #1

This dilapidated timber crib dam stood approximately 4-feet high and spanned the channel at approximately 130 feet. The timbers ranged from 1.5 to 2.5 feet in diameter and over 20 feet in length; 50 were integrated into the dam. The timber crib was filled with gravel and other debris, and the gravel substrate extended 50 feet upstream. The original dam was significantly higher, but the timber crib spillway deteriorated and gradually collapsed over time and only a portion of the structure remained.

For this project, Princeton Hydro completed sediment investigation, sampling and analysis; hydrologic and hydraulic analysis; and provided design and engineering for full removal of the dam. Princeton Hydro contracted with an archeologist / industrial historian, and together closely observed the dam deconstruction to observe and record how the timber crib had been assembled. Multiple types of iron pins and wooden pegs revealed how the dam had been repaired over the years – findings, old maps, and photos were incorporated into a historical report filed with the state historic preservation office. Princeton Hydro coordinated to have the old timbers salvaged for eventual re-use. Removing the Brunswick Mill Dam #1 was a continuation of the large scale Moosup River restoration effort and paved the way for the potential removal of two more dams downstream in the coming years.

“When a dam is breached and taken out, the tangible results are very quickly noticeable,” said Paul Woodworth, Princeton Hydro Fluvial Geomorphologist. “The return of migratory fish is a very strong indicator of the ecological benefits of dam removal – sometimes after a removal you can see fish immediately swimming upstream. Removing dams also improves safety in nearby communities, reestablishes the natural flow of sediment, improves water quality, provides new recreation opportunities, and restores habitats for fish and wildlife.”

Click here to read more about Princeton Hydro’s engineering services for the restoration and removal of dams.

The Westtown Dam and Lake Restoration Project is Now Complete!

westtown-0720161456Princeton Hydro is proud to announce the completion of the Westtown dam restoration and dredging project. For the past 10 years, Princeton Hydro has been working with the Westtown School on dam safety compliance and lake restoration and is the engineer-of-record for the restoration of the Westtown dam and lake.

Westtown School, a hallmark of the Westtown Lake community, initially contracted Princeton Hydro to complete dam inspections and assess the lake in terms of its environmental health and the need for dredging. The completion of this project is a testament to the School’s commitment to its mission of “inspiring and preparing its graduates to be stewards and leaders of a better world”. The School leads by example through practicing dam safety compliance and working to restore the lake for future generations.

westtown-img_2438For the dam, Princeton Hydro completed periodic visual inspections, dam breach and inundation analysis, the preparation of an Emergency Action Plan (EAP), and the Operations and Maintenance Manual.

For rehabilitation, Princeton Hydro designed the dam to be able to pass the 100-year flood event via a completely new drop spillway and outfall barrel, and the construction of an auxiliary/emergency cast-in-place stepped spillway. As part of the rehabilitation of the dam, Princeton Hydro surveyed and designed the dredging of 56,000 cubic yards of sediment, the rehabilitation of the lake’s sedimentation forebay and spillway, and the enlargement of a culvert on Westtown Road, immediately downstream of the dam. The culvert replacement was required due to the closure of two secondary outlets on the dam and corresponding culverts below Westtown Road.

westtown-0713161041aThis project also required a variety of permits, including a Chester County soil erosion and sediment control plan approval, a Dam Safety construction permit, a PADEP General Permit 11 for the road crossing, and a US Army Corps of Engineers Individual Permit in compliance with the Federal Clean Water Act.

Additionally, Princeton Hydro successfully navigated interests for two species of concern: the bog turtle (federal and state listed) habitat and red-bellied turtle (state listed) populations.

Following design and permitting, Princeton Hydro provided construction documentation and administration, including the review of shop drawings, monitoring soil compaction, inspecting concrete pours and collecting concrete test cylinders for break tests (ACI certified engineers), completing monthly progress reports, reviewing payment requests and change orders, and attend bi-weekly project meetings with the client. Flyway Excavating, the contractor for the project, worked seamlessly with the School and Princeton Hydro to accomplish the overall goals of the design.

The Westtown project is an excellent example of Princeton Hydro’s turnkey engineering, permitting, and construction administration services. Please contact us if you have a similar project you need assistance with or have questions about.

westtown-p1260748

*Photos courtesy of Flyway Excavating.