Improving Water Quality & Reducing Habitat Loss with Floating Wetland Islands

Floating Wetland Islands (FWI), also known as floating treatment wetlands, are an effective alternative to large, watershed-based, natural wetlands. Often described as self-sustaining, FWIs provide numerous ecological benefits. They assimilate and remove excess nutrients that could fuel algae growth; provide habitat for fish and other aquatic organisms; help mitigate wave and wind erosion impacts; provide an aesthetic element; and can be part of a holistic lake/pond management strategy. FWIs are also highly adaptable and can be sized, configured and planted to fit the needs of nearly any lakepond or reservoir.

Princeton Hydro Senior Scientist Katie Walston recently completed the Floating Island International (FII) Floating Wetland Master Seminar. The seminar provided participants with an in-depth look at the various technologies and products FII offers. Through hands-on examples, course participants learned how to utilize wetland islands for fisheries enhancement, stormwater management, shoreline preservation, wastewater treatment and more.

“The Master Seminar was truly valuable both personally and professionally,” said Katie. “I learned a tremendous amount and thoroughly enjoyed the experience. It’s very fulfilling knowing that I can take the knowledge I’ve learned back to Princeton Hydro and make positive impacts for our clients.”

FII was launched by inventor and outdoorsman Bruce Kania who was driven by the desire to reverse the decline of wetland habitats by developing a new and natural stewardship tool that could clean water and, in the process, improve life for all living creatures. He found that the answer lies in Biomimicry: duplicating nature’s processes in a sustainable, efficient and powerful way to achieve impeccable environmental stewardship for the benefit of all life.

Bruce brought together a team of engineers and plant specialists and created BioHaven® floating islands. These islands biomimic natural floating islands to create a “concentrated” wetland effect. Independent laboratory tests show removal rates far in excess of previously published data: 20 times more nitrate, 10 times more phosphate and 11 times more ammonia, using unplanted islands. They are also extremely effective at reducing total suspended solids and dissolved organic carbon in waterways.

Due to population growth, industrialization and climate change, wetlands are at risk of rapidly declining in quantity and quality due. However, every floating wetland island launched by FII provides an effective strategy for mitigating and adapting to the impacts of over development and climate change.

The unique design of BioHaven® floating islands means that 250 square feet of island translates to an acre’s worth of wetland surface area. These versatile floating islands can be launched in either shallow or deep water, and can be securely anchored or tethered to ensure that they remain in a specific location. They are almost infinitely customizable, and can be configured in a variety of ways.

In addition to ongoing prototype development, FII offers licensing opportunities to businesses and production facilities worldwide. FII continues to research and develop collaborative pilot projects to quantify BioHaven® floating islands’ efficacy.

Many thanks to Bruce and Anne Kania for hosting the Floating Wetland Master Seminar and inspiring action through their knowledge, passion and ongoing endeavors.

 

Musconetcong Watershed Association Presents Princeton Hydro President with Prestigious “Friend of the River” Award

 

Musconetcong Watershed Association (MWA) held a dinner to celebrate its 25th anniversary as well as the 150th anniversary of the Asbury Grist Mill, which the MWA is working to restore. The evening included a cocktail hour, a buffet dinner, silent auction, remarks by the MWA President Tish Lascelle and Executive Director Alan Hunt, and a presentation of awards.

The MWA presented Princeton Hydro PresiPhoto by Tish Lascelle, President, Musconetcong Watershed Associationdent Geoff Goll, PE with the “Friend of the River” Award. This award, which has only been given seven times in MWA’s 25 years of service, recognizes individuals who have made a significant and sustainable difference in the Watershed and helped to advance its mission. Recipients of the Award have also demonstrated outstanding leadership through their volunteer efforts or partnerships with MWA.

Geoff was honored to receive the award alongside Paul Kenney of the National Park Service and Richard C. Cotton, a Managing Partner of the Hawk Pointe Golf Club and Asbury Farms Real Estate. Paul was assigned the Musconetcong River in late 2003 and was instrumental in obtaining the Musconetcong River’s Wild and Scenic Designation in 2006. He has continued to be an excellent resource of the National Park Service.  Richard is a founding member of the MWA’s Board of Trustee’s and continues to serve on the Board. He has dedicated his professional life to striking a balance between economic growth with environmental protection.

Geoff has been working with MWA in the areas of river restoration, dam removal, and engineering consulting since 2003, when the efforts to remove the Gruendyke Mill Dam in Hackettstown, NJ began. He has since worked with the Princeton Hydro team to remove five dams on the Musconetcong River, the most recent being the Hughesville Dam

MWA is an independent, non-profit organization dedicated to protecting and improving the quality of the Musconetcong River and its Watershed, including its natural and cultural resources. Members of the organization are part of a network of individuals, families and companies that care about the Musconetcong River and its watershed, and are dedicated to improving the watershed resources through public education and awareness programs, river water quality monitoring, promotion of sustainable land management practices and community involvement.

