Employee Spotlight: Meet Our New Team Members

We’re excited to welcome four new members to our team. The addition of this group of talented individuals strengthens our commitment to delivering great service that exceeds our clients’ expectations.

Meet Our New Team Members
Miranda Lepek, EIT, Water Resource Engineer

Miranda is a civil engineer with expertise in grading and stormwater design, CAD drafting, environmental sampling, and construction oversight. Prior to Princeton Hydro, she worked for a small site development firm in Michigan where she developed her drafting skills and facilitated multiple aspects of private and commercial land development projects.

Miranda holds a B.S. in Civil Engineering from the University of Michigan – Ann Arbor. While on study abroad, she contributed to the one of the longest-running native amphibian field studies in New Zealand. In other previous experiences, she worked on major projects including the investigation phases of a Superfund site cleanup in Duluth, MN and a comprehensive sampling operation over 40 miles of the Hudson River near Albany, NY. In her free time, Miranda enjoys hiking, foraging, cooking and art.

Sumantha Prasad, PE, ENV SP, Water Resource Engineer

Sumantha is a Water Resource Engineer with a B.S. in Bioenvironmental Engineering from Rutgers University and a M.S. in Environmental Engineering and Science from Johns Hopkins University. She worked in Maryland for seven years focusing on ecological restoration projects, including stream restoration, wetland creation and enhancement, and stormwater management, and she worked for 3 years with a primary focus on highway hydrology and hydraulics.

In her spare time, she enjoys being a Toastmaster and serves as the Treasurer to a 501(c)3 organization dedicated to creating inclusive housing communities for adults with disabilities. She also enjoys telling terrible puns unapologetically.

Pat Rose, Environmental Scientist

Pat’s interest in aquatics began during a summer course studying at Lake Atitlán, Guatemala as an undergraduate at SUNY Oneonta. After graduation, he spent a year volunteering with AmeriCorps in Knoxville, Tennessee as part of a Water Quality Team. While in Tennessee, Pat spent the majority of his time educating high school students on how to protect and improve local waterways and watersheds as part of the Adopt-A-Watershed program. During his year with AmeriCorps, Pat worked with government organizations to perform biological sampling and erosion monitoring in local streams.

Pat graduated from SUNY Oneonta with a M.S. in Lake Management in December 2018. During his time in graduate school, he created an interim lake management plan for a small reservoir in New York that has had cyanobacterial blooms over the past few years. Pat spent this past summer completing a co-op with an aquatic plant management company in the Pacific Northwest, working primarily with invasive Eurasian and hybrid watermilfoil populations.

Duncan Simpson, Senior Environmental Scientist

For nearly a decade, Duncan has served as an Environmental Scientist/Planner in the Mid-Atlantic Region. His experience includes a wide range of natural resource studies, documentation, and permitting at both the project and program level. He has special expertise in wetlands; Waters of the US delineations; and permitting for stormwater management facilities, stream restoration, and TMDL program projects. He has conducted forest stand delineations; rare, threatened and endangered species consultations; mitigation monitoring; and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation.

Duncan holds an M.S in Biology from Towson University and a B.S. in Environmental Science with a Wildlife and Fisheries Conservation Minor from the University of Massachusetts. During his graduate studies, he researched amphibian species found in Delmarva Bays and testing models that predict their presence based on abiotic habitat characteristics. He also served as a student member of the Northeast Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation (NEPARC) steering committee. Duncan is a Professional Wetland Scientist and member of the Society of Wetland Scientists. In his spare time, he enjoys hiking with his dog and learning how to fly fish.

 

Restoring the Northernmost Freshwater Tidal Marsh on the Delaware River

By Kelsey Mattison, Marketing Coordinator

Located in Hamilton Township, New Jersey, Mercer County’s John A. Roebling Memorial Park offers residents in the surrounding area a freshwater marsh with river fishing, kayaking, hiking, and wildlife-watching. The park contains the northernmost freshwater tidal marsh on the Delaware River, Abbott Marshland. Since the mid-1990s, many public and private partnerships have developed to help support the preservation of this important and significant marsh.

