Recycled Christmas Trees Used to Restore Disappearing NJ Shoreline

INNOVATIVE COASTAL RESILIENCY DESIGN USING RECYCLED CHRISTMAS TREES IMPLEMENTED BY VOLUNTEERS ALONG DISAPPEARING POINT PLEASANT SHORELINE

To prevent further erosion at the Slade Dale Sanctuary in Point Pleasant, dozens of volunteers helped stabilize the shoreline using a technique that has never been done before in New Jersey.  On Saturday, American Littoral Society, in partnership with Princeton Hydro, Borough of Point Pleasant, New Jersey Nature Conservancy, New Jersey Corporate Wetlands Restoration Partnership, and the Point Pleasant Rotary Club, organized dozens of volunteers to restore the shoreline and prevent further erosion at the Slade Dale Sanctuary using recycled Christmas trees.

As one of only a few areas of open space left in Point Pleasant, the 13-acre Slade Dale Sanctuary is an important part of the local ecosystem, and is home to a number of unique animals and plants. This waterfront preserve along the North Branch Beaver Dam Creek is predominantly tidal marsh, which provides habitat for various birds, including osprey, as well as passive recreation opportunities for the community.

Unfortunately, the Slade Dale Sanctuary is disappearing. Since 1930, the shoreline of Slade Dale Sanctuary has retreated approximately 300 feet, equal to the length of a football field, and the channels into the marsh have increased in number and size, according to a study we conducted on behalf of American Littoral Society, for which we provide engineering and natural resources management consulting services.

In order to stabilize the shoreline, restore the marsh, and enhance the ecological function and integrity of the preserve, Princeton Hydro developed a conceptual and engineering design using living shoreline features to enhance ecological value and reduce erosion. The final conceptual plan for restoration uses tree vane structures to attenuate wave action, foster sediment accretion, and reduce erosion along the coast.

To implement this vision and begin building back marsh, the project team is constructing several Christmas tree breakwaters and Christmas tree vanes that mimic naturally occurring debris structures in tidal systems and enhance habitat opportunity and shelter for aquatic life. Volunteers came together on Saturday, May 11 to help with the construction. The Mayor of Point Pleasant Robert A. Sabosik also attended the event, “The Barnegat Bay is an attribute that we all enjoy, and it’s something we have to protect.”

After the 2018 holiday season, the Good Sheppard Lutheran Church in Point Pleasant provided space to collect and store donated Christmas trees, which were then moved to the marsh a few days before the event. On the day of the event, recycled Christmas trees were transported from their staged locations on the marsh to the breakwater sections that were previously installed in the water. To transport them across the water to the pilings, volunteers used two methods: by walking a skiff boat loaded with trees through the water to the pilings or by forming assembly line from the shore to pilings to guide floating trees through the water (check out the album below!).  Then, they stuffed the Christmas trees between the pilings, securely tied them down, and staked Christmas trees directly into the creek bottom. For extra assurance, the placed and tied heavy bags of used oyster shells on top of the tree line. Oyster shells were donated by local Monmouth County restaurants in an effort to reduce waste streams.

“We really enjoyed participating in this event with American Littoral Society and so many wonderful volunteers,” Christiana L. Pollack, GISP, CFM, Princeton Hydro’s Project Manager for this restoration effort. “It is so wonderful to see this project coming to fruition. We’re so proud of our partnership with American Littoral Society and our combined efforts to revitalize and rehabilitate our precious coastal habitats.”

Members of the media were invited to attend the volunteer event. News 12 New Jersey covered the event and aired a story on it during their Sunday news broadcast, and NJTV News will be airing the story in the near future.

Many thanks to everyone who came out in support of this important restoration effort at Slade Dale Sanctuary American Littoral Society hosts volunteer events throughout the year. Go here to get involved.

 

Study Data Leads to Healthier Wreck Pond Ecosystem

Wreck Pond is a tidal pond located on the coast of the Atlantic Ocean in southern Monmouth County, New Jersey. The 73-acre pond, which was originally connected to the sea by a small and shifting inlet, got its name in the 1800s due to the numerous shipwrecks that occurred at the mouth of the inlet. The Sea Girt Lighthouse was built to prevent such accidents. In the 1930s, the inlet was filled in and an outfall pipe was installed, thus creating Wreck Pond. The outfall pipe allowed limited tidal exchange between Wreck Pond and the Atlantic Ocean.