During the anniversary dinner, participants also got a sneak peek of a new video from the National Park Service that is set for public release in 2018. The video celebrates the upcoming 50th anniversary of the Federal Wild and Scenic Rivers Act, under which the Musconetcong River is protected, and explores the importance of free-flowing rivers and why Americans treasure them. Representing Princeton Hydro at the awards dinner were Vice President Mark Gallagher, his wife Jennifer, Geoff and his wife Amy, and Director of Engineering Services Mary Paist-Goldman, PE.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Princeton Hydro Founder Invited to Speak at EPA’s Harmful Algal Blooms Workshop

Princeton Hydro Founder Dr. Steve Souza was an invited speaker at the USEPA Region 2 Freshwater Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) and Public Drinking Water Systems workshop last week in Manhattan. The objective of the workshop was to share information about the monitoring and assessment of freshwater HABs and the efforts to minimize their effect on public drinking water and the recreational uses of lakes.

Steve’s presentation focused on the proactive management of HABs, providing useful tips for and real-world examples of how to address HABs before they manifest, and, if a HAB does manifest, how to prevent it from further exacerbating water quality and cyanotoxin problems.

The workshop was well attended with 80 people on site and 40 others participating via webinar link. Steve was joined by nine other invited speakers, most of whom were representing the USEPA, NYSDEC and NJDEP, who gave presentations on a variety of HABs related topics, including the optimization of water treatment operations to minimize cyanotoxin risks surveillance and assessment of HABs, and communicating HABs risks in recreational lakes and drinking water reservoirs.

If you’re interested in learning more about HABs, you can view a complete copy of Steve’s presentation, titled Proactive Management of Harmful Algae Blooms in Drinking Water and Recreational Waterbodies, by clicking the image below. Please contact us anytime to discuss how Princeton Hydro’s Invasive Weed and Algae Management Services can be of service to you.

The USEPA Region 2 serves New Jersey, New York, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and eight tribal nations. Get more info on key issues and initiatives in USEPA Region 2.

 

 

Princeton Hydro Dam Removal Work Featured at Brazilian Workshop

As Brazil is in the midst of a dam-building boom, scientists and engineers gathered at a workshop in Brazil to discuss, “Dam Removal & Optimizing Hydro Locations to Benefit Species Diversity in Brazil.”

Laura Wildman, P.E., Water Resources and Fisheries Engineer and Director of Princeton Hydro’s New England Regional Office, was invited to speak at the workshop. Her presentation focused on why we remove dams in the U.S. (the key drivers), how we analyze them for removal, and what we are learning through a wide diversity of completed case studies.

“It was fascinating to discuss a topic, such as the removal of dams, right as Brazil is focusing on building more hydro capacity,” said Laura. “Hopefully it is a sign that the hydro industry in Brazil, along with all the great Brazilian fisheries researchers, are quite forward thinking and are determined to maintain their country’s rich species diversity while also enhancing their energy options.”

The workshop, hosted by CEMIG and held at UFMG, involved many universities, including our workshop host Paulo Pompeu from UFLA, Dr. Paul Kemp from University of Southhampton, Dr. Jesse O’Hanley of Kent Business School, and many others.

The gathering inspired a lot of interesting dialogue around dam removal, optimizing locations for new hydro facilities, and how to best sustain connectivity and species diversity. Laura’s presentation entitled “Dam removal in the United States” along with the other conference presentations will be available on the CEMIG website soon or check back here on the Princeton Hydro blog for presentation links.

Aquatic Organism Passage: A Princeton Hydro Blog Series

Introducing part one of a multi-part blog series about aquatic organism passage
What you’ll learn:
  • What is aquatic organism passage?
  • Why is it important?
  • How does Princeton Hydro support it?

This photo from NYS DEC demonstrates a well-designed stream crossing.

Since the US government began allotting funds for building roads in U.S. national forests in the late 1920s, hundreds of thousands of culverts were built across the country. Culverts, or drainage structures that convey water underneath a barrier such as a road or railroad, were originally built with the intention of moving water quickly and efficiently. While this goal was met, many migratory fish and other aquatic organisms could not overcome the culverts’ high-velocity flows, sending them away from their migratory destinations. If the culvert was perched, or elevated above the water surface, it would require the migratory aquatic animals to both leap upwards and fight the unnaturally fast stream current to continue their journeys. Additionally, turbulence, low flows, and debris challenged the movement of aquatic organisms.

Thus, the goal of aquatic organism passage (AOP) is to maintain connectivity by allowing aquatic organisms to migrate upstream or downstream under roads. AOP “has a profound influence on the movement, distribution and abundance of populations of aquatic species in rivers and streams”. These aforementioned species include “fish, aquatic reptiles and amphibians, and the insects that live in the stream bed and are the food source for fish”.

