About phadmin

Princeton Hydro was formed in 1998 with the specific mission of providing integrated ecological and engineering consulting services. Offering expertise in aquatic and terrestrial ecology, water resources engineering, and geotechnical investigations, our staff provides a full suite of environmental services. Our team has the skill sets necessary to conduct highly comprehensive assessments; develop and design appropriate, sustainable solutions; and successfully bring those solutions to fruition. As such, our ecological investigations are backed by detailed engineering analyses, and our engineering solutions fully account for the ecological and environmental attributes and features of the project site. We take great pride in our reputation with both clients and regulators for producing high-quality projects over a wide variety of service areas; doing so requires a highly skilled team committed to keeping abreast with current research, technology and regulations. Our capabilities are reflected in our award-winning projects that consistently produce real-world, cost-effective solutions for even the most complex environmental problems.

Photo Contest! Show Your #LakesAppreciation on Instagram to Win $100

Did you know that lakes contain about 90% of all surface water on Earth, not counting the oceans? That’s a whole lot to appreciate! And, luckily Lakes Appreciation Month is right around the corner!

July 1 marks the beginning of Lakes Appreciation Month. To encourage active participation in this month-long celebration, we’re holding a #LakesAppreciation Instagram photo contest where you can show us how you appreciate lakes! The winner will receive a $100 Amazon gift card.

CONTEST DETAILS & GUIDELINES: 

We want to see how YOU appreciate lakes! Send us photos of yourself actively participating in lake appreciation. Make sure to read the contest guidelines and conditions listed below. Need some inspiration? Scroll down for a list of suggestions to get your creativity flowing.

HOW TO ENTER THE CONTEST:
  • During the month of July, get out on your local lakes and participate in an appreciation activity.
  • Snap a photo of yourself doing a lake appreciation activity and post it to Instagram. You must use this hashtag #LakesAppreciation in your caption and tag Princeton Hydro (@princeton_hydro) in the photo.
    • In order for us to view your entry and your photo to be eligible for the contest, your account or post must be public.
    • Entries must be submitted as regular posts on your profile in order to qualify, but we also encourage you to add the picture to your story!
PHOTO GUIDELINES:

Each Post Must Include the Following:

  • A lake photo
  • You actively participating in an appreciation activity
  • A caption explaining what you did and why you appreciate your lakes!
  • #LakesAppreciation
  • @princeton_hydro tagged

One lucky winner will be randomly selected on August 1, 2019. The selected winner will receive a $100 gift card to Amazon. We’ll reach out to you via social media to collect your email and address for prize distribution. If the winner does not respond within five working days with the appropriate information, we will select another winner at random. Good luck, everyone!

GETTING STARTED:

Not sure how to get started? We’ve got you covered with a few ideas! Here are 10 ways you can show your lake appreciation:

  1. Relax on the lake: Whether you enjoy swimming, relaxing on the shoreline, sailing, canoeing, or kayaking, there are countless ways you can get outside and enjoy your community lakes.
  2. Go fishing: There’s nothing quite like relaxing on the shoreline with a fishing pole in your hand. Whether you’re there to catch and release or want to take your catches home, fishing is a great way to unwind. Go get your license (if you’re above the age of 16), check your local fishing rules and regulations, and cast a line in your local lake!
  3. new jersey ospreyBreak out the binoculars:  Lakes are great spots to go birding! Download the eBird app to track your bird sightings and see what fellow birders have reported in the area. Also, keep your eyes peeled for ospreys; New Jersey has an osprey conservation project with a map to track all the recent sighting reports.
  4. #TrashTag – Clean it up: One super quick and easy thing to do is clean up your local lake. You can get a small group of friends together or just go out on your own – no effort is too small! You’ll be able to immediately see the benefits of your actions when the trash-lined shore is clear. In addition to the Lakes Appreciation Photo contest tags, make sure you use #trashtag, a global viral cleanup challenge that shows people’s before and after pictures of their cleaning efforts so that you can be a part of that growing trend!
  5. Get involved with your local lake: You can help support your favorite lake by joining a lake or watershed association. As an organized, collective group, lake associations work toward identifying and implementing strategies to protect water quality and ecological integrity. Lake associations monitor the condition of the lake, develop lake management plans, provide education about how to protect the lake, work with the government entities to improve fish habitat, and much more.
  6. Remove invasive species: One of the most harmful elements of lake ecosystems are invasive species. So, by properly removing and discarding them, you can really help a lake to achieve its most desired state. A list of possible invasive species can be found here. For inspiration, check out this blog, written by our Senior Limnologist, Mike Hartshorne.
  7. Call on your inner-artist and draw a lake scene: All you need is a notepad, a pencil, and some spare time to let your imagination and creative skills take over. Does your lake have ducks? Are there people swimming? Is the sun rising or setting? Snap a picture of you with your art!
  8. Monitor and report algae blooms: With the BloomWatch App, you can help the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency understand where and when potential harmful algae blooms (HABs) occur. HABs have the potential to produce toxins that can have serious negative impacts on the health of humans, pets, and our ecosystems. Learn more and download the app.
  9. Join the “Secchi Dip-In” contest: The “Secchi Dip-In” is an annual citizen science  event created by NALMS during which lake-goers and associations across North America use a simple Secchi disk to monitor the transparency or turbidity of their local waterway. Visit their website to find out how to join their contest!
  10. Create your own experience: Write a sonnet about one of your lake experiences. Snap a picture of you sitting out by the water’s edge. Share your favorite lake memory on social media. Collect shells. Play a round of SpikeBall or CanJam in the surrounding area. With permission from the lake owner, plant some native species around the water. The possibilities are endless for lake appreciation!

