Photo Contest! Show Your #LakesAppreciation on Instagram to Win $100

Did you know that lakes contain about 90% of all surface water on Earth, not counting the oceans? That’s a whole lot to appreciate! And, luckily Lakes Appreciation Month is right around the corner!

July 1 marks the beginning of Lakes Appreciation Month. To encourage active participation in this month-long celebration, we’re holding a #LakesAppreciation Instagram photo contest where you can show us how you appreciate lakes! The winner will receive a $100 Amazon gift card.

CONTEST DETAILS & GUIDELINES: 

We want to see how YOU appreciate lakes! Send us photos of yourself actively participating in lake appreciation. Make sure to read the contest guidelines and conditions listed below. Need some inspiration? Scroll down for a list of suggestions to get your creativity flowing.

HOW TO ENTER THE CONTEST:
  • During the month of July, get out on your local lakes and participate in an appreciation activity.
  • Snap a photo of yourself doing a lake appreciation activity and post it to Instagram. You must use this hashtag #LakesAppreciation in your caption and tag Princeton Hydro (@princeton_hydro) in the photo.
    • In order for us to view your entry and your photo to be eligible for the contest, your account or post must be public.
    • Entries must be submitted as regular posts on your profile in order to qualify, but we also encourage you to add the picture to your story!
PHOTO GUIDELINES:

Each Post Must Include the Following:

  • A lake photo
  • You actively participating in an appreciation activity
  • A caption explaining what you did and why you appreciate your lakes!
  • #LakesAppreciation
  • @princeton_hydro tagged

One lucky winner will be randomly selected on August 1, 2019. The selected winner will receive a $100 gift card to Amazon. We’ll reach out to you via social media to collect your email and address for prize distribution. If the winner does not respond within five working days with the appropriate information, we will select another winner at random. Good luck, everyone!

GETTING STARTED:

Not sure how to get started? We’ve got you covered with a few ideas! Here are 10 ways you can show your lake appreciation:

  1. Relax on the lake: Whether you enjoy swimming, relaxing on the shoreline, sailing, canoeing, or kayaking, there are countless ways you can get outside and enjoy your community lakes.
  2. Go fishing: There’s nothing quite like relaxing on the shoreline with a fishing pole in your hand. Whether you’re there to catch and release or want to take your catches home, fishing is a great way to unwind. Go get your license (if you’re above the age of 16), check your local fishing rules and regulations, and cast a line in your local lake!
  3. new jersey ospreyBreak out the binoculars:  Lakes are great spots to go birding! Download the eBird app to track your bird sightings and see what fellow birders have reported in the area. Also, keep your eyes peeled for ospreys; New Jersey has an osprey conservation project with a map to track all the recent sighting reports.
  4. #TrashTag – Clean it up: One super quick and easy thing to do is clean up your local lake. You can get a small group of friends together or just go out on your own – no effort is too small! You’ll be able to immediately see the benefits of your actions when the trash-lined shore is clear. In addition to the Lakes Appreciation Photo contest tags, make sure you use #trashtag, a global viral cleanup challenge that shows people’s before and after pictures of their cleaning efforts so that you can be a part of that growing trend!
  5. Get involved with your local lake: You can help support your favorite lake by joining a lake or watershed association. As an organized, collective group, lake associations work toward identifying and implementing strategies to protect water quality and ecological integrity. Lake associations monitor the condition of the lake, develop lake management plans, provide education about how to protect the lake, work with the government entities to improve fish habitat, and much more.
  6. Remove invasive species: One of the most harmful elements of lake ecosystems are invasive species. So, by properly removing and discarding them, you can really help a lake to achieve its most desired state. A list of possible invasive species can be found here. For inspiration, check out this blog, written by our Senior Limnologist, Mike Hartshorne.
  7. Call on your inner-artist and draw a lake scene: All you need is a notepad, a pencil, and some spare time to let your imagination and creative skills take over. Does your lake have ducks? Are there people swimming? Is the sun rising or setting? Snap a picture of you with your art!
  8. Monitor and report algae blooms: With the BloomWatch App, you can help the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency understand where and when potential harmful algae blooms (HABs) occur. HABs have the potential to produce toxins that can have serious negative impacts on the health of humans, pets, and our ecosystems. Learn more and download the app.
  9. Join the “Secchi Dip-In” contest: The “Secchi Dip-In” is an annual citizen science  event created by NALMS during which lake-goers and associations across North America use a simple Secchi disk to monitor the transparency or turbidity of their local waterway. Visit their website to find out how to join their contest!
  10. Create your own experience: Write a sonnet about one of your lake experiences. Snap a picture of you sitting out by the water’s edge. Share your favorite lake memory on social media. Collect shells. Play a round of SpikeBall or CanJam in the surrounding area. With permission from the lake owner, plant some native species around the water. The possibilities are endless for lake appreciation!