In the 1960s, Wreck Pond flourished with wildlife and was a popular destination for recreational activities with tourists coming to the area mainly from New York City and western New Jersey. In the early spring, hundreds of river herring would migrate into Wreck Pond, travelling up its tributaries — Wreck Pond Brook, Hurleys Pond Brook and Hannabrand Brook — to spawn. During the summer, the pond was bustling with recreational activities like swimming, fishing, and sailing.

Over time, however, the combination of restricted tidal flow and pollution, attributable to increased development of the watershed, led to a number of environmental issues within the watershed, including impaired water quality, reduced fish populations, and flooding.

Throughout the Wreck Pond watershed, high stream velocities during flood conditions have caused the destabilization and erosion of stream banks, which has resulted in the loss of riparian vegetation and filling of wetlands. Discharge from Wreck Pond during heavy rains conveys nonpoint source pollutants that negatively impact nearby Spring Lake and Sea Girt beaches resulting in beach closings due to elevated bacteria counts. Watershed erosion and sediment transported with stormwater runoff has also contributed to excessive amounts of sedimentation and accumulations of settled sediment, not only within Wreck Pond, but at the outfall pipe as well. This sediment further impeded tidal flushing and the passage of anadromous fish into and out of Wreck Pond.

In 2012, Hurricane Sandy caused wide-spread destruction throughout New Jersey and the entire eastern seaboard. The storm event also caused a major breach of the Wreck Pond watershed’s dune beach system and failure of the outfall pipe. The breach formed a natural inlet next to the outfall pipe, recreating the connection to the Atlantic Ocean that once existed. This was the first time the inlet had been open since the 1930s, and the reopening cast a new light on the benefits of additional flow between the pond and the ocean.

Hurricane Sandy sparked a renewed interest in reducing flooding impacts throughout the watershed, including efforts to restore the water quality and ecology of Wreck Pond. The breach caused by Hurricane Sandy was not stable, and the inlet began to rapidly close due to the deposition of beach sand and the discharge of sediment from Wreck Pond and its watershed.

Princeton Hydro and HDR generated the data used to support the goals of the feasibility study through a USACE-approved model of Wreck Pond that examined the dynamics of Wreck Pond along with the water bodies directly upland, the watershed, and the offshore waters in the immediate vicinity of the ocean outfall. The model was calibrated and verified using available “normalized” tide data. Neighboring Deal Lake, which is also tidally connected to the ocean by a similar outfall pipe, was used as the “reference” waterbody. The Wreck Pond System model evaluated the hydraulic characteristics of Wreck Pond with and without the modified outfall pipe, computed pollutant inputs from the surrounding watershed, and predicted Wreck Pond’s water quality and ecological response. The calibrated model was also used to investigate the effects and longevity of dredging and other waterway feature modifications.

As part of the study, Princeton Hydro and HDR completed hazardous, toxic, and radioactive waste (HTRW) and geotechnical investigations of Wreck Pond’s sediment to assess potential flood damage reduction and ecological restoration efforts of the waterbody. The investigation included the progression of 10 sediment borings conducted within the main body of Wreck Pond, as well as primary tributaries to the pond. The borings, conducted under the supervision of our geotechnical staff, were progressed through the surgical accumulated sediment, not the underlying parent material. Samples were collected for analysis by Princeton Hydro’s AMRL-accredited (AASHTO Materials Reference Library) and USACE-certified laboratory. In accordance with NJDEP requirements, sediment samples were also forwarded to a subcontracted analytical laboratory for analysis of potential nonpoint source pollutants.

In the geotechnical laboratory, the samples were subjected to geotechnical indexing tests, including grain size, organic content, moisture content, and plasticity/liquid limits. For soil strength parameters, the in-field Standard Penetration Test (SPT), as well as laboratory unconfined compression tests, were performed on a clay sample to provide parameters for slope stability modeling.

The culvert construction and sediment dredging were completed at the end of 2016. Continued restoration efforts, informed and directed by the data developed through Princeton Hydro’s feasibility study, are helping to reduce the risk of flooding to surrounding Wreck Pond communities, increase connectivity between the pond and ocean, and improve water quality. The overall result is a healthier, more diverse, and more resilient Wreck Pond ecosystem.

During the time of the progression of study by the USACE, the American Littoral Society and the towns of Spring Lake and Sea Girt were also progressing their own restoration effort and completed the implementation of an additional culvert to the Atlantic Ocean.  The American Littoral Society was able to utilize the data, analysis, and modeling results developed by the USACE to ensure the additional culvert would increase tidal flushing and look to future restoration projects within Wreck Pond.