Still having trouble thinking of an activity to do? Visit the NALMS’s website!

fishing on lake

ADDITIONAL CONTEST CONDITIONS:

By submitting an entry (Photograph) via Instagram to Princeton Hydro’s 2019 #LakesAppreciation Month Contest, you agree to the following: You represent and warrant that:

  • You are the sole and exclusive author and owner of the Photograph submitted and all rights therein; and
  • You have the full and exclusive right, power, and authority to submit the Photograph; and
  • You irrevocably grant Princeton Hydro a non-exclusive, worldwide, royalty-free, perpetual license to use the Photograph in any manner related to the Contest, including all associated use, reproduction, distribution, sublicense, derivative works, and commercial and non-commercial exploitation rights in any and all media now known or hereafter invented, including, but not limited to public relations purposes, posting on social media accounts, and/or for company marketing materials; and
  • No rights in the Photograph have been previously granted to any person, firm, corporation or other entity, or otherwise encumbered such that the prior grant would limit or interfere with the rights granted to Princeton Hydro herein; and
  • No part of your Photograph defames or invades the privacy or publicity rights of any person, living or decreased, or otherwise infringes upon any third party’s copyright, trademark or other personal or property rights.

Check out the details and winner of last year’s Lakes Appreciation Month contest:

WINNER! #LakesAppreciation Month Contest Results

:

 

 

Protecting Greenwood Lake’s Water Quality Through Stormwater Management

The summer is upon us and Lakes Appreciation Month is right around the corner, what better time to pay a visit to and learn more about the lakes in your area.

Princeton Hydro conducts work on lakes throughout the Northeast to preserve, protect and improve water quality and ecological health, ensuring that your community lakes can be enjoyed now and into the future. Today, we’re putting the spotlight on Greenwood Lake:

Greenwood Lake, a 7-mile-long interstate lake that straddles the border of New York and New Jersey, is a popular recreation spot for residents and tourists of both states. Considered to be one of the top bass fishing lakes in New Jersey, Greenwood Lake is abundant with largemouth and smallmouth bass, yellow perch, chain pickerel and catfish. The lake is also extensively used by residents for swimming and boating.

For over 35 years, Princeton Hydro’s scientists have worked with New Jersey, local governing municipalities, and the various environmental organizations involved with the protection of Greenwood Lake and its watershed. In the early 2000s, we developed a comprehensive Restoration Plan and a proactive monitoring program that we have used over the years to properly manage the lake and its watershed. The plan was developed for the Greenwood Lake Commission and the Township of West Milford with funding provided through the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection’s Nonpoint Source 319(h) Program. The Restoration Plan focuses heavily on the implementation of various types of stormwater best management practices (BMPs) to help reduce the influx of sediment and nutrients into the lake. We track the positive effects and benefits achieved through these stormwater projects by conducting both storm-event based and in-lake water quality monitoring.

The goal of the stormwater-based efforts is to ensure the lake’s total phosphorus (TP) load is systematically reduced in accordance with the lake’s established Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL). The TMDL is a regulatory term in the U.S. Clean Water Act, that identifies the maximum amount of a pollutant (in this case phosphorus) that a waterbody can receive while still meeting water quality standards. Princeton Hydro was instrumental in developing the TMDL for Greenwood Lake. Phosphorus entering the lake from runoff is the primary driver of the lake’s eutrophication. The direct results of eutrophication are increases in the density of aquatic plants and nuisance algae. All this added productivity leads to reduced clarity, reductions in dissolved oxygen concentrations, and a number of other ecological impacts that compromise the quality, aesthetics, and use of the lake.

Last year, Princeton Hydro and the Greenwood Lake Commission, with input from the West Milford Environmental Commission, proposed an updated Watershed Implementation Plan (WIP) for the lake. Approved and funded by the NJ Highlands Council, the updated WIP includes a variety of components that build upon the original Restoration Plan and incorporate newly advanced stormwater management and Nonpoint Source Pollution (NPS) reduction technologies.

Belcher's Creek at Edgecumb and Glencross

The WIP includes in‐lake and stream monitoring; the assessment of the existing stormwater structures installed through grant‐based, watershed activities; and the identification of watershed-based projects that can be completed to support the Lake’s compliance with TMDL TP levels with a specific focus on the stormwater runoff produced by Belcher’s Creek, a major tributary to Greenwood Lake.