Tidal marshes, like the 3,000-acre Abbott Marshlands, contain valuable habitat for many rare species like River Otter, American eel, Bald Eagle, and many species of wading birds. Unfortunately, the Abbott Marshland has experienced a significant amount of loss and degradation, partially due to the introduction of the invasive Phragmites australis, or, Common Reed.

Phragmites australis

Phragmites australis is a species of grass that has a non-native invasive form that creates extensive strands in shallow water or on damp ground. The reed tends to colonize disturbed wetlands and then spreads very rapidly, outcompeting desirable native plant species. Once it is established, it forms a monoculture with a dense mat and does not allow any opportunity for native plants to compete. This impairs the natural functioning of the marsh ecosystem by altering its elevations and tidal reach which impacts plant and animal communities. Over the last century, there has been a dramatic increase in the spread of Phragmites australis, partly due to development impacts that resulted in disturbances to wetlands.

For the Mercer County, Princeton Hydro put together a plan to reduce and control the Phragmites australis, in order to increase biodiversity, to improve recreational opportunities, and to improve visitor experience at the park. This stewardship project will replace the Phragmites australis with native species with a goal to reduce its ability to recolonize the marsh. In September, our Vice President Mark Gallagher and Senior Project Manager Kelly Klein presented our plan to the public at the Tulpehaking Nature Center.

Vice President Mark Gallagher presenting on the project at the Tulpehaking Nature Center.

Princeton Hydro conducted a Floristic Quality Assessment to identify invasive areas and performed hydrologic monitoring to understand tidal stage elevations. Phase 1 of the restoration process occurred this fall and included herbicide applications to eradicate the Phragmites australis. The herbicide used, Imazapyr, is USEPA and NJDEP approved and our field operation crew applied it using our amphibious vehicle called a Marsh Master. For harder to reach areas, we used our airboat.

According to a USDA report, Imazapyr has been extensively studied, and when properly applied, it has no impact to water quality, aquatic animal life, birds, or mammals, including humans. It works by preventing plants from producing a necessary enzyme called acetolactate synthase.

The goal of this wetland restoration project is to enhance plant diversity, wildlife habitat, and water quality in John A. Roebling Memorial Park. In late spring of 2019, we will revisit the site to continue spraying the Phragmites australis. By Spring of 2020, we expect to see native species dominating the landscape from the newly exposed native seed bank with minimal Phragmites australis. Stay tuned for more photos from the field when our Field Crew returns to the site for Phase II in early Spring!   

View of John A. Roebling Memorial Park from the access road.

For more information about Princeton Hydro’s invasive species removal and wetland restoration services, visit: bit.ly/InvasivesRemoval 

Kelsey Mattison is a recent graduate of St. Lawrence University with a degree in English and environmental studies and a passion for environmental communication. Through her extracurricular work with various nonprofit organizations, Kelsey has developed expertise in content writing, storytelling, verbal communication, social media management, and interdisciplinary thinking. Her responsibilities at Princeton Hydro include social media management, proposal coordination, editorial overview, and other marketing tasks. As a member of the Princeton Hydro team, she aims to further its mission by taking creative approaches to communicating about our shared home: Planet Earth.

Mitigation Milestone Reached at Mattawoman Creek Mitigation Site

Photo courtesy of GreenVest

Mattawoman Creek Mitigation Project will Restore and Protect 80+ Acres of Mattawoman Creek, Chesapeake Bay’s Most Productive Tributary

As one of the Chesapeake Bay’s most productive tributaries and a vital part of Maryland’s natural resources, Mattawoman Creek supports some of the largest populations of finfish, amphibians, and birds in the state. A collaborative team of private and public sector entities have designed the “Mattawoman Creek Mitigation Site” in Pomfret, Charles County, Maryland, an effort that will enhance or create 64+ acres of wetlands and restore nearly 3,800 linear feet of this perennial stream.  With over 28,500 native trees and shrubs to be planted, this mitigation project will result in 80+ acres of continuous, forested wetland with complex and diverse vegetative communities. It is expected to provide a wide array of habitat to resident and transient wildlife, including birds, reptiles, invertebrates, amphibians and rare, threatened and endangered species.

