2019 Successes: A Year in Review

Over the last two decades, we’ve restored many miles of rivers, improved water quality in hundreds of ponds and lakes, and enhanced thousands of acres of ecosystems in the Mid-Atlantic and New England regions. In 2019, we had our best year yet. As we reflect back on 2019 and set our sights on 2020, we have many successes to celebrate:

1. We Designed the Largest Dam Removal in New Jersey.

The century-old Columbia Dam was removed and fish passage was restored on the 42-mile long Paulins Kill river, an important tributary to the Delaware River in northwestern New Jersey. On Earth Day 2019, just two months after the river finally flowed free, we were thrilled to discover the return of American shad upstream for the first time in over 100 years.

Hudson River Bear Mountain Bridge (Photo from Wikipedia)

2. We Conceptualized Six Sites Along the Hudson River for Habitat Restoration.

Our team completed a feasibility study for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), which identified and conceptualized restoration opportunities at six key sites. For this Hudson River Habitat Restoration Integrated Feasibility Study and Environmental Assessment, Princeton Hydro collected and analyzed data, reviewed existing conditions, and drafted conceptual restoration designs. Our final report was just highlighted by USACE at the 2019 Planning Community of Practice (PCoP) national conference at the Kansas City District as an example of a successfully implemented Ecosystem Restoration Planning Center of Expertise (ECO-PCX) project.

3. National and Regional News Outlets Featured Princeton Hydro Harmful Algal Bloom Experts.

After a record-breaking number of HABs broke out in lakes across the region, our Aquatics Team was called upon for their expertise and insights into why the outbreak was happening, what could be done to treat it, and what preventative actions will lessen the likelihood of future outbreaks. In addition to being featured in various regional news outlets covering the HABs topic, Princeton Hydro experts were featured in the New York Times and the Washington Post for their leadership at the largest lake in New Jersey, Lake Hopatcong. (Photo credit: Washington Post)

4. Our Staff Presented, Exhibited, and Attended Over 50 Events.

From galas to environmental conferences and river restoration tours to college courses, the Princeton Hydro team participated in more than 50 events throughout 2019. Dr. Clay Emerson, PE taught a Green Infrastructure Stormwater Management Course at Montclair University. Kelsey Mattison, Marketing Coordinator, presented at the 3rd Annual New Jersey Watershed Conference. And, at the New Jersey Land Conservation Rally, we had three presentations on citizen science, marketing strategy, and lake stewardship. Various team members rolled up their sleeves to volunteer to plant trees at Exton Park on Arbor Day, build a rain garden in Clawson Park, and restore eroding shoreline in Point Pleasant. Stayed tuned for more in 2020!

5. We’re Restoring the Northernmost Freshwater Tidal Marsh on the Delaware River.

Mercer County’s John A. Roebling Memorial Park is home to the northernmost freshwater tidal marsh on the Delaware River, Abbott Marshland, an area containing valuable habitat for many rare species. Unfortunately, the area has experienced a significant amount of loss and degradation, partially due to the introduction of the invasive Phragmites australis. The Princeton Hydro team proudly removed this invasive species and is restoring the marsh to enhance plant diversity, wildlife habitat, and water quality.

6. We Upcycled Christmas Trees to Stabilize an Eroding Shoreline for the First Time in NJ.

To prevent further erosion at the Slade Dale Sanctuary in Point Pleasant, dozens of volunteers helped stabilize the shoreline using recycled Christmas trees, a technique never been done before in New Jersey. The 13-acre Slade Dale Sanctuary is an important part of the local ecosystem and much work is being done there to restore the marsh and enhance the ecological function and integrity of the preserve. Princeton Hydro developed a conceptual and engineering design using living shoreline features, including tree vane structures to attenuate wave action, foster sediment accretion, and reduce erosion.

7. Princeton Hydro Earned Three Prestigious Awards.

The Friends of the Presumpscot River awarded Laura Wildman, P.E., with its “Chief Polin Award” for her accomplishments and efforts in bringing life back to the Presumpscot River and rivers across the nation. The New Jersey Highlands Coalition honored Founding Principal Dr. Stephen Souza with a Lifetime Achievement Award, touting his dedication to preserving and protecting New Jersey’s watersheds and natural resources. And, our Pin Oak Forest and Wetland Restoration project earned the “Land Ethics Award of Merit” from Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve for its remarkable restoration achievements.

8. We’re Converting an Urban, Flood-Prone Industrial Site into a Thriving Public Park.

Along the Third River and Spring Brook, two freshwater tributaries of the Passaic River, a former industrial site that is highly-disturbed and flood-prone is being transformed into a thriving public park. The team broke ground on this important ecological restoration and urban wetland creation project in March and the restoration work continues. Princeton Hydro is serving as the ecological engineer to Bloomfield Township providing a variety of services and expertise.