The WIP also includes the following nine minimum elements considered necessary by both NJDEP and USEPA for funding eligibility:

  1. Identify causes and sources of pollution
  2. Estimate pollutant loading into the watershed and the expected load reductions
  3. Describe management measures that will achieve load reductions and targeted critical areas
  4. Estimate amounts of technical and financial assistance and the relevant authorities needed to implement the plan
  5. Develop an information/education component
  6. Develop a project schedule
  7. Describe the interim, measurable milestones
  8. Identify indicators to measure progress
  9. Develop a monitoring component

While many of these elements have been indirectly addressed to varying degrees in the original Restoration Plan, in order to maximize Greenwood Lake’s opportunities to obtain State and Federal funding for the design and implementation of watershed control measures, the WIP now explicitly correlates the nine elements to eight specific deliverables, which are as follows:

  1. Conduct a detailed in‐lake and watershed‐based water quality monitoring program and compare the data to that collected in 2004 and 2005 to document changes or shifts in water quality.
  2. Meet with the Township of West Milford, Passaic County and other stakeholders to
    inventory recently completed BMPs and other watershed management measures.
  3. Conduct a field‐based evaluation of the stormwater project completed since the original 319‐grant funded Restoration Plan.
  4. Conduct site assessments to identify other potential stormwater/watershed BMP projects.
  5. Conduct a field assessment of the Belchers Creek Corridor to identify potential Nonpoint Source Pollution Reduction Projects.
  6. Assemble the WIP with all the 9 elements fully satisfied.
  7. Schedule and implement stakeholder and public meetings to evaluate project status.
  8. Submit of final version of WIP to the NJDEP and present the findings and recommendations to the public.

This project was initiated in September 2018 and is projected for completion by September 2019. The Greenwood Lake Commission, serves as the inter‐State steward of the Greenwood Lake watershed, and is working closely with Princeton Hydro and the watershed stakeholders (Township of West Milford, Passaic County and others), to ensure the WIP is a holistic document.

Stay tuned for more Greenwood Lake updates as the WIP progresses. For more information about Princeton Hydro’s lake management projects and capabilities, or to discuss your project needs and goals, please contact us.

Some of the photos utilized in this blog are from The Village of Greenwood Lake.

Employee Spotlight: Meet Our New Team Members

Join us in welcoming ten new team members! We’ve hired four full-time staff and six part-time staff and interns spread throughout our Ringoes, Sicklerville, and Glastonbury offices.

Meet the new team members:

MARCIE ROBINSON, P.E., Senior Project Manager

With nearly two decades of experience in both the private and public sectors, Marcie has extensive knowledge of both facets of the civil engineering world. Her area of expertise includes water resource engineering and more specifically stormwater management, having designed multiple stormwater facilities utilizing best management practices. Marcie has worked on all aspects of land development projects including residential, industrial, commercial, and educational site plans and subdivisions; construction administration; and municipal engineering. She has prepared capital improvement projects for local municipalities and reviewed land development projects for conformance with local ordinances and the NJDEP stormwater regulations.

Outside of work, Marcie enjoys camping, gardening, raising money for various charities, and spending time with her husband, son, and beagle. She is eager to utilize her technical background, problem solving skills, and motivation to contribute to new challenging projects.

SAMARA MCAULIFFE, Executive Advisor & Employee Relations Manager

With over ten years of human resources and management experience, Samara has worked as a business partner and advisor in various sectors, from finance to retail. Her hands-on experience includes researching and resolution of complex human resources related issues, recruitment process management, HRIS implementation, representation at unemployment hearings, creation of EEOC position statements, leading and administering open enrollment initiatives, as well as management coaching and training.

Outside of work, Samara is an active member of her community, volunteering for various causes dear to her heart. She enjoys spending time with her son and daughter and makes every effort to be outside as much as possible, preferably hiking or kayaking.

Marissa Ciocco, Staff Engineer

After spending the last year interning for our Geosciences Engineering Practice Area, we’re thrilled to have Marissa join our team full-time. She is a recent graduate of Rowan University holding a B.S. in Civil and Environmental Engineering with a Bantivoglio Honors Concentration. She was a member of the Orientation Staff for two years and is a member of the Student Alumni Association. She participated in the CREATE’s Fellowship program at Rowan University, and currently helps out at a local french bakery and tea room on the weekends. Her Junior Clinic class experience includes a green roof feasibility study and testing the effects of water quality on masonry mortar. In the future, Marissa hopes to work towards creating a greener and safer environment.

Marissa enjoys playing field hockey, cooking, knitting, car rides, and spending time with family and friends. She also enjoys watching home improvement shows, listening to country music, and mumbling phrases in Italian.

Ivy Babson, Staff Scientist

Ivy, who previously interned with us last summer, recently earned her B.S. in Environmental Science with a concentration in Ecological Design, and minor in Geospatial Technologies from the University of Vermont, and has now joined our team full time. During her studies, she was a member of UVM’s Humanitarian Mapping Club and has “virtually” responded to earthquake and hurricane relief efforts in Puerto Rico, Mexico, Texas, and Afghanistan via interactive spatial imagery programs. Ivy has also been the Art Editor of UVM’s alternative newspaper, drawing attention to environmental and social issues through articles and cartoons. Ivy worked closely through her school with the Vermont Chapter of The Nature Conservancy to create a restoration plan and GIS map of an altered wetland near Lake Champlain that would hopefully help regain the ecosystem services lost from agricultural development. In the future, she hopes to implement ecological design in impacted ecosystems and in urban areas to help rehabilitate and restore damaged resources.

Ivy enjoys drawing, listening to her favorite 90s alt rock bands, road tripping, and watching re-runs of It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia.

eric Libis, Aquatics specialist

Eric Libis is passionate of the outdoors. As a resident of Alaska, Eric has extensive hands on experience with nature in all its forms. Previously, he’s held a variety of positions including small engine mechanic, project manager, and served in the U.S. Army. New to Princeton Hydro, he hopes to expand his conservation skills and knowledge while providing his experience to the field operations team.