Still having trouble thinking of an activity to do? Visit the NALMS’s website!

fishing on lake

ADDITIONAL CONTEST CONDITIONS:

By submitting an entry (Photograph) via Instagram to Princeton Hydro’s 2019 #LakesAppreciation Month Contest, you agree to the following: You represent and warrant that:

  • You are the sole and exclusive author and owner of the Photograph submitted and all rights therein; and
  • You have the full and exclusive right, power, and authority to submit the Photograph; and
  • You irrevocably grant Princeton Hydro a non-exclusive, worldwide, royalty-free, perpetual license to use the Photograph in any manner related to the Contest, including all associated use, reproduction, distribution, sublicense, derivative works, and commercial and non-commercial exploitation rights in any and all media now known or hereafter invented, including, but not limited to public relations purposes, posting on social media accounts, and/or for company marketing materials; and
  • No rights in the Photograph have been previously granted to any person, firm, corporation or other entity, or otherwise encumbered such that the prior grant would limit or interfere with the rights granted to Princeton Hydro herein; and
  • No part of your Photograph defames or invades the privacy or publicity rights of any person, living or decreased, or otherwise infringes upon any third party’s copyright, trademark or other personal or property rights.

Check out the details and winner of last year’s Lakes Appreciation Month contest:

WINNER! #LakesAppreciation Month Contest Results

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Protecting Greenwood Lake’s Water Quality Through Stormwater Management

The summer is upon us and Lakes Appreciation Month is right around the corner, what better time to pay a visit to and learn more about the lakes in your area.

Princeton Hydro conducts work on lakes throughout the Northeast to preserve, protect and improve water quality and ecological health, ensuring that your community lakes can be enjoyed now and into the future. Today, we’re putting the spotlight on Greenwood Lake:

Greenwood Lake, a 7-mile-long interstate lake that straddles the border of New York and New Jersey, is a popular recreation spot for residents and tourists of both states. Considered to be one of the top bass fishing lakes in New Jersey, Greenwood Lake is abundant with largemouth and smallmouth bass, yellow perch, chain pickerel and catfish. The lake is also extensively used by residents for swimming and boating.

For over 35 years, Princeton Hydro’s scientists have worked with New Jersey, local governing municipalities, and the various environmental organizations involved with the protection of Greenwood Lake and its watershed. In the early 2000s, we developed a comprehensive Restoration Plan and a proactive monitoring program that we have used over the years to properly manage the lake and its watershed. The plan was developed for the Greenwood Lake Commission and the Township of West Milford with funding provided through the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection’s Nonpoint Source 319(h) Program. The Restoration Plan focuses heavily on the implementation of various types of stormwater best management practices (BMPs) to help reduce the influx of sediment and nutrients into the lake. We track the positive effects and benefits achieved through these stormwater projects by conducting both storm-event based and in-lake water quality monitoring.

The goal of the stormwater-based efforts is to ensure the lake’s total phosphorus (TP) load is systematically reduced in accordance with the lake’s established Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL). The TMDL is a regulatory term in the U.S. Clean Water Act, that identifies the maximum amount of a pollutant (in this case phosphorus) that a waterbody can receive while still meeting water quality standards. Princeton Hydro was instrumental in developing the TMDL for Greenwood Lake. Phosphorus entering the lake from runoff is the primary driver of the lake’s eutrophication. The direct results of eutrophication are increases in the density of aquatic plants and nuisance algae. All this added productivity leads to reduced clarity, reductions in dissolved oxygen concentrations, and a number of other ecological impacts that compromise the quality, aesthetics, and use of the lake.