Unique to this project, Mattawoman Creek Mitigation Site is Maryland’s first-ever Umbrella Mitigation Banking Instrument (UMBI) for federal and other government agency use.   A UMBI is the bundling of multiple mitigation banks into one agreement in order to streamline the regulatory approval process, thereby eliminating steps and involving fewer resources. The Maryland UMBI document helps the USAF and other public agencies secure certainty of cost and schedule, facilitate timely permit issuance, and expedite the satisfaction of their permitted requirements for planned capital improvement projects. This approach also maximizes the scale of restoration and resulting land protection and efforts, creating contiguous blocks of habitat with greatly enhanced benefits compared to single, permittee-responsible projects. This precedent was a result of a partnership between United States Air Force (USAF) and Joint Base Andrews (JBA), U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE), GreenTrust Alliance, GreenVest, and Princeton Hydro.

Projects completed under the UMBI will reduce federal and state workload expediting the regulatory review and issuance of permits by the MDE and USACE. Additionally, projects completed under this UMBI will aid in compliance with the Federal Paperwork Reduction Act where federal regulatory staff can evaluate success and performance issues for multiple permittees at one single habitat restoration or mitigation site. In addition, federal costs are capped, and liabilities  are transferred through to GreenVest, the private sector operator, and GreenTrust Alliance, the nonprofit bank sponsor, who will also serve as the long-term steward of sites restored under this program.

Pictured is the southern restoration area after
sorghum germination, prior to wetland creation
and reestablishment.
A function-based stream assessment was
performed on the degraded channel.

 

Photo courtesy of GreenVestDesign, engineering/modeling, and permitting of the site was completed by  Princeton Hydro and GreenVest under our currently Ecosystem Restoration contract with the USACE. Princeton Hydro also provided an Environmental Assessment and Environmental Baseline Survey, and conducted a geotechnical investigation, which included the advancement of test pits, visual and manual investigation techniques and logging, infiltration testing, laboratory soils testing, and seasonal high-water table estimations.

A wetland water budget was also developed for the proposed wetland creation and restoration to determine if sufficient water is available to establish or reestablish wetlands on the site. It was also used to inform design development including proposed grading and plant community composition. The establishment and re-establishment of wetlands on the site will be accomplished through directed grading, ditch plugging and stream restoration designed to maximize the retention of surface water, floodplain re-connection, and groundwater inputs.

Highlights from the Mattawoman Creek Wetland and Stream Mitigation project:
  • 80 acres of land were placed into conservation easement and removed from active row crop production and cattle pasture. The easement, which is held by GreenTrust Alliance, provides permanent protection for all 80 acres.
  • Over 64 acres of wetlands will be restored, created, enhanced or preserved, which will sequester approximately 75 tons of carbon per year.
  • 3,798 linear feet of perennial stream will be restored by re-establishing, historic floodplain access during more frequent storm events, stabilizing hydraulics and geomorphology, and adding aquatic habitat value.
  • Full integration of the wetland and stream restoration elements will occur exponentially, increasing anticipated functions and values in the post construction condition. Functions include: storm damage and flood attenuation, groundwater recharge and discharge, nutrient cycling and sequestration, local water quality improvement, and wildlife habitat enhancements.
  • This project will also create and enhance the forested wetland and stream habitat for the State-listed Threatened Selys’ Sundragon (Helocordulia selysii).
  • As part of the site design, over 28,500 native trees and shrubs will be planted.
  • The Mattawoman Creek Mitigation Site is located within a Tier 3 Biodiversity Conservation Network area. These areas are classified by the Department of Natural Resources as “highly significant for biodiversity conservation” and are priority conservation areas that support critical species and habitats.
  • The project will yield advanced mitigation values: 7.913 in wetland credits and 1,595 in stream credits. These credits are durable and will be available for JBA’s use in order to satisfy permitted impacts associated with planned capital improvement projects.

Over 6,000 acres (25%) of the Mattawoman Creek watershed has been protected by public ownership and various conservation and agricultural easements, which, in addition to the Mattawoman Creek Mitigation Site, help ensure that Mattawoman Creek forever remains a high-quality destination for outdoor recreation.