Fond of all things outdoors, Eric can (or cannot) be found, hiking in the back-country, mountaineering, rock mineral and fossil collecting, camping (both primitive and modern), boating, fishing, trail-building, and educating the leaders of tomorrow of the importance in preserving nature for everyone to enjoy.

Becca Burrell, Communications Intern

Becca is a senior at the University of Pittsburgh, working to attain a degree in Media and Professional Communications on the Corporate and Community Relations track, along with a certificate in Public and Professional Writing. Through her previous experience and classwork, Rebecca has learned how to engage with others through social media, writing, and marketing. At Pitt, Rebecca is a member of two honor societies, plays intramural field hockey, and is on the events committee for the Imagination Project, a group that dresses as famous characters in kids’ movies/TV shows and visits local children’s hospitals and other rec centers. She is also a student worker in the English Department. At Princeton Hydro, she is excited to promote and further the company’s goals through the use of thoughtful communication strategies.

During her free time, you can find Becca hanging out with her family, friends, and dog. She also enjoys reading, taking walks, and binge-watching shows on Netflix.

Will Kelleher, Environmental Science Intern

Will returns to Princeton Hydro for second summer with our Aquatics team. Will is a rising senior at the University of Vermont, studying Environmental Science with a concentration in Water Resources. His current career interests are focused around wetlands restoration and water chemistry. He recently spent two weeks studying water management and sustainable technology in the Netherlands and in the past has helped with biological and chemical stream monitoring with Raritan Headwaters Association. At school, he is involved in many environmental clubs on campus including Wildlife Society, Beekeeping Club and Green House Residential Sustainability.

Outside his love for the environment, Will is also an avid hockey fan, fisherman, and aspiring traveler of the world.

Nicole King, Water Resources Intern

Nicole is an environmental engineering student with experienced in CAD drafting, technical writing, and environmental sampling processes. Prior to Princeton Hydro, she worked for an automated assembly systems manufacturer where she developed her drafting skills and organized an archive system for their project drawings.As a freshman at the University of New Hampshire, Nicole has participated in research investigating the effect of high precipitation events using coded and built pressure-depth sensors in a dammed reservoir. She is also a part of an entrepreneurship club where she expressed innovation and collaboration with other members.

In her free time, Nicole competitively swims and enjoys reading, drawing, and watching movies.

Nina Petracca, landscape design intern

Nina is a rising senior at Rutgers University studying in the Landscape Architecture Program. In her studies Nina has focused on park design, environmental planning, stream bank restoration and planting design. Her most recent project involved designing a park in Germany to compliment an engineered wetland. When she enters the Rutgers Landscape Architecture MLA Program she plans to focus her education on wetland design and its beneficial relation to the community. Over the course of her internship with us, Nina hopes to gain a better understanding of wetland design and eco-restoration and develop stronger graphic skills.

In her free time Nina enjoys hiking, dancing, cooking, spending time with loved ones and being a bird mom.

Lucas Pick, Environmental Science Intern

Lucas is entering his final year at the College of New Jersey. He is majoring in Biology with a focus in Ecology and Evolution and is minoring in Statistics. He performs research through TCNJ to investigate the interactive effects of deer and invasive species on suburban forest plant communities. He is also working on a capstone study to develop a structural equation model that encompasses the driving factors for oak regeneration. Lucas has been exposed to a wide variety of natural resource management projects, including forest stand improvements, wetland enhancements, stream restorations, and dam removals. He is seeking a career in ecology, agriculture, and natural resource management, and has joined Princeton Hydro in hopes of developing his knowledge of aquatic ecology and environmental science.

In his free time, Lucas enjoys long distance running, playing baseball, and practicing guitar.

Learn more about our team.

 

If You Can’t Beat It, Eat It! How to Make Pesto from Garlic Mustard

By Kelsey Mattison, Marketing Coordinator 

Did you know? There’s a movement across the country, “Eat the Invaders,” working to fight invasive species, “one bite at at time.”  Here in the Northeast, we’ve got a handful of invasive plants, which native predators won’t eat, but are perfectly safe for humans. Even restaurants are popping up with menus designed around harvesting and cooking wild invasives.

Garlic mustard, a plant in the — you guessed it! — mustard family, may seem harmless, but is actually highly invasive and has become a widespread issue across most of the U.S. over the past century and a half. Originating in Europe and parts of Asia, experts believe it was brought to North America for medicinal and/or agricultural purposes in the mid 17th century.

The plant sprouts earlier than many native plants, and establishes quickly, often making it difficult for native plants to successfully establish for the season. It also releases compounds from its roots that prevent other native growth from sprouting. Many people pull and discard garlic mustard plants (but not in the compost pile!) to help control its spread. Some even hire professionals to remove the plant. Princeton Hydro has treated it on various project sites along with other invasive plants.

With high levels of vitamins A and C, zinc, carotenoids, and fiber, it’s a shame to let this invasive take up space in our trash. While invasive to landscapes, this wild plant is safe to eat, so long as it hasn’t been sprayed with any chemical treatments. Garlic mustard leaves can easily be added to sauces, salads, sautées, and more!