This photo from NYS DEC demonstrates a poorly-designed stream crossing.

A poorly designed culvert can harm fish populations in multiple ways. If sturgeon aren’t able to surpass it, habitat fragmentation prevails. And so, a once-connected habitat for thousands of sturgeon breaks into isolated areas where a few hundred now live. When the population was in the thousands, a disease that wiped out 80% of the population would still leave a viable number of individuals left to survive and mate; a population of a few hundred will be severely hurt by such an event. In sum, habitat fragmentation raises the risk of local extinction (extirpation) as well as extinction in general.

The splintering of a large population into several smaller ones can also leave species more vulnerable to invasive species. Generally, the greater the biodiversity harbored in a population, the stronger its response will be against a disturbance. A dwindling community of a few hundred herring will likely succumb to an invasive who preys on it while a larger, more robust community of a few thousand herring has a greater chance of containing some individuals who can outcompete the invasive.

Aquatic Organism Passage in Action at Princeton Hydro

Princeton Hydro recently teamed up with Trout Unlimited to reconnect streams within a prized central-Pennsylvanian trout fishery.  Our team enabled aquatic organism passage by replacing two culverts in Pennsylvania’s Cross Fork Creek. Read about it here!

Sources:

“Aquatic Organism Passage through Bridges and Culverts.” Flow. Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation’s Watershed Management Division, 31 Jan. 2014. Web. 14 Mar. 2017.

Hoffman, R.L., Dunham, J.B., and Hansen, B.P., eds., 2012, Aquatic organism passage at road-stream crossings— Synthesis and guidelines for effectiveness monitoring: US Geological Survey Open-File Report 2012-1090, 64p.

Jackson, S., 2003. “Design and Construction of Aquatic Organism Passage at Road-Stream Crossings: Ecological Considerations in the Design of River and Stream Crossings.” 20-29 International Conference of Ecology and Transportation, Lake Placid, New York.

Kilgore, Roger T., Bergendahl, Bart S., and Hotchkiss, Rollin H. Publication No. FHWAHIF-11-008 HEC-26. Culvert Design for Aquatic Organism Passage Hydraulic Engineering Circular Number 26. October 2010.

Princeton Hydro Founder Receives Lake Management Achievement Award

We’re thrilled to announce that Princeton Hydro Founder Dr. Stephen J Souza received the North American Lake Management Society’s “2017 Lake Management Success Stories Award” for his work with Lake Mohawk.

While accepting his award Dr. Souza stated, “this would not have been possible had it not been for the foresight of the Lake Mohawk Country Club and the support we have received over the years from the Lake Board, the current General Manager Barbara Wortman, Steve Waehler and the Lake Committee, Ernie Hofer and Gene DePerz of the Lake Mohawk Preservation Foundation, and of course the late Fran Smith.”

Steve went on to thank his staff at Princeton Hydro, especially Chris Mikolajczyk and Dr. Fred Lubnow, for their efforts over the years “collecting and analyzing a variety of lake data and implementing the innovative restoration practices responsible for the lake’s water quality improvements.”

Since 1990, Dr. Souza has worked with the Lake Mohawk Country Club and the Lake Mohawk Preservation Foundation to develop and implement successful lake management strategies to restore and protect the health of the lake and its surrounding watershed.

The NALMS award recognizes an individual or team with notable accomplishment of lake and reservoir management efforts that demonstrate improvements in lake/reservoir condition or watershed management in a cost-effective manner.

Many thanks to Lake Mohawk for the continued partnership and steadfast commitment to water quality. And, thanks to NALMS for bestowing Dr. Souza with this great honor.

Click here to see the complete 2017 awards recap from NALMS.

American Littoral Society and Princeton Hydro Receive “Project of the Year” Award

The American Littoral Society and Princeton Hydro accepted the “Project of the Year” Award at last night's The American Society of Civil Engineers Central New Jersey Branch Annual Dinner. The team received the award for their work on the Barnegat Bay Green Infrastructure Project. Photo from left to right: Tim Dillingham, American Littoral Society Executive Director; Helen Henderson American Littoral Society Ocean Planning Manager for the Mid-Atlantic region; Dr. Stephen J. Souza, Princeton Hydro Founder.

The American Littoral Society and Princeton Hydro accepted the “Project of the Year” Award at the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Annual Dinner. The team received the award for their work on the Barnegat Bay Green Infrastructure Project.

”This was a terrific project conducted for a terrific client – the American Littoral Society,” said Princeton Hydro Founder Dr. Stephen Souza. “It also would not have been possible without a very supportive and engaged stakeholder group.”