Princeton Hydro specializes in the planning, design, permitting, implementing, and maintenance of tidal and freshwater wetland rehabilitation projects. To learn more about our wetland restoration, creation, and enhancement services, visit: http://bit.ly/PHwetland

Innovative and Effective Approach to Wetland Restoration

The Pin Oak Forest Conservation Area is a 97-acre tract of open space that contains an extremely valuable wetland complex at the headwaters of Woodbridge Creek. The site is located in a heavily developed landscape of northern Middlesex County and is surrounded by industrial, commercial, and residential development. As such, the area suffered from wetland and stream channel degradation, habitat fragmentation, decreased biodiversity due to invasive species, and ecological impairment. The site was viewed as one of only a few large-scale freshwater wetland restoration opportunities remaining in this highly developed region of New Jersey.

Recognizing the unique qualities and great potential for rehabilitating and enhancing ecological function on this county-owned parkland, a dynamic partnership between government agencies, NGOs, and private industry, was formed to restore the natural function of the wetlands complex, transform the Pin Oak Forest site into thriving habitat teeming with wildlife, and steward this property back to life. The team designed a restoration plan that converted 28.94 acres of degraded freshwater wetlands, 0.33 acres of disturbed uplands dominated by invasive species, and 1,018 linear feet of degraded or channelized streams into a species-rich and highly functional headwater wetland complex.

BEFORE
View of stream restoration area upon commencement of excavation activities. View of containerized plant material staged prior to installation.

 

We used an innovative approach to restore the hydraulic connection of the stream channel with its floodplain in order to support wetland enhancement. Additionally, to further enhance wetlands with hydrologic uplift, the team incorporated microtopography techniques, which creates a variable surface that increases groundwater infiltration and niches that support multiple habitat communities. This resulted in a spectrum of wetland and stream habitats, including the establishment of a functional system of floodplain forest, scrub shrub, emergent wetlands and open water. Biodiversity was also increased through invasive species management, which opened the door for establishing key native flora such as red maple, pin oak, swamp white oak, and swamp rose. The restored headwater wetland system also provides stormwater quality management, floodplain storage, enhanced groundwater recharge onsite, and surface water flows to Woodbridge Creek.

Completed in 2017, the integrated complex of various wetland and upland communities continues to provide high quality habitat for a wide variety of wildlife species including the state-threatened Black-crowned Night heron and Red-headed Woodpecker. The work done at the site significantly enhanced ecological function, providing high-quality habitat on indefinitely-preserved public lands that offer countless benefits to both wildlife and the community.

AFTER
Post-restoration in 2018, looking Northeast. View of wetland enhancement approximately 2 months after completion of seeding and planting activities.

 

Public and private partnerships were and continue to be critical to the success of this project. The diverse partnership includes Middlesex County Office of Parks and Recreation, Woodbridge Township, Woodbridge River Watch, New Jersey Freshwater Wetlands Mitigation Council, GreenTrust Alliance, GreenVest, and Princeton Hydro. The partners joined together as stakeholders to identify long term restoration and stewardship goals for Pin Oak Forest Preserve, and nearly four years later, the partners all remain involved in various aspects of managing the property and this project itself, ranging from fiscal oversight by New Jersey Freshwater Wetland Mitigation Council and GreenTrust Alliance, to permit and landowner access coordination performed by Woodbridge Township and Middlesex County, or the ongoing stewardship, maintenance, and monitoring of the project and the larger park, being conducted by being conducted by GreenTrust Alliance, GreenVest, and NJ Department of Environmental Protection.

This project was funded through the New Jersey Freshwater Wetland In-Lieu Fee program. In 2014, GreenTrust Alliance, GreenVest, and Princeton Hydro secured $3.8 million dollars of funding on behalf of the Middlesex County Parks Department to restore three wetland sites, which included Pin Oak Forest.

The Pin Oak Forest project is a great model for showcasing a successful approach to the enhancement of public lands through a dynamic multidisciplinary, multi-stakeholder partnership. And, because of proper planning and design, it has become a thriving wildlife oasis tucked in the middle of a densely-populated suburban landscape.