American Littoral Society

 

To learn more about our geotechnical engineering services, click here.

Barnegat “Clean Water, Beautiful Bay” Project wins Governor’s Environmental Excellence Award

The American Littoral Society was awarded the Governor’s Environmental Excellence Award in the Water Resources category this year for their Clean Water, Beautiful Bay projects in Barnegat Bay.

According to the Barnegat Bay Partnership, over 33% of the Barnegat Bay watershed has been altered to urban land cover. The construction of communities, roads and business has greatly increased the total amount of impervious surfaces in the watershed. With the added impervious cover has come a steady increase in the amount of nutrients, sediment, pathogens and other contaminants transported into the Bay by runoff. This accelerated the degradation of the Bay’s water quality and triggered changes to the Bay’s ecology.

Recognizing the importance of the Barnegat Bay, the American Littoral Society proposed green infrastructure measures to decrease runoff volume and nutrient loading to the bay and its tributaries.  Princeton Hydro was contracted by American Littoral Society to design four projects and provide oversight on the construction of the bioretention basins, rain gardens, porous pavement, etc. The projects were funded by the largest 319 grant ever administered by the NJDEP, totaling around $1 million. The project aimed to:

  1. Improve the water quality of Barnegat Bay by reducing the influx of nitrogen and other pollutants originating from the Long Swamp Creek and Lower Toms River watersheds. And, therefore, improve the water quality of both Long Swamp Creek and Lower Toms River, thus moving them closer to removal from the NJDEP’s 303D list of impaired waters.
  2. Demonstrate that relatively low-cost, stormwater system retrofits are capable of decreasing runoff volume, increasing stormwater recharge, and removing nutrients, and can be effectively implemented in even highly developed watersheds.
  3. Educate the public, elected and appointed officials and public work personnel of the types and benefits of bioretention, biodetention and infiltration stormwater management techniques.

From our team, Dr. Steve Souza and Paul Cooper worked to develop a unique Scoring Matrix for the selection of best management practices for retrofit projects. They have been asked several times to present on the matrix and demonstrate how to beneficially utilize it. In addition to design, Princeton Hydro participated in much of the public outreach for these projects, including giving presentations, leading workshops, and helping high school students plant vegetation around their school.

RWJ Barnabas Community Medical Center Educational Sign

According to NJDEP, the Clean Water, Beautiful Bay projects were successful in reducing flooding in a private residential homeowner community, improving a stormwater basin and public open space area at a hospital, introducing golf course staff and golfers to environmentally friendly golf course management practices, and engaging high school students in planting projects on school property.  The projects demonstrated that green infrastructure construction projects can reduce flooding and water pollution at business, community, school and public recreation locations, and can be publicly accepted and valued for the environmentally protective and restorative benefits they provide to Barnegat Bay.

Last year, the American Littoral Society’s Barnegat Bay Green Infrastructure Project was named “Project of the Year” by The American Society of Civil Engineers Central Jersey Branch.

For more information on Princeton Hydro’s green infrastructure and stormwater management services, please visit: bit.ly/stormwatermgmt 

Employee Spotlight: Meet Our New Team Members

We’re excited to welcome two new staff members and seven new part-time staff & interns to our team who are spread throughout our Ringoes, Sicklerville, and Glastonbury offices.

 

Full-Time Staff Members:
Kelsey Mattison, Marketing Coordinator

Kelsey is a recent graduate of St. Lawrence University with a degree in English and environmental studies and a passion for environmental communication. Through her extracurricular work with various nonprofit organizations, she has developed expertise in social media management, content writing, storytelling, and interdisciplinary thinking. Kelsey believes that effective communication needs to be multi-faceted, which is reflected in the diversity of her experience. She served as Photography Editor of St. Lawrence University’s newspaper, worked in digital media for the environmental outreach program of St. Lawrence University,  produced stories for Northern New York’s public radio station, and developed feature content for St. Lawrence County’s Chamber of Commerce. As a member of the Princeton Hydro team, she aims to further its mission by taking creative approaches to communicating about our shared home: Planet Earth. In her free time, Kelsey enjoys dancing of all sorts, going on long walks with her camera, and spending time with friends and family in nature.

Christine Worthington, Accounting Assistant

Christine is a detailed-oriented Accounting Assistant who has over 15 years of experience working in office administration for local businesses. She loves vacationing in Jamaica with her husband and spending time with her two sons & three grandchildren. In her free time, she listens to country music and visits new cities like Nashville.