9. Princeton Hydro Welcomed 12 New Staff and Added Two Key Positions.

As part of the expansion of our growing business, Princeton Hydro added 12 team members with expertise and qualifications in a variety of fields. In July, we announced a new executive position in the firm, Chief Operating Officer, to which Kevin M. Yezdimer, P.E. was appointed. We also created an internal Human Resources Department and hired Samara McAuliffe as Employee Relations Manager. Princeton Hydro has grown from a small, four-person idea operating out of a living room to a 65+ person qualified Small Business with six office locations in the Northeast region.

10. New Year, New Locations!

We’re moving on up! In 2019, we moved our D.C. Regional Office down the road from Annapolis, MD to Bowie, MD expanding into a larger office space to accommodate our staff growth and providing opportunity for more growth in the region. And, in late 2019, through our strategic partnership with Merestone Consulting, we opened a sixth office in Wilmington, Delaware. Stay tuned for more information!

 

Thank you for supporting Princeton Hydro and sharing our stories. We truly appreciate each and every one of our clients and partners. Cheers to a fruitful 2020 and beyond!

Feasibility Study Identifies Key Opportunities for Hudson River Habitat Restoration

Hudson River Bear Mountain Bridge (Photo from Wikipedia)

The Hudson River originates at the Lake Tear of the Clouds in the Adirondack Mountains at an elevation of 4,322 feet above sea level. The river then flows southward 315 miles to New York City and empties into the New York Harbor leading to the Atlantic Ocean. The Hudson River Valley lies almost entirely within the state of New York, except for its last 22 miles, where it serves as the boundary between New York and New Jersey.

Hudson River Basin (Image by USACE)Approximately 153 miles of the Hudson River, between the Troy Dam to the Atlantic Ocean, is an estuary. An estuary is defined by the USEPA as “a partially enclosed, coastal water body where freshwater from rivers and streams mixes with salt water from the ocean. Estuaries, and their surrounding lands, are places of transition from land to sea. Although influenced by the tides, they are protected from the full force of ocean waves, winds and storms by landforms such as barrier islands or peninsulas.”

The Hudson River’s estuary encompasses regionally significant habitat for anadromous fish and globally rare tidal freshwater wetland communities and plants, and also supports significant wildlife concentrations. As a whole, the Hudson River provides a unique ecosystem with highly diverse habitats for approximately 85% of New York State’s fish and wildlife species, including over 200 fish species that rely on the Hudson River for spawning, nursery, and forage habitat.

The Hudson is an integral part of New York’s identity and plays a vital role in the lives of the people throughout the area. Long valued as a transportation corridor for the region’s agricultural and industrial goods, and heavily used by the recreation and tourism industries, the Hudson plays a major role in the local economy. It also provides drinking water for more than 100,000 people.

At the end of the American Revolution, the population in the Hudson River Valley began to grow. The introduction of railroad travel in 1851 further accelerated development in the area. Industrial buildings were erected along the river, such as brick and cement manufacturing, which was followed by residential building. Along with the aforementioned development, came the construction of approximately 1,600 dams and thousands of culverts throughout the Hudson River.

According to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), these human activities have significantly degraded the integrity of the Hudson River ecosystem and cumulatively changed the morphology and hydrology of the river. Over time, these changes have resulted in large-scale losses of critical shallow water and intertidal wetland habitats, and fragmented and disconnected habitats for migratory and other species. Most of this loss and impact has occurred in the upper third portion of the estuary.

As part of the effort to restore the vital river ecosystem, the USACE New York District launched a Hudson River Habitat Restoration Feasibility Study, which helps to establish and evaluate baseline conditions, develop restoration goals and objectives, and identify key restoration opportunities. Princeton Hydro participated in data collection and analysis, conceptual restoration designs, and preparation of the USACE Environmental Assessment for the Hudson River Habitat Restoration Ecosystem Restoration Draft Integrated Feasibility Study and Environmental Assessment.

Basic map depicting project sites (Created by Princeton Hydro)The study area includes the Hudson River Valley from the Governor Mario M. Cuomo Bridge downstream to the Troy Lock and Dam upstream. The primary restoration objectives include restoring a mosaic of interconnected, large river habitats and restoring lost connectivity between the Hudson River and adjacent ecosystems.