Princeton Hydro specializes in the planning, design, permitting, implementing, and maintenance of wetland rehabilitation projects. To learn more about our wetland restoration, creation, and enhancement services, visit: bit.ly/PHwetland

Teaching NYC High Schoolers About Wetlands

Ms. Hannah Goldstein and her Environmental Science students at Franklin Delano Roosevelt High School in Brooklyn, NY welcomed Emily Bjorhus, Princeton Hydro Environmental Scientist, to be a guest speaker on the topic of wetlands. The students, 10th, 11th, and 12th graders, learned what defines a wetland, how wetlands function, and why wetland ecosystems are important to our communities. Emily also taught the students how to identify wetlands in the field.

The presentation also involved hands-on instruction, which included a trip outside to the school courtyard where students learned how to collect soil samples using an auger and how to determine if hydric soils are present. To identify surrounding trees, students used a dichotomous key, a tool that allows users to make a series of choices based on characteristics such as leaf and fruit shape. Using the skills and information they learned, Emily helped each classroom determine whether a wetland was present. As it turns out, the courtyard in the middle of Franklin Delano Roosevelt High School does not contain a wetland!

“Science is such an important subject matter for kids to be learning for a variety of reasons. Environmental science education in particular encourages thought patterns, which get kids engaged in real-world environmental protection activities,”  said Emily. “I really enjoyed working with Ms. Goldstein and her students. I hope my presentation inspires the students to learn more about wetlands and become ambassadors of wetland conservation.”

To learn more about Princeton Hydro’s tidal and freshwater wetland services, visit: bit.ly/PHwetland

“2018 Land Ethics Award of Merit” awarded to Mullica River Wetland Mitigation Project

At the 18th Annual Land Ethics Symposium, which is presented by Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve, Princeton Hydro and GreenVest, LLC were honored with the “2018 Land Ethics Award of Merit” for our restoration work at the Mullica River Wetland Mitigation Site.

We teamed up to restore the natural wetland hydrology on a 34-acre parcel of land which was heavily impaired and intensely manipulated for cranberry production over the last century. The area was home to a network of earthen berms surrounding cranberry cultivating bogs, where water onsite was managed through a series of ditches and water control structures set into the berms. The cranberry operation was bordered mostly by an Atlantic white cedar dominated swamp.

“Thank you to Bowman’s Hill for honoring this successful wetland restoration project,” said Mark Gallagher, Vice President of Princeton Hydro. “Through our partnership with GreenVest, we transformed a degraded cranberry bog into thriving emergent and forested wetlands, and restored historic headwater stream channels. These restored wetlands are providing invaluable habitat to a variety of threatened and endangered species in New Jersey, including the Pine Barrens Treefrog and Barred Owl.” 

 

While this site was degraded, it still contained four state listed species, including the state-endangered Timber Rattlesnake and the Pine Barrens Tree Frog, making it a priority site for restoration. The presence of these species influenced the design as it included provisions to incorporate habitat elements for these species.

Through the implementation of restoration activities focused on removing the site’s agricultural infrastructure, Princeton Hydro and GreenVest were able to restore a natural wetland system on the site. In addition, the restoration project reconnected the site to its floodplain and re-established a natural stream channel. The expansive, flat and wide floodplain wetland complex of the Alquatka Branch of the Mullica RIver provides floodplain connectivity for relatively frequent storm events and allows for a sustainable floodplain wetland complex in the former cranberry bog cells.

The completed project incorporated a balance of both ecological and human health and safety benefits. Additionally, the project involved innovative restoration techniques that required building consensus among local watershed protection groups and state and regional regulators, including New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and the New Jersey Pinelands Commission. In the end, the project restored 34 acres of a highly functioning forested wetland/upland complex and reestablished 1,600+ linear feet of historic headwater stream channels.

Princeton Hydro would like to thank Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve for both the award and for a organizing another successful Land Ethics Symposium. The conference focused on ways to create low-maintenance, economical and ecologically balanced landscapes using native plants and restoration techniques. Princeton Hydro was a proud “Friends Sponsor” of the event.