The Barnegat Bay Project focused on reducing the amount of pollution entering the Bay’s waterways by retrofitting outdated stormwater management systems and implementing green infrastructure on previously developed sites.

“The project showcases the combined skill-sets of Princeton Hydro,” said Dr. Souza. “This was a truly collaborative effort involving the company’s aquatic ecologists, wetland ecologists, water resource engineers and landscape architect. We all worked closely to develop and implement green infrastructure solutions that measurably decrease pollutant loading to Barnegat Bay and correct localized flooding problems.”

Learn more about the award-winning project here: https://goo.gl/uQ3DfV. Big congratulations to the entire Littoral Society team for winning this prestigious award! And, many thanks to ASCE Central Jersey Branch for the recognition.

Barnegat Bay Green Infrastructure Project Named “Project of the Year”

Princeton Hydro is thrilled to announce that American Littoral Society’s Barnegat Bay Green Infrastructure Project has been named “Project of the Year” by The American Society of Civil Engineers Central Jersey Branch.

The award-winning project was a collaboration between the Littoral Society, Princeton Hydro and key partners that involved implementing a variety of green infrastructure stormwater management projects in order to decrease the volume of runoff and associated pollutants flowing into and damaging Barnegat Bay.

The green infrastructure projects were designed to treat stormwater at its source while delivering environmental, social and economic benefits to the Bay. Completed projects include:

  • Conversion of standard, grassed detention basins into naturalized bio-retention basins, as exemplified by the Laurel Commons Carnation Circle Basin, which now serves as a paradigm for the cost-effective retrofitting of aged, traditional detention basins
  • At Toms River High School North, the installation of tree boxes,
  • At the Toms River Board of Education offices, the replacement of conventional paving with permeable pavement,
  • At multiple sites, the construction of rain gardens,
  • At Toms River High School North, the construction/installation of stormwater management Manufactured Treatment Devices (MTDs)
  • At the Toms River Community Medical Center (RWJ Barnabas Health), the construction of a bio-retention/infiltration basin

The entire Princeton Hydro team extends our warmest congratulations to Helen Henderson and all of the folks at American Littoral Society for winning this prestigious award! Princeton Hydro is proud to partner with this incredible organization and is grateful for the work they do to protect our beautiful coastline and save the bay!

The Awards Dinner and celebration takes place on Tuesday, October 17th at the Forsgate Country Club. The “Project of the Year” nomination was originally submitted by Princeton Hydro founder Dr. Stephen Souza on behalf of the Littoral Society.

For a more detailed summary and photos of the award-winning project, click here.

Environmental Education Opportunity

Upcoming Course Announcement:
Green Infrastructure Stormwater Management 1-Day Class

Members of the Princeton Hydro team are teaching a 1-day class on Green Infrastructure Stormwater Management Techniques at Montclair State University.

This innovative class, offered through the University’s Continuing Professional Education Services program, focuses on the proper selection, design, implementation and maintenance of green infrastructure techniques commonly used in urban and suburban settings. Multiple site examples will be provided helping participants walk away with a deeper understanding of how to apply what they learn in real-world scenarios.

The course will be held on Friday, October 6, 2017 from 8:00 AM to 4:00 PM. Advance registration is required. To sign up for and get more course details, click here.

Continuing Professional Education Services, LLC is the brainchild of Dr. Jorge H. Berkowitz and Philip I. Brilliant. From the inception of the Continuing Environmental Education for Professional (CEEP) program at the College of Science and Mathematics (CSAM) at Montclair State University, Dr. Berkowitz and Mr. Brilliant have been in the classroom and in the boardroom assuring the success of the program. In order to better serve the community of professionals, Dr. Berkowitz and Mr. Brilliant stepped forward with a solution that has saved the ability to offer continuing education credit-bearing courses at the second largest public higher education institution in New Jersey. Together they form CPES at Montclair State University!

Celebrate “Lakes Appreciation Month” All Year

It’s officially the last day of #LakesAppreciation Month, but that certainly doesn’t mean our love for lakes is limited to one month out of the year. Here are a few ideas from North American Lake Management Society (NALMS) for how to appreciate your community lakes all year long:

  1. Appreciate them by enjoying them; plan outings with your family and friends
  2. Arrange a lake or watershed clean-up event; check out these tips for how to get started
  3. Help monitor your local waterbody; New Jersey residents can go here to learn about Community Water Monitoring volunteer opportunities
  4. Inspire others to #getoutside and enjoy; as you’re out and about appreciating your local lakes, remember to take photos and share on social media using these hashtags: #LakesAppreciation and #NALMS

Always remember to enjoy your local lakes responsibly. Here are a few tips to help you have fun in nature while having minimal environmental impact.

(Pictured above: Budd Lake in Mount Olive Township, Morris County, New Jersey)