A total of six sites were evaluated using topographic surveys, installation and monitoring of tide gauges, evaluation of dam and fish barrier infrastructure, and field data collection and analysis to support Evaluation of Planned Wetlands (EPW) and Habitat Suitability Indices (HSI) functional assessment models. Literature reviews were also completed for geotechnical, hazardous toxicity radioactive waste, and aquatic organism passage measures.

Multiple alternatives for each of the six sites were created in addition to the preparation of conceptual designs, quantity take-offs, and cost estimates for construction, monitoring and adaptive management, and long-term operation and maintenance activities.

Princeton Hydro also prepared an environmental assessment in accordance with NEPA standards, addressing all six sites along the Hudson River and its tributaries. This assessment served to characterize existing conditions, environmental impacts of the preferred Proposed Action and No Action Alternatives, and regional cumulative environmental impacts. Our final report was highlighted by USACE at the 2019 Planning Community of Practice (PCoP) national workshop at the Kansas City District as an example of a successfully implemented Ecosystem Restoration Planning Center of Expertise (ECO-PCX) project.

USACE’s specific interest in Hudson River restoration stems from the aforementioned dramatic losses of regional ecosystems, the national significance of those ecosystems, and the apparent and significant opportunity for measurable improvement to the degraded ecological resources in the river basin.

The feasibility study is among the first of several critical steps in restoring the Hudson River’s ecosystem function and dynamic processes, and reestablishing the attributes of a natural, functioning, and self-regulated river system. Stay tuned for more updates on the Hudson River restoration efforts.

Flipping the Script on American Environmental Thought: FREE Presentation Download

 

The Watershed Institute held its 3rd Annual New Jersey Watershed Conference, an educational event that aims to advance knowledge and communications on issues related to water quality and quantity across the state. The event included a variety of presentations from local experts on watershed management, stormwater, and problems and solutions related to the health of New Jersey’s watersheds.

During the conference, Princeton Hydro’s Marketing Coordinator Kelsey Mattison, a St. Lawrence University graduate with a degree in English and environmental studies, lead a workshop that explored binaries in environmental thought and how to break through those limiting thought processes in order to advance a more productive and shared understanding of our natural world.

The presentation, titled “Flipping the Script on American Environmental Thought,” discussed how black-and-white thought processes (a.k.a. binaries) cause us to view issues as one or the other, leaving little to no room for the possibility of blending the two.

Historically, American thought has viewed environmental issues through a binary lens: either we favor human society, or we favor the environment, and this juxtaposition has rarely allowed for integration between the two perspectives.

Take, for example, the two concepts of preservation and conservation toted by John Muir and Gifford Pinchot, respectively. Muir’s concept of preservation argued that humans should set land aside to leave untouched to preserve its natural beauty, while Pinchot’s concept of conservation advocated for a responsible use of the land’s resources. Both are forms of environmental advocacy, but neither leave much room to combine the two ideas, ultimately creating a black and white binary surrounding human responsibility to the planet. This makes it difficult to then make any compromise on issues related to managing or utilizing our natural resources.

The workshop also explored answers to the important question of: “How do we flip the script to be more inclusive?” Participants discussed ideas around utilizing Values-Based Communication in order to connect with people from different groups/with different values. A few of the communication strategies Kelsey presented, include:

  • Finding Common Ground:

    When groups are telling such different narratives, it can be hard to see that their goals might actually be completely in line. By first identifying what each group’s priorities are, we can better understand their needs in order to help fulfill them. This allows people with seemingly conflicting beliefs to work towards a common goal.

  • Seeing More than Two Sides:

    Generally, people default to thinking there are only two sides to an issue, but no conflict is ever truly just one thing or the other. Even if there are overtly two options, the issue is always more complex. When resolving conflict, it’s almost always possible to find at least one thing the two sides have in common.

Overall, Kelsey’s workshop emphasized the importance of open-mindedness and inclusion in our approach to environmental action in order to bring people together and foster real change. If you’re interested in learning more, click here for a free download of Kelsey’s full presentation.

The New Jersey Watershed Conference, of which Princeton Hydro was a sponsor and exhibitor, also included presentations on topics ranging from urban flooding to microplastics in our waterways to green infrastructure. Dr. Fred Lubnow, Princeton Hydro’s Director of Aquatic Programs, presented on the “Causes and Impacts of Harmful Algal Blooms.” To view the complete agenda, go here.

Princeton Hydro is a proud supporter of The Watershed Institute, a nonprofit organization comprised of policy advocates, scientists, land and water stewards, naturalists, and educators. Focused on the Central New Jersey area, the Watershed Institute speaks out for water and environment, protects and restores sensitive habitats, tests waterways for pollution, and inspires others to care for the natural world. For more information, or to become a member, go here.