Stormwater Projects in Action

Improving Barnegat Bay through Green Infrastructure and Stormwater Management


American Littoral Society, Ocean County Soil Conservation District and Princeton Hydro recently held a Stormwater Projects in Action workshop. The workshop focused on a number of 319(h) funded projects designed by Princeton Hydro and implemented by American Littoral Society in the Long Swamp Creek/Lower Toms River sub-watersheds of Barnegat Bay. Those projects exemplified how green infrastructure techniques could be used to retrofit, upgrade and compliment standard stormwater management methods. This included the restoration of healthy soils and the construction/installation of bioretention basins, rain gardens, porous pavement, and sub-surface Manufactured Treatment Devices (MTDs).

Event participants learned about the problems affecting Barnegat Bay due to over-development and improper stormwater management. They were presented with examples of the types of green infrastructure solutions that can be implemented in any setting in order to achieve cleaner water and less flooding.

A brochure detailing each of the projects and providing an in-depth look at the incredible work being done to save Barnegat Bay was distributed to event attendees. You can download your free copy here:


Princeton Hydro President Dr. Stephen Souza gave two presentations at the event. The first presentation explored the Matrix Scoring Tool that Princeton Hydro’s Senior Environmental Scientist Paul Cooper along with Dr. Souza developed to quantitatively evaluate the relative benefit of conducting one stormwater project versus another in a particular area. The 2nd presentation provided an overview of the five stormwater improvement projects that Princeton Hydro conducted as part of the $1,000,000 319(h) grant secured for American Littoral Society. If you’re interested in receiving a copy of either presentation, submit a comment below or email us.

Clean water is fundamental to all life.



Deal Lake Improves Water Quality on a Sustainable Basis

Success Spotlight: Deal Lake Watershed Protection Plan Implementation Project

Deal Lake Commission, Interlaken, New Jersey

Deal Lake is the largest of New Jersey’s coastal lakes, encompassing 155 acres and spanning over 27 miles of shoreline. The lake’s 4,400-acre watershed is highly developed, with the majority of development dating back to the 1940s-1960s. As a result, stormwater management, particularly with respect to water quality and volume management, is largely lacking.

Since 1980, the Deal Lake Commission (DLC) has served as the State-appointed steward of the lake.  Princeton Hydro secured the DLC $450,000 in 319(h) funding to implement the lake’s New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection-approved Watershed Protection Plan. The 319(h) funding was used by the DLC to conduct three projects designed to decrease stormwater-based pollutant loading, improve the lake’s water quality, and restore heavily eroded sections of the shoreline.

Asbury Park Comstock Street MTD

Screen Shot 2016-05-23 at 9.20.04 AMThis project involved the installation of a manufactured treatment device (MTD). MTDs are very effective “retrofit” solutions that can be used to address stormwater issues even in highly developed areas. The MTD installation was complicated by site constraints including sub-surface infrastructure. Post-installation field testing and STEPL modeling conducted by Princeton Hydro confirmed that the MTD significantly decreased the pollutant loading from one of the lake’s major stormwater outfalls.


Colonial Terrace Golf Course Bioretention BMPs
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Princeton Hydro conducted the field testing, engineering design, and permitting of three bio-infiltration basins constructed at the Colonial Terrace Golf Course (CTGC). Post-project-completion field testing showed each basin is capable of fully infiltrating the runoff generated by storms as great as 1.5 inches per hour. In addition, over 300 feet of eroded shoreline was stabilized with native plants. Doing so helped create a dense buffer that inhibits passage of Canada geese from the lake onto the golf course.


Asbury Park Boat Launch Shoreline Stabilization

Princeton Hydro developed a bio-engineering design for the stabilization of a badly eroded 250-foot segment section of shoreline adjacent to the Asbury Park boat launch. Coir fiber logs were used in conjunction with native plant material. As with the CTGC planting, help was provided by local volunteers and the DLC commissioners. The final element of the project involved the construction of a bioretention rain garden to control the runoff from the boat launch parking area. Signage was also installed to inform the public about the project and the benefits of shoreline naturalization.


The Deal Lake Watershed Protection Plan Implementation Project proved that despite Deal Lake being located in a highly urbanized watershed, it is possible to implement cost-effective green infrastructure and stormwater retrofit solutions capable of significantly decreasing pollutant loading to the lake.  These measures are part of the DLC’s continued efforts to utilize environmentally sustainable techniques to improve the lake’s water quality. This project won a North American Lake Management Society Technical Merit Award.

For more information about this and other Princeton Hydro projects, please contact us!

Stormwater Management for Lake Communities

A Presentation by Princeton Hydro President Dr. Steve Souza

Available for Free Download

Princeton Hydro President, Dr. Steve Souza, spent Saturday morning with over 50 members of the New Jersey Coalition of Lakes, an organization that promotes the management of healthy lake ecosystems. Together they discussed many different stormwater management options for lake communities.

Dr. Souza’s presentation covered the principles of stormwater management and the importance of incorporating stormwater management into lake restoration plans. He also provided examples of simple, homeowner-scale runoff control techniques, as well as a sampling of Princeton Hydro designed and constructed large-scale, community-based stormwater management systems. Download a copy of the full presentation here or below!

The meeting hosts, Lake Mohawk Country Club and Lake Mohawk Preservation Foundation, have implemented a number of local stormwater enhancement projects. To check out some examples, go here.

To learn more about Princeton Hydro’s stormwater management and lake restoration services, visit our website or contact us!

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Really, it’s the least we could do.

Originally posted August 27, 2010 at

There has been a growing number of people realizing that sustainable stormwater design can fill another very important function: habitat creation. In many regions where open space it at a premium and the creation of green space in urban areas has become paramount, using stormwater management facilities – large and small – to provide precious habitat opportunities is making more and more sense. In fact, some would argue (us included) that it’s a no-brainer.

Beyond planting with natives, maintaining naturalized stormwater facilities reduces reliance on fossil fuels, improves air quality, maximizes pollution reduction, and can provide increased infiltration. Sadly, the push back to naturalization can be fierce. Concerns that anything but closely cropped lawn will harbor threats to human health and well-being are far-ranging – we’ve heard it all: rats, snakes, pollen (gasp!), and perverts. Yes; perverts.

Sadly, the sterilization of our environment has led to the widespread collapse of ecosystems and left us engaged in an endless war with invasive species. Humanity’s lack of understanding that we rely on a healthy environment for our own health and well-being is quickly sending us down a slippery slope; once we lower our species diversity and richness, it won’t recover in this millennium.

The least we could do is offer up our stormwater spaces to buck the trend.

Lauren Kovacs, LEED AP
Environmental Designer