How to Harvest and Prepare Garlic Mustard for Cooking:
  1. Correctly identify the garlic mustard plant in your landscape — the rough-toothed leaves and garlic odor when crushed are giveaways.
  2. Assure that it has not been amended/treated by local landscapers or public works.
  3. Make sure there’s no poison ivy growing with it.
  4. Pull up the plant by the roots, making sure not to scatter the seeds as you pull.
  5. Bag the plant to avoid spreading the seeds in transport.
  6. When you’re ready to cook, cut off the leaves.
  7. Discard the stalk and roots in a sealed bag for disposal.
  8. Wash or soak the leaves in water and pat dry.
  9. Start cooking!
Recipe FOR GARLIC MUSTARD PESTO:

1 cup of garlic mustard leaves

2 cloves of garlic

1 cup of basil leaves

¼ cup of walnuts or pine nuts

1 cup of olive oil

½ cup of shredded Parmesan cheese

1 tablespoon of apple cider vinegar

1 tablespoon of maple syrup

1 lemon (squeeze in fresh juice to taste)

Before you start, make sure to thoroughly rinse the garlic mustard and pat dry.

Combine garlic mustard, basil, garlic, and pine nuts in a food processor or blender. Pulse until the ingredients are loosely chopped. Next, add the vinegar, maple syrup, and olive oil and blend until it is smooth. Finally, add the Parmesan cheese and lemon juice to taste. Blend again until smooth. Finally, add salt and pepper to taste.

Pour pesto over pasta, spread on toast, use as a marinade, or do whatever else you’d do with a delicious sauce!

For more information on other edible invasive species, visit Eat the Invaders‘ website.

Kelsey Mattison is Princeton Hydro’s Marketing Coordinator and a recent graduate of St. Lawrence University with a degree in English and environmental studies and a passion for environmental communication. Through her extracurricular work with various nonprofit organizations, she has developed expertise in social media management, content writing, storytelling, and interdisciplinary thinking. In her free time, Kelsey enjoys dancing of all sorts, going on long walks with her camera, and spending time with friends and family in nature.

Part Two: Damned If You Do, Dammed If You Don’t: Making Decisions and Resolving Conflicts on Dam Removal

Credit: FWRA.org

In this two part blog series piece we take a look at addressing and preventing potential conflicts and the key factors involved in dam removal decision-making – to remove or not to remove.

What to Do About Dams

Typically, the decision to remove a dam is made by varying entities, depending on the regulatory oversight of the dam. In most cases, the dam owner itself is the decision-maker, often deciding that the costs of continuing to operate and maintain the dam are more than removing the dam. State dam safety offices can sometimes order a dam to be removed or lowered if there are major safety concerns. State fish and wildlife offices and environmental organizations are also often involved in the decision-making, particularly when the goals of the project include restoration of habitat for migratory and resident aquatic species. If the dam in question is a hydropower facility, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission also has the power to order a hydropower dam under their jurisdiction to be removed for both environmental and safety reasons.

Laura Wildman, P.E., dam removal and river restoration expert and Director of Princeton Hydro’s New England Regional Office, says, “Identifying key barriers early on and understanding which of those barriers might have potential solutions versus remain an impediment, is critical to prioritizing limited ecological restoration resources.”

The careful formulation and communication of the benefits for dam removal specific to each project, adequate education of the public, and stakeholder involvement are incredibly important components to dam removal conflict resolution. As is an understanding that not all dams will or should be removed, and that the local community and stakeholders needs/concerns should be fully integrated into the decision-making process.

Key facets of stakeholder involvement, include:

  • Initial Stakeholder Discussions: Gather information and input from all stakeholders involved
  • Field Work & Initial Assessment: Know the project site inside and out, conduct an in-person inspection, and gather all of the initial data needed to have an informed discussion
  • Report Back with Results, without Judgement: Share the current state of the dam with stakeholders & regulators, without implying any solution or recommendation
  • Detailed Analysis, Feasibility & Alternatives Assessment: Collaboratively select alternative options, and include for a discussion of the alternative analysis process in the pre-application regulatory and stakeholder meetings
  • Formal Regulatory Review w/ Public Meetings: Present solution and/or submit engineering design and permit applications to regulators, and host public meetings to inform the community about the timeline and status.  Some public meetings are required as part of the regulatory process, however, it is important to keep the stakeholders involved in the process. So, additional meetings or presentations are recommend for true engagement.
  • Implementation: If the solution is to remove or repair the dam, continue to update the community about the status and timeline of construction. Local residents, elected officials, and nonprofit groups could be your best allies in keeping everyone informed.

It’s crucial to keep stakeholders and general public informed throughout the process via regular social media and traditional media outreach. Successful projects are based on a transparent process that integrates the local community.  It is the local community that then becomes the environmental stewards of the restored river system.

Celebrating the start of the Columbia Dam removal with the New Jersey Nature Conservancy, American Rivers, Princeton Hydro, USFWS, NJDEP, the local community, and other stakeholders.

 

Analyzing Dams for Removal

There are few “easy” dam removal decisions. Most dams have both positive and negative impacts. The challenge in making a sound decision about whether or not to remove a dam is to identify all of the costs and benefits of keeping (and eventually repairing or replacing) that particular structure, as well as the costs and benefits of removing it, and balance the findings to determine the best option. It is important to ensure that the full range of costs and benefits are identified.