Last year, Princeton Hydro and the Greenwood Lake Commission, with input from the West Milford Environmental Commission, proposed an updated Watershed Implementation Plan (WIP) for the lake. Approved and funded by the NJ Highlands Council, the updated WIP includes a variety of components that build upon the original Restoration Plan and incorporate newly advanced stormwater management and Nonpoint Source Pollution (NPS) reduction technologies.

Belcher's Creek at Edgecumb and Glencross

The WIP includes in‐lake and stream monitoring; the assessment of the existing stormwater structures installed through grant‐based, watershed activities; and the identification of watershed-based projects that can be completed to support the Lake’s compliance with TMDL TP levels with a specific focus on the stormwater runoff produced by Belcher’s Creek, a major tributary to Greenwood Lake.

The WIP also includes the following nine minimum elements considered necessary by both NJDEP and USEPA for funding eligibility:

  1. Identify causes and sources of pollution
  2. Estimate pollutant loading into the watershed and the expected load reductions
  3. Describe management measures that will achieve load reductions and targeted critical areas
  4. Estimate amounts of technical and financial assistance and the relevant authorities needed to implement the plan
  5. Develop an information/education component
  6. Develop a project schedule
  7. Describe the interim, measurable milestones
  8. Identify indicators to measure progress
  9. Develop a monitoring component

While many of these elements have been indirectly addressed to varying degrees in the original Restoration Plan, in order to maximize Greenwood Lake’s opportunities to obtain State and Federal funding for the design and implementation of watershed control measures, the WIP now explicitly correlates the nine elements to eight specific deliverables, which are as follows:

  1. Conduct a detailed in‐lake and watershed‐based water quality monitoring program and compare the data to that collected in 2004 and 2005 to document changes or shifts in water quality.
  2. Meet with the Township of West Milford, Passaic County and other stakeholders to
    inventory recently completed BMPs and other watershed management measures.
  3. Conduct a field‐based evaluation of the stormwater project completed since the original 319‐grant funded Restoration Plan.
  4. Conduct site assessments to identify other potential stormwater/watershed BMP projects.
  5. Conduct a field assessment of the Belchers Creek Corridor to identify potential Nonpoint Source Pollution Reduction Projects.
  6. Assemble the WIP with all the 9 elements fully satisfied.
  7. Schedule and implement stakeholder and public meetings to evaluate project status.
  8. Submit of final version of WIP to the NJDEP and present the findings and recommendations to the public.

This project was initiated in September 2018 and is projected for completion by September 2019. The Greenwood Lake Commission, serves as the inter‐State steward of the Greenwood Lake watershed, and is working closely with Princeton Hydro and the watershed stakeholders (Township of West Milford, Passaic County and others), to ensure the WIP is a holistic document.

Stay tuned for more Greenwood Lake updates as the WIP progresses. For more information about Princeton Hydro’s lake management projects and capabilities, or to discuss your project needs and goals, please contact us.

Some of the photos utilized in this blog are from The Village of Greenwood Lake.

6 Tips To Prepare Your Pond For Spring

It’s officially time to say goodbye to winter and “spring” your pond out of hibernation mode. We’ve put together six tips for getting your pond ready for Spring and ensuring it remains healthy all year long.

1. SPRING CLEANING 

The first step in preparing your pond for Spring is to give it a thorough cleaning. Remove leaves, debris, and any surface algae that may have accumulated over the winter. For shallow ponds, you may be able to use a net or pond rake to remove debris and sediment from the bottom and along the perimeter of the pond.