 

Part-time Staff, Field Assistants & Interns:
Heidi Golden, PhD, Aquatic Ecologist

Heidi is an aquatic ecologist and evolutionary biologist with a strong background in fish monitoring, aquatic habitat assessment, population and community ecology, and population genetics and genomics. She holds a PhD in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and a Master of Science in Forestry and Wildlife Biology. In addition to her ecology expertise, Heidi has experience in GIS analysis, R statistical programing, scientific writing, permitting, and a wide range of field and laboratory techniques. Prior to joining Princeton Hydro, Heidi worked as a postdoctoral researcher with The Woods Hole Research Center, The Marine Biological Laboratory, and The University of Connecticut, where she continues to serve as adjunct faculty to the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. She investigated ecological and evolutionary responses of fish populations to rapid environmental change. Her professional experience also includes coordinating field expeditions in remote locations of the Alaskan Arctic, tagging and tracking thousands of fish through remote PIT-tag antenna arrays, using environmental DNA to monitor fish presence and movement, and developing experiments to assess ecosystem responses to change. She enjoys raising ducks, swimming in cold rivers, hiking, kayaking, camping, and family.

Andrew Greenlaw, Water Resources Intern

Andrew Greenlaw is in his fourth year at the University of Connecticut, majoring in Civil Engineering with a minor in Environmental Engineering. Before studying engineering he taught at a Marine science summer camp in Groton, CT, off of the Long Island Sound. He joined Princeton Hydro with the hope of combining his biological sciences experience with his academic engineering knowledge. He enjoys hiking, fishing, and just about any outdoor sport.

Ryan Lindsay, Water Resources Intern

Ryan is a double major at Rowan University focusing in both Civil & Environmental Engineering and Computer Science, and is currently finishing his final semester. He’s worked on various engineering clinic projects ranging from developing a pavement analysis program for Rhode Island DOT to a feasibility study to assist those with disabilities. His current project is to develop a home security/monitoring system with an accompanying mobile application. In the future, Ryan hopes to develop civil engineering applications for use by design engineers, and hopes that with his unique skillset he can make future engineers’ jobs easier and more efficient. Ryan enjoys playing baseball, listening to music, hiking and hanging out with friends and family.

Nick Niezgoda, Aquatics Field Assistant

Nick graduated in 2017 from Western State Colorado University with a B.S. in Biology. He lived and worked at Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory studying defense genotypes of B.stricta under Duke University’s Tom Mitchell-Olds Lab in 2016 and 2018. At RMBL, He also assisted in trapping and banding of Mountain White-Crowned Sparrows. He enjoys cycling, hiking, and birding!

Emily McGuckin, Aquatics Field Assistant

Emily is a recent graduate from Stockton University, with a BS in marine biology, and a minor in environmental science. She just finished up an internship with the American Littoral Society at Sandy Hook, where she helped manage the fish tagging program and educating others on the importance of maintaining an accurate fisheries database. She has experience in both freshwater and marine ecosystem management and is excited to continue learning about ecological restoration and management.  She is very interested in ecosystem resilience, specifically climate change and how it affects estuaries and estuarine organisms. Emily is hoping to attend graduate school in the near future to further her studies in marine science.

Pat Rose, Aquatics Field Assistant

Pat got interested in aquatics during a summer course studying at Lake Atitlán, Guatemala as an undergraduate at SUNY Oneonta. After graduation, he spent a year volunteering with AmeriCorps in Knoxville, TN as part of a Water Quality Team. While in Tennessee, he spent the majority of his time educating high school students on how to protect and improve local waterways and watersheds as part of the Adopt-A-Watershed program. The year, through AmeriCorps, he also worked with government organizations performing biological sampling and erosion monitoring in local streams. Pat is set to graduate from SUNY Oneonta with a M.S. in Lake Management in December. He created an interim lake management plan for a small reservoir in New York that has had cyanobacterial blooms over the past few years. Pat spent this past summer completing a co-op with an aquatic plant management company in the Pacific Northwest, working primarily with invasive Eurasian and hybrid watermilfoil populations.

 

American Littoral Society and Princeton Hydro Receive “Project of the Year” Award

The American Littoral Society and Princeton Hydro accepted the “Project of the Year” Award at last night's The American Society of Civil Engineers Central New Jersey Branch Annual Dinner. The team received the award for their work on the Barnegat Bay Green Infrastructure Project. Photo from left to right: Tim Dillingham, American Littoral Society Executive Director; Helen Henderson American Littoral Society Ocean Planning Manager for the Mid-Atlantic region; Dr. Stephen J. Souza, Princeton Hydro Founder.

