Recycled Christmas Trees Used to Restore Disappearing NJ Shoreline

INNOVATIVE COASTAL RESILIENCY DESIGN USING RECYCLED CHRISTMAS TREES IMPLEMENTED BY VOLUNTEERS ALONG DISAPPEARING POINT PLEASANT SHORELINE

To prevent further erosion at the Slade Dale Sanctuary in Point Pleasant, dozens of volunteers helped stabilize the shoreline using a technique that has never been done before in New Jersey.  On Saturday, American Littoral Society, in partnership with Princeton Hydro, Borough of Point Pleasant, New Jersey Nature Conservancy, New Jersey Corporate Wetlands Restoration Partnership, and the Point Pleasant Rotary Club, organized dozens of volunteers to restore the shoreline and prevent further erosion at the Slade Dale Sanctuary using recycled Christmas trees.

As one of only a few areas of open space left in Point Pleasant, the 13-acre Slade Dale Sanctuary is an important part of the local ecosystem, and is home to a number of unique animals and plants. This waterfront preserve along the North Branch Beaver Dam Creek is predominantly tidal marsh, which provides habitat for various birds, including osprey, as well as passive recreation opportunities for the community.

Unfortunately, the Slade Dale Sanctuary is disappearing. Since 1930, the shoreline of Slade Dale Sanctuary has retreated approximately 300 feet, equal to the length of a football field, and the channels into the marsh have increased in number and size, according to a study we conducted on behalf of American Littoral Society, for which we provide engineering and natural resources management consulting services.

In order to stabilize the shoreline, restore the marsh, and enhance the ecological function and integrity of the preserve, Princeton Hydro developed a conceptual and engineering design using living shoreline features to enhance ecological value and reduce erosion. The final conceptual plan for restoration uses tree vane structures to attenuate wave action, foster sediment accretion, and reduce erosion along the coast.

To implement this vision and begin building back marsh, the project team is constructing several Christmas tree breakwaters and Christmas tree vanes that mimic naturally occurring debris structures in tidal systems and enhance habitat opportunity and shelter for aquatic life. Volunteers came together on Saturday, May 11 to help with the construction. The Mayor of Point Pleasant Robert A. Sabosik also attended the event, “The Barnegat Bay is an attribute that we all enjoy, and it’s something we have to protect.”

After the 2018 holiday season, the Good Sheppard Lutheran Church in Point Pleasant provided space to collect and store donated Christmas trees, which were then moved to the marsh a few days before the event. On the day of the event, recycled Christmas trees were transported from their staged locations on the marsh to the breakwater sections that were previously installed in the water. To transport them across the water to the pilings, volunteers used two methods: by walking a skiff boat loaded with trees through the water to the pilings or by forming assembly line from the shore to pilings to guide floating trees through the water (check out the album below!).  Then, they stuffed the Christmas trees between the pilings, securely tied them down, and staked Christmas trees directly into the creek bottom. For extra assurance, the placed and tied heavy bags of used oyster shells on top of the tree line. Oyster shells were donated by local Monmouth County restaurants in an effort to reduce waste streams.

“We really enjoyed participating in this event with American Littoral Society and so many wonderful volunteers,” Christiana L. Pollack, GISP, CFM, Princeton Hydro’s Project Manager for this restoration effort. “It is so wonderful to see this project coming to fruition. We’re so proud of our partnership with American Littoral Society and our combined efforts to revitalize and rehabilitate our precious coastal habitats.”

Members of the media were invited to attend the volunteer event. News 12 New Jersey covered the event and aired a story on it during their Sunday news broadcast, and NJTV News will be airing the story in the near future.

Many thanks to everyone who came out in support of this important restoration effort at Slade Dale Sanctuary American Littoral Society hosts volunteer events throughout the year. Go here to get involved.

 

Deal Lake Improves Water Quality on a Sustainable Basis

Success Spotlight: Deal Lake Watershed Protection Plan Implementation Project

Deal Lake Commission, Interlaken, New Jersey

Deal Lake is the largest of New Jersey’s coastal lakes, encompassing 155 acres and spanning over 27 miles of shoreline. The lake’s 4,400-acre watershed is highly developed, with the majority of development dating back to the 1940s-1960s. As a result, stormwater management, particularly with respect to water quality and volume management, is largely lacking.

Since 1980, the Deal Lake Commission (DLC) has served as the State-appointed steward of the lake.  Princeton Hydro secured the DLC $450,000 in 319(h) funding to implement the lake’s New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection-approved Watershed Protection Plan. The 319(h) funding was used by the DLC to conduct three projects designed to decrease stormwater-based pollutant loading, improve the lake’s water quality, and restore heavily eroded sections of the shoreline.

Asbury Park Comstock Street MTD

Screen Shot 2016-05-23 at 9.20.04 AMThis project involved the installation of a manufactured treatment device (MTD). MTDs are very effective “retrofit” solutions that can be used to address stormwater issues even in highly developed areas. The MTD installation was complicated by site constraints including sub-surface infrastructure. Post-installation field testing and STEPL modeling conducted by Princeton Hydro confirmed that the MTD significantly decreased the pollutant loading from one of the lake’s major stormwater outfalls.

 

Colonial Terrace Golf Course Bioretention BMPs
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Princeton Hydro conducted the field testing, engineering design, and permitting of three bio-infiltration basins constructed at the Colonial Terrace Golf Course (CTGC). Post-project-completion field testing showed each basin is capable of fully infiltrating the runoff generated by storms as great as 1.5 inches per hour. In addition, over 300 feet of eroded shoreline was stabilized with native plants. Doing so helped create a dense buffer that inhibits passage of Canada geese from the lake onto the golf course.

 

Asbury Park Boat Launch Shoreline Stabilization

Princeton Hydro developed a bio-engineering design for the stabilization of a badly eroded 250-foot segment section of shoreline adjacent to the Asbury Park boat launch. Coir fiber logs were used in conjunction with native plant material. As with the CTGC planting, help was provided by local volunteers and the DLC commissioners. The final element of the project involved the construction of a bioretention rain garden to control the runoff from the boat launch parking area. Signage was also installed to inform the public about the project and the benefits of shoreline naturalization.

 

The Deal Lake Watershed Protection Plan Implementation Project proved that despite Deal Lake being located in a highly urbanized watershed, it is possible to implement cost-effective green infrastructure and stormwater retrofit solutions capable of significantly decreasing pollutant loading to the lake.  These measures are part of the DLC’s continued efforts to utilize environmentally sustainable techniques to improve the lake’s water quality. This project won a North American Lake Management Society Technical Merit Award.

For more information about this and other Princeton Hydro projects, please contact us!