2018 Watershed Congress Synopsis

The Delaware Riverkeeper Network hosted its annual Watershed Congress event, which is focused on bringing environmental enthusiasts together in an effort to advance the best available information and techniques for protecting and restoring watersheds. The one-day conference combines science, policy, and practical applications into one program that consists of an engaging keynote discussion, exhibits, poster sessions and 21 concurrent presentations covering a broad range of watershed topics.

Princeton Hydro gave two presentations during the event:

Ecology/Management of Cyanotoxin Producing Blue-Green Algae in the Schuylkill River 

Dr. Fred Lubnow, Director of Aquatic Programs, presented on the basic ecology of nuisance blue-green algae and how to monitor, manage and prevent cyanotoxins particularly in potable water supplies.

As identified in the Schuylkill River Watershed Source Water Protection Plan, approximately 1.5 million people depend on the Schuylkill River watershed as a source of potable water. Elevated nutrient (nitrogen and phosphorus) loading can stimulate the growth of nuisance algal blooms in the river, and higher phosphorus concentrations can cause blue-green algae blooms (also known as cyanobacteria). Cyanobacteria produce cyanotoxins, which can cause serious health implications for humans, pets and livestock. Drinking water contaminated by very high cyanotoxin concentrations can actually be lethal.

Fred’s presentation covered the ecology and management of blue-green algae in a riverine ecosystem in order to prevent the potential impacts of cyanotoxins on potable supplies of water. He provided management actions within the context of USEPA’s recommended drinking water health advisories for select cyanotoxins. Participants also received general recommendations on what they can do to minimize their contribution to potential cyanotoxin-producing blue-green algal blooms in the Schuylkill River.

Click here to download a complete copy of Fred’s presentation!

If it’s a BMP, Will it Protect Water Quality?

Michele Adams of Meliora Design and Princeton Hydro’s Senior Project Manager, Dr. Clay Emerson, PE, CFM, taught an interactive presentation and group discussion on stormwater Best Management Practices (BMPs) and issues.

The presentation covered a variety of stormwater management topics and techniques, including the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection’s Interim Final BMP 6.4.11 Draft Slow Release Concept, which allows for slow release when infiltration is not feasible. They also discussed evolving standards for bioretention/rain garden soils, the lack of requirements for construction oversight, inspection of stormwater BMPs, and the challenges of long-term stormwater BMP maintenance and performance.

Stormwater management has evolved from its peak-flow based infancy into a more comprehensive approach that addresses volume and water quality in addition to peak flow rate. The number of built examples of different types of stormwater management and green infrastructure has greatly increased in Pennsylvania. However, experience suggests that under the current state of practice, many stormwater management designs are not able to meet the goal of water quality protection.

The main goal of the session was to provide participants with the information they need to understand and ask the right questions in order to protect their watersheds as development occurs.

About the Watershed Congress

The Watershed Congress advances the best available information and techniques for protecting and restoring watersheds. The focus on networking across disciplines means that the Congress melds science, policy and practical applications into one program. Every year, a growing and changing group of individuals attends to gain new knowledge, acquire tools, and practice techniques that will allow them to take active roles in the stewardship of their natural resources. View selected presentations from previous Watershed Congresses.