Working through the many issues involved in deciding to keep or remove a dam can offer surprising conclusions that can lead to a reasoned approach – reducing subjectivity and increasing objectivity. The key issues typically investigated include:

  • Impounded sediment
  • Infrastructure/utility impacts
  • Current use (& economic value of dam)
  • Environmental concerns & benefits
  • Geomorphic equilibrium
  • Public health & safety
  • Flooding & hydrologic impacts
  • Aesthetic & sentimental value
  • Historic/archeological
  • Community concerns
  • Sensitive or invasive species
  • Water rights
  • Cost & funding availability

When making a final decision, it’s important to critically examine all factors to understand the influences on the decision. No matter the final outcome, at least it will be a well-informed process, and the information and understanding gained can help shape future decisions.

Although each dam removal project is unique, we developed a standard process that we follow:

While there is often no definitive answer to a question about whether a particular dam should be removed, there is a right and wrong way to go about making a dam removal decision. A good dam removal/retention decision is one that is based on an assessment of all the facts, collaboration with all stakeholders, and objective criteria.

Princeton Hydro has designed, permitted, and overseen the reconstruction, repair, and removal of dozens of dams throughout the Northeast.  To contact us and learn more about our fish passage and dam removal engineering services, visit: bit.ly/DamBarrier.

Revisit part-one of this blog series:

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*FREE DOWNLOADS* 2019 NJ Land Rally Presentations

The New Jersey Conservation Foundation held its 23rd Annual NJ Land Conservation Rally, a one-day educational conference focused on “Conservation Innovations in a Changing World.” The day included networking activities, workshops, and a keynote address given by the First Lady of New Jersey Tammy Snyder Murphy.

During the conference, Princeton Hydro, a proud sponsor of the event, lead three workshops on a variety of topics. Below, we provide a synopsis and free download of each presentation:

 

Fundraising & Marketing Strategy:
“Nonprofit Storytelling A-Z: How to Transform Passive Clickers into Action Takers”

Our Communication Strategist, Dana Patterson, along with Lindsay McNamara of the National Audubon Society lead a workshop that taught participants how to use values-driven and science-congruent narratives to reach key stakeholders and supporters in the New Jersey conservation community and beyond. Dana and Lindsay demonstrated how to implement humanistic storytelling strategies and translate technical stats and science findings into interesting, relatable stories that will resonate with and activate valuable target audiences.

Download the full presentation

 

Community Education & Outreach:
“Floating Classroom: Successful Citizen Science on New Jersey’s Largest Lake”

Chris Mikolajczyk, CLM, our Senior Aquatic Scientist, and Donna Macalle-Holly, Grant and Program Director for Lake Hopatcong Foundation, discussed how to start an innovative citizen science project in the community. For the presentation, they showcased a recently launched and highly successful citizen-science initiative: the “Floating Classroom.” Together, the Lake Hopatcong Foundation and Princeton Hydro conceptualized, funded, and launched a custom-built 40-foot education vessel that provides community members and students an interactive, hands-on education experience to explore Lake Hopatcong while learning about freshwater ecology. This initiative has helped to engage the community in stewardship while continuing to closely monitor the lake’s water quality.

Download the full presentation

 

Ecology & Stewardship:
“From Scum to Fish – A Journey Through the Aquatic Food Web and its Management”

Our Director of Aquatic Programs, Dr. Fred Lubnow, and our Senior Aquatic Ecologist, Dr. Jack Szczepanski, lead a workshop on the many facets that make-up a healthy freshwater ecosystem. They explored the various types of life that inhabit the aquatic environment: from algae and cyanobacteria to submerged aquatic vegetation and fish. And, they delved into each one’s place in the food web, how they interact with each other, their effects on the health of the water they live in, and management techniques to tackle water quality issues associated with each.

Download the full presentation

 

The NJ Land Conservation Rally conference also included presentations on topics ranging from environmental advocacy to land acquisition to urban conservation to non-profit organizational management. To view presentation hand-outs and learn more about the conference, go here.

Princeton Hydro is a proud supporter of the New Jersey Conservation Foundation, a private, nonprofit organization that relies on philanthropic support and grants from a variety of public and private organizations and individual donors. Through acquisition and stewardship, they protect strategic lands, promote strong land use policies, and forge partnerships through education and assistance programs. Since 1960, New Jersey Conservation Foundation has protected over 120,000 acres of natural areas and farmland in New Jersey – from the Highlands to the Pine Barrens to the Delaware Bay, from farms to forests to urban and suburban parks. For more information, or to become a member, go here.

NJ Highlands Coalition Honors Princeton Hydro Founding Principal with “Lifetime Achievement Award”

Julia M. Somers, New Jersey Highlands Coalition Executive Director, and Dr. Stephen Souza, recipient of the NJ Highlands Coalition's Lifetime Achievement Ward
Dr. Stephen Souza, Princeton Hydro Co-Founder, awarded by
New Jersey Highlands Coalition at 4th Annual Golf Outing on May 16

New Jersey Highlands Coalition honored Dr. Stephen Souza, a Founding Principal of Princeton Hydro, with a Lifetime Achievement Award during its 4th Annual Golf Outing held on May 16 at the Hawk Pointe Golf Club. The organization awarded Dr. Souza for his dedication to preserving and protecting New Jersey’s watersheds and natural resources, and the significant improvements he’s made to water quality throughout the state.