 

Conservation Spotlight: FORTESCUE SALT MARSH AND AVALON TIDAL MARSH RESTORATION

HABITAT RESTORATION THROUGH APPLICATION OF DREDGED MATERIAL

New Jersey, like other coastal states, has been losing coastal wetland habitats to a combination of subsidence, erosion and sea level rise. The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection received a grant from the National Fish and Wildlife Federation to address this issue and rejuvenate these critical habitats. Grantees were charged with providing increased resilience to natural infrastructure that will in turn increase the resiliency of coastal communities in the face of future storms like Hurricane Sandy.

As a consultant for GreenTrust Alliance, a land conservancy holding company, Princeton Hydro worked with several project partners, including NJDEP, the US Army Corps of Engineers, NJDOT, The Wetlands Institute, and The Nature Conservancy, to increase the marsh elevation to an optimal range where vegetation, and the wildlife that depends on it, can flourish. One of the techniques used for this project included the use of dredged material disposal placement, which involves using recycled sand and salt dredged from navigation channels to boost the elevation of the degraded marsh.

A media statement from NJDEP further explained the process, “sediments dredged from navigation channels and other areas are pumped onto eroding wetlands to raise their elevations enough to allow native marsh grasses to flourish or to create nesting habitats needed by some rare wildlife species. Healthy marshes with thick mats of native grasses can cushion the impact of storm surges, thereby reducing property damage.”

FORTESCUE SALT MARSH

The salt marsh at the Fortescue project site is part of the Fortescue Wildlife Management Area. The specific goal of the project was to restore and enhance the interior high and low marsh, coastal dune and beach habitats.

To achieve these habitat enhancements, the Princeton Hydro project team first established biological benchmarks of each targeted habitat type and evaluated them to determine the upper and lower elevational tolerances for target communities and plant species. Approximately 33,300 cubic yards of dredged materials were used to restore a degraded salt marsh, restore an eroded dune, and replenish Fortescue Beach. The eroded dune was replaced with a dune designed to meet target flood elevations and protect the marsh behind it against future damage. The dune was constructed using dredged sand, and, to prevent sediment from entering the waterways, a Filtrexx containment material was used.

AVALON TIDAL MARSH

This project site is a tidal marsh complex located within a back-bay estuary proximal to Stone Harbor and Avalon. Princeton Hydro and project partners aimed to enhance the marsh in order to achieve the primary goal of restoring the natural function of the tidal marsh complex.

Two main activities were conducted in order to apply the dredged material to the impaired marsh plain: 1.) the placement of a thin layer of material over targeted areas of existing salt marsh to increase marsh elevations, 2.) the concentrated placement of material to fill expanding pools by elevating the substrate to the same elevation as the adjacent marsh. In total, dredged material was distributed among eight distinct placement areas throughout the property’s 51.2 acres.

These coastal wetland restoration activities will help to prevent the subsidence-based marsh loss by filling isolated pockets of open water and increasing marsh platform elevation. In addition, the beneficial reuse of dredged material facilitates routine and post-storm dredging and improves the navigability of waterways throughout the U.S.

NJ Audubon undertakes $470G study of climate change impact on wetlands

Princeton Hydro is proud to be a partner on this incredible project

If you’ve ever gone birdwatching at any east coast wildlife refuge, then you probably understand the value of coastal impoundments. These man-made wetland habitats are contained by embankments and have gates that allow managers to manipulate water levels. In addition to being valuable, these structures are also very vulnerable to sea level rise and extreme weather.

Through a $470,000 federal grant, the New Jersey Audubon is implementing an initiative to study the vulnerability of these impoundments to climate change induced environmental impacts. Funded by the U.S. Department of the Interior via the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, the Coastal Impoundment Vulnerability and Resilience Project (CIVRP) aims to map and catalog all state, federal, and privately owned coastal impoundments from Virginia to Maine. The project is a cooperative effort of a diverse team of partners including researchers from New Jersey Audubon, National Wildlife Federation, Conservation Management Institute (Virginia Tech), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Princeton Hydro.

The CIVRP will ultimately reduce climate vulnerability and enhance the natural ecosystem function of these precious and treasured wetland habitats. Read the full article from MyCentralJersey.

Princeton Hydro specializes in the restoration, creation and enhancement of tidal and freshwater wetlands. Contact us to learn more, and read about some of our award-winning wetland-related projects here.