The American Littoral Society and Princeton Hydro accepted the “Project of the Year” Award at the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Annual Dinner. The team received the award for their work on the Barnegat Bay Green Infrastructure Project.

”This was a terrific project conducted for a terrific client – the American Littoral Society,” said Princeton Hydro Founder Dr. Stephen Souza. “It also would not have been possible without a very supportive and engaged stakeholder group.”

The Barnegat Bay Project focused on reducing the amount of pollution entering the Bay’s waterways by retrofitting outdated stormwater management systems and implementing green infrastructure on previously developed sites.

“The project showcases the combined skill-sets of Princeton Hydro,” said Dr. Souza. “This was a truly collaborative effort involving the company’s aquatic ecologists, wetland ecologists, water resource engineers and landscape architect. We all worked closely to develop and implement green infrastructure solutions that measurably decrease pollutant loading to Barnegat Bay and correct localized flooding problems.”

Learn more about the award-winning project here: https://goo.gl/uQ3DfV. Big congratulations to the entire Littoral Society team for winning this prestigious award! And, many thanks to ASCE Central Jersey Branch for the recognition.

Barnegat Bay Green Infrastructure Project Named “Project of the Year”

Princeton Hydro is thrilled to announce that American Littoral Society’s Barnegat Bay Green Infrastructure Project has been named “Project of the Year” by The American Society of Civil Engineers Central Jersey Branch.

The award-winning project was a collaboration between the Littoral Society, Princeton Hydro and key partners that involved implementing a variety of green infrastructure stormwater management projects in order to decrease the volume of runoff and associated pollutants flowing into and damaging Barnegat Bay.

The green infrastructure projects were designed to treat stormwater at its source while delivering environmental, social and economic benefits to the Bay. Completed projects include:

  • Conversion of standard, grassed detention basins into naturalized bio-retention basins, as exemplified by the Laurel Commons Carnation Circle Basin, which now serves as a paradigm for the cost-effective retrofitting of aged, traditional detention basins
  • At Toms River High School North, the installation of tree boxes,
  • At the Toms River Board of Education offices, the replacement of conventional paving with permeable pavement,
  • At multiple sites, the construction of rain gardens,
  • At Toms River High School North, the construction/installation of stormwater management Manufactured Treatment Devices (MTDs)
  • At the Toms River Community Medical Center (RWJ Barnabas Health), the construction of a bio-retention/infiltration basin

The entire Princeton Hydro team extends our warmest congratulations to Helen Henderson and all of the folks at American Littoral Society for winning this prestigious award! Princeton Hydro is proud to partner with this incredible organization and is grateful for the work they do to protect our beautiful coastline and save the bay!

The Awards Dinner and celebration takes place on Tuesday, October 17th at the Forsgate Country Club. The “Project of the Year” nomination was originally submitted by Princeton Hydro founder Dr. Stephen Souza on behalf of the Littoral Society.

For a more detailed summary and photos of the award-winning project, click here.

Green Infrastructure Planting Projects

The Princeton Hydro team has been busy this summer installing over 1700 plants at three of the company’s green infrastructure stormwater management project sites.

First, team members finalized the planting of two rain gardens located at Clawson Park in East Amwell, NJ. They also installed plants in a renovated detention basin located at the West Amwell Municipal Building. Finally, together with members of the American Littoral Society team, the team finalized the planting of an expanded rain garden and a newly constructed bio-infiltration planter box at Toms River High School North, Toms River, NJ. All three projects are 319(h) funded projects.

Everyone dug-in, got their hands dirty and the payoff to all of this planting is less runoff and less pollutant loading to our streams and rivers!

Read more about Princeton Hydro’s green infrastructure projects here.

Stormwater Projects in Action

Improving Barnegat Bay through Green Infrastructure and Stormwater Management

FREE BROCHURE DOWNLOAD

American Littoral Society, Ocean County Soil Conservation District and Princeton Hydro recently held a Stormwater Projects in Action workshop. The workshop focused on a number of 319(h) funded projects designed by Princeton Hydro and implemented by American Littoral Society in the Long Swamp Creek/Lower Toms River sub-watersheds of Barnegat Bay. Those projects exemplified how green infrastructure techniques could be used to retrofit, upgrade and compliment standard stormwater management methods. This included the restoration of healthy soils and the construction/installation of bioretention basins, rain gardens, porous pavement, and sub-surface Manufactured Treatment Devices (MTDs).