“Of all the hydrologists, limnologists, and environmental engineers practicing in New Jersey today, I venture to say none have had the positive impact on New Jersey’s lakes and rivers that Steve has,” said Julia M. Somers, New Jersey Highlands Coalition Executive Director, when presenting the Lifetime Achievement Award to Dr. Souza. “He has personally lifted the level of knowledge and expertise needed to successfully manage, mitigate, and protect our water resources to a much higher and better place than ever before, and we owe him a huge vote of gratitude and thanks. Steve always tells his clients the truth and is uncompromising in protecting the resource. It is a pleasure to present this award to Steve today.”

When accepting the award, Dr. Souza said, “I am truly humbled by this award, and extend my sincerest thanks to everyone here today. More important than coming out for a day of golf and relaxation, is that the funds raised today will help continue to support the Coalition’s efforts to protect the Highlands region’s fragile ecology and surface and groundwater resources.”

New Jersey Highlands Coalition‘s mission is to protect, restore, and enhance the water and other natural and cultural resources of the Highlands. The organization’s Annual Golf Outing brings together environmental advocates and organizations throughout New Jersey to discuss emerging issues, learn about the Highlands Coalition’s key focus areas for the year, network, and play golf!

Princeton Hydro, a proud sponsor of the Golf Outing, has worked directly over the years with the NJ Highlands Coalition, as well as for the NJ Highlands Council and many of the municipalities located within the Highlands, to preserve, protect, and enhance the region’s water, wetland, and woodland resources and sensitive biotic communities.

“We, at Princeton Hydro, are very proud of Steve and his accomplished career, which has been dedicated to enhancing and protecting water resources. The people and ecology of New Jersey are better off because of the direct impact of his work,” said Geoffrey Goll, PE, President of Princeton Hydro. “As a mentor, business partner, and, most important of all, a friend, I am grateful for his leadership over the years.”

Scott Churm and Dr. Stephen SouzaHawk Pointe Golf Club was chosen for this event because it’s a unique setting that incorporates the landscape of the Highlands into the course and uses some of the best-available technology to recycle water and manage its footprint. The 72-par golf course features 18 holes in a beautiful natural area surrounded by wetlands, dense woods, historical landmarks, and glimpses of wildlife.

The golf outing was a scramble format with a shotgun start. In addition to golfing, the event included visual media seminars and a photo contest.

To learn more about New Jersey Highlands Coalition, visit their website.

Princeton Hydro was formed in 1998 with the specific mission of providing integrated ecological and engineering consulting services. Offering expertise in natural resource management, water resources engineering, geotechnical design & investigation, and regulatory compliance, we provide a full suite of services throughout the Mid-Atlantic and New England states. Visit PrincetonHydro.com for more details.

 

June 5: Restoration Ecology Course at Rutgers University

Join us on Wednesday, June 5 for a One-Day Environmental Training Course

Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education is offering a one-day class that explores the utilization of mitigation and sustainable design techniques to reduce stormwater impacts and increase storm resiliency.

The course, designed for ecologists, engineers, planners, and landscape architects involved in the recovery of impacted river, lake, riparian, wetland, and coastal environments, draws heavily upon real-world examples of restoration ecology in practice. This interactive course focuses specifically on the multi-disciplined recovery of degraded, damaged, or impaired ecosystems.

Dr. Stephen Souza, a founding principal of Princeton Hydro and owner of Clean Waters Consulting, LLC, is the main instructor and course coordinator. The course curriculum includes lessons from Dr. Souza and a number of experts from the Princeton Hydro team, including:

  • “River Restoration – Large Scale Dam Removal” lead by President Geoffrey Goll, P.E.
  • “Restoration of Tidal Ecosystems – The Creation of the Bayonne Golf Club” lead by Vice President Mark Gallagher
  • “Green Infrastructure and Coastal Resiliency” lead by Senior Project Manager & Environmental Scientist Christiana Pollack, GISP, CFM
  • “Does Green Infrastructure Mitigate Flooding?” lead by Dr. Souza

Course instruction will also be provided by John Miller, P.E., CFM, CSM, FEMA Mitigation Liaison; Nathaniel Burns, Langan Engineering Project Landscape Architect; and Capt. Al Modjeski, American Littoral Society Habitat Restoration Program Director.

In addition to 0.7 Rutgers CEUs, the course also awards participants with professional credits, including:

  • Landscape Architecture Continuing Education System (LA CES): 7.25 hours
  • NY Landscape Architects: 10.5 hours CL; 10 hours EA
  • NJ Public Health Continuing Education Contact Hours: 7.5
  • NJ Licensed Water & Wastewater Operators: 7 TCHs
  • NJ Certified Public Works Managers (CPWM): 5 Technical, 2 Government
  • NJ Licensed Professional Engineers: 6 Continuing Professional Competency (CPC) credits
  • NY Professional Engineers: 7 hours
  • NJ Licensed Site Remediation Professionals (LSRP): 6.5 Technical CEC’s

The course will be held on Wednesday, June 5 2019 from 8:30AM to 5:00PM at the Rutgers Continuing Education Center at the Atrium in Somerset, NJ. Register on or before May 22 to take advantage of a discounted early registration fee. Pre-registration is required. Continental breakfast and buffet lunch are provided at no additional cost.

Princeton Hydro is proud to partner with Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education and take part in this valuable continuing professional education course. We hope to see you there!

 

Recycled Christmas Trees Used to Restore Disappearing NJ Shoreline

INNOVATIVE COASTAL RESILIENCY DESIGN USING RECYCLED CHRISTMAS TREES IMPLEMENTED BY VOLUNTEERS ALONG DISAPPEARING POINT PLEASANT SHORELINE

To prevent further erosion at the Slade Dale Sanctuary in Point Pleasant, dozens of volunteers helped stabilize the shoreline using a technique that has never been done before in New Jersey.  On Saturday, American Littoral Society, in partnership with Princeton Hydro, Borough of Point Pleasant, New Jersey Nature Conservancy, New Jersey Corporate Wetlands Restoration Partnership, and the Point Pleasant Rotary Club, organized dozens of volunteers to restore the shoreline and prevent further erosion at the Slade Dale Sanctuary using recycled Christmas trees.

As one of only a few areas of open space left in Point Pleasant, the 13-acre Slade Dale Sanctuary is an important part of the local ecosystem, and is home to a number of unique animals and plants. This waterfront preserve along the North Branch Beaver Dam Creek is predominantly tidal marsh, which provides habitat for various birds, including osprey, as well as passive recreation opportunities for the community.

Unfortunately, the Slade Dale Sanctuary is disappearing. Since 1930, the shoreline of Slade Dale Sanctuary has retreated approximately 300 feet, equal to the length of a football field, and the channels into the marsh have increased in number and size, according to a study we conducted on behalf of American Littoral Society, for which we provide engineering and natural resources management consulting services.

In order to stabilize the shoreline, restore the marsh, and enhance the ecological function and integrity of the preserve, Princeton Hydro developed a conceptual and engineering design using living shoreline features to enhance ecological value and reduce erosion. The final conceptual plan for restoration uses tree vane structures to attenuate wave action, foster sediment accretion, and reduce erosion along the coast.

To implement this vision and begin building back marsh, the project team is constructing several Christmas tree breakwaters and Christmas tree vanes that mimic naturally occurring debris structures in tidal systems and enhance habitat opportunity and shelter for aquatic life. Volunteers came together on Saturday, May 11 to help with the construction. The Mayor of Point Pleasant Robert A. Sabosik also attended the event, “The Barnegat Bay is an attribute that we all enjoy, and it’s something we have to protect.”

After the 2018 holiday season, the Good Sheppard Lutheran Church in Point Pleasant provided space to collect and store donated Christmas trees, which were then moved to the marsh a few days before the event. On the day of the event, recycled Christmas trees were transported from their staged locations on the marsh to the breakwater sections that were previously installed in the water. To transport them across the water to the pilings, volunteers used two methods: by walking a skiff boat loaded with trees through the water to the pilings or by forming assembly line from the shore to pilings to guide floating trees through the water (check out the album below!).  Then, they stuffed the Christmas trees between the pilings, securely tied them down, and staked Christmas trees directly into the creek bottom. For extra assurance, the placed and tied heavy bags of used oyster shells on top of the tree line. Oyster shells were donated by local Monmouth County restaurants in an effort to reduce waste streams.

“We really enjoyed participating in this event with American Littoral Society and so many wonderful volunteers,” Christiana L. Pollack, GISP, CFM, Princeton Hydro’s Project Manager for this restoration effort. “It is so wonderful to see this project coming to fruition. We’re so proud of our partnership with American Littoral Society and our combined efforts to revitalize and rehabilitate our precious coastal habitats.”

Members of the media were invited to attend the volunteer event. News 12 New Jersey covered the event and aired a story on it during their Sunday news broadcast, and NJTV News will be airing the story in the near future.

Many thanks to everyone who came out in support of this important restoration effort at Slade Dale Sanctuary American Littoral Society hosts volunteer events throughout the year. Go here to get involved.

 

Capture the Change at Roebling Park

By Kelsey Mattison, Marketing Coordinator

Our wetland restoration project at Roebling Park just got even cooler! The Mercer County Park Commission (MCPC) is launching a citizen science/outreach campaign to help them document the visual changes seen in the park as the restoration progresses.

MCPC invites visitors to the park to help capture the change from various vantage points within the park. There are seven photo stations spread throughout the park’s trail. All are clearly marked with signage and directions on how to participate in the Capture the Change initiative.

Because the restoration heavily involves the removal of invasive Phragmites australis, most of the vantage points currently overlook dense swaths of “phrag” overgrowth in the marsh. Once the restoration is complete, that overgrowth will give way to native flora, increased biodiversity, enhanced tidal function, more incredible viewscapes, and so much more.

Here are some photos we captured at MCPC’s guided hike through the marshland, introducing the Capture the Change initiative. These photos were taken at each Capture the Change vantage point along the trail.

First Capture the Change vantage point

Second Capture the Change vantage point

Third Capture the Change vantage point

Fourth Capture the Change vantage point

Fifth Capture the Change vantage point

Sixth Capture the Change vantage point

Seventh Capture the Change vantage point

You can join the Capture the Change initiative too by posting a photo from one of these vantage points and adding the hashtag #BagthePhrag. We can’t wait to watch this marshland transform!

For more details on this restoration project, check out this blog:

Restoring the Northernmost Freshwater Tidal Marsh on the Delaware River

Kelsey Mattison is Princeton Hydro’s Marketing Coordinator and a recent graduate of St. Lawrence University with a degree in English and environmental studies and a passion for environmental communication. Through her extracurricular work with various nonprofit organizations, she has developed expertise in social media management, content writing, storytelling, and interdisciplinary thinking. In her free time, Kelsey enjoys dancing of all sorts, going on long walks with her camera, and spending time with friends and family in nature.