Event participants learned about the problems affecting Barnegat Bay due to over-development and improper stormwater management. They were presented with examples of the types of green infrastructure solutions that can be implemented in any setting in order to achieve cleaner water and less flooding.

A brochure detailing each of the projects and providing an in-depth look at the incredible work being done to save Barnegat Bay was distributed to event attendees. You can download your free copy here:

screen-shot-2016-10-05-at-8-58-55-am

Princeton Hydro President Dr. Stephen Souza gave two presentations at the event. The first presentation explored the Matrix Scoring Tool that Princeton Hydro’s Senior Environmental Scientist Paul Cooper along with Dr. Souza developed to quantitatively evaluate the relative benefit of conducting one stormwater project versus another in a particular area. The 2nd presentation provided an overview of the five stormwater improvement projects that Princeton Hydro conducted as part of the $1,000,000 319(h) grant secured for American Littoral Society. If you’re interested in receiving a copy of either presentation, submit a comment below or email us.

Clean water is fundamental to all life.

 

 

Princeton Hydro’s Conservation Spotlight: SAVING BARNEGAT BAY

AMERICAN LITTORAL SOCIETY: SAVING BARNEGAT BAY

This Conservation Spotlight explores and celebrates
the American Littoral Society’s efforts to save Barnegat Bay

Screen Shot 2016-08-22 at 12.18.53 PM

Barnegat Bay stretches 42-miles, primarily along the inner-coast of Ocean County, New Jersey. The “Bay” is nationally recognized as a unique estuarine ecosystem with a variety of different habitats that many species depend on for survival. Due to numerous factors, but especially the development of its watershed and resulting high levels of nitrogen loading from stormwater runoff, the Bay has suffered serious ecological decline.

In an effort to save the Bay, the American Littoral Society developed a multi-faceted Clean Water Project plan, which focuses heavily on one of the Bay’s key issues: eutrophication due to excessive nitrogen loading. In partnership with Princeton Hydro, the Ocean County Soil District and others, American Littoral Society began work to decrease the volume of stormwater runoff and associated pollutants flowing into and damaging the Bay.

Screen Shot 2016-08-22 at 11.58.17 AMIn 2013, American Littoral Society, with assistance provided by Princeton Hydro, successfully secured $1,000,000 in 319(h) implementation funding through the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. American Littoral Society then developed an innovative basin ranking matrix. The matrix, created by Princeton Hydro, provides a non-biased, quantitative means of identifying and ranking stormwater management projects having the greatest potential to decrease pollutant loading to the Bay.

With funding secured and a prioritization methodology in place, American Littoral Society then began its work to retrofit antiquated, inefficient stormwater basins throughout the Barnegat Bay watershed. The goal was to reduce runoff through upgraded stormwater management systems emphasizing the application of green infrastructure techniques.

American Littoral Society and Princeton Hydro along with key partners implemented a variety of green infrastructure projects to treat stormwater at its source while delivering environmental, social and economic benefits to Barnegat Bay. Completed projects include:

  • 2 Years After Planting was Completed: Laurel Commons, Carnation Basin RetrofitConversion of standard, grassed detention basins into naturalized bio-retention basins, as exemplified by the Laurel Commons Carnation Circle Basin, which now serves as a paradigm for the cost-effective retrofitting of aged, traditional detention basins
  • At Toms River High School North, the installation of tree boxes,
  • At the Toms River Board of Education offices, the replacement of conventional paving with permeable pavement,
  • At multiple sites, the construction of rain gardens,
  • At Toms River High School North, the construction/installation of stormwater management Manufactured Treatment Devices (MTDs)
  • At the Toms River Community Medical Center (RWJ Barnabas Health), the construction of a bio-retention/infiltration basin

Education and outreach have also been key factors in improving the condition of the Bay, including training seminars for engineers, planners and code officials on basin conversion and management of green infrastructure; educational materials and signage; and public involvement in volunteer clean-ups, lawn fertilizer usage reduction, and rain garden and basin planting.  

Through its work with key partners, like Princeton Hydro, and countless volunteers, the American Littoral Society has made notable progress in Barnegat Bay, but much more needs to be done to restore and protect this unique ecosystem. Join the cause to help save Barnegat Bay; contact the American Littoral Society to find out how you can make a difference. 

For a detailed review of each project and an in-depth look at the incredible work being done to save Barnegat Bay, go here and download our brochure.

About the American Littoral Society: The American Littoral Society, founded in 1961, promotes the study and conservation of marine life and habitat, protects the coast from harm, and empowers others to do the same.