2. INSPECT YOUR POND FOR DAMAGE

Inspect your pond, including berms, outlet structures, and trash racks for any damage that may have occurred over winter due to ice. If you observe any damage, we recommend contacting a professional right away. One of our engineers or certified pond managers can determine if the damage is superficial or requires more significant repairs. Also, if your pond is equipped with an aeration system, before starting it up, be sure to schedule a system inspection. A thorough inspection and proper start-up procedure will ensure the system remains fully and effectively operational for the entire summer.

3. PUT YOUR POND TO THE TEST

The routine testing of your pond’s water quality is an important part of preventing harmful algae growth, fish kills, and other problems. We recommend conducting a “Spring start up” water quality analysis of your pond. The resulting data will inform the management process and allow for the development of a pro-active, eco-friendly management plan. Maintaining your pond’s water quality helps to control nuisance aquatic species and promote environmental conditions supportive of a healthy and productive fishery.

4. AQUASCAPE YOUR SHORELINE

It’s important to check the pond’s shoreline for any signs of erosion. Mowing to the water line, especially in ponds that have fluctuating water levels, can lead to severe shoreline erosion. Eroding shorelines can be easily stabilized by planting native, riparian plants.

Deep-rooted, native emergent aquatic vegetation is able to tolerate alternating periods of exposure and dry inundation. The correct combination of native aquatic plants, emergent wetland plants, and transitional upland plants can correct or prevent chronic shoreline erosion problems. A properly planted (aquascaped) edge beautifies the shoreline, stabilizes erosion problems, creates fish and amphibian habitat, attracts pollinating species and a variety of birds, and decreases mosquito breeding.

5. CONSIDER INSTALLING AN AERATION SYSTEM

Sub-surface aeration systems eliminate stagnant water and keep your pond thoroughly mixed and properly circulated. These systems are the most cost-effective and energy-efficient way to maintain proper pond circulation. Proper aeration enhances fish habitat, minimizes the occurrence of algae blooms, and prevents mosquito breeding. It’s best to contact a certified lake/pond manager to first determine if aeration is the right solution for you. If it is, an aeration system tailored to your pond’s needs can be designed and installed.

6. HAVE AN ECOLOGICALLY BALANCED POND MANAGEMENT PLAN

There is more to pond management than weed and algae treatments alone. There is also a big difference between simple pond maintenance and ecologically-based pond management. A customized pond management plan acts as a “blueprint” that guides  proactive, long-term care for your pond.

Our certified lake and pond managers can assess the status of your pond and provide you with an environmentally holistic management plan that is based on the unique physical, hydrologic, chemical, and biological attributes of your pond. A management plan identifies the causes of your pond’s problems and provides you with the guidance needed to correct these problems. The results are far more environmentally sustainable than simple (and often unnecessary) reactive weed and algae treatments.

 

To learn more about our lake and pond management services or schedule a consultation, visit: http://bit.ly/pondlake.

Employee Spotlight: Meet Our New Team Members

We’re excited to announce the expansion of our growing business with the addition of six team members who have experience and qualifications in a variety of fields related to water resource management.

Meet the new team members:

alexi sanchez de boado, DC Regional Office Manager and Senior Project Manager

As DC Regional Office Manager and Senior Project Manager, Alexi focuses on watershed management and green infrastructure. For almost two decades, he has managed watershed management projects in the DC metro area, and beyond, for federal, state, county and local governments and other government entities under the authority of the Clean Water Act, National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES), and related regulations.

Serving as an urban watershed manager and regulator for six years for the District of Columbia’s Watershed Protection Division, Nonpoint Source Management Branch, Alexi managed cross-jurisdictional, urban watershed rehabilitation projects, developed and coordinated the District’s Low Impact Development (LID) Initiatives Program, and oversaw complex stream and watershed assessment projects with a huge variety of stakeholders, from local NGOs to federal land holders. Since then, he has consulted as a scientist in both large and small consulting firms focusing on stormwater pollution, stream restoration, watershed planning, and green infrastructure.

Alexi holds a Master of Science in Environmental and Forest Biology from the State University of New York (SUNY) College of Environmental Science and Forestry (ESF) and a Master of Public Administration from the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Syracuse University.

In his spare time, Alexi enjoys attending concerts, biking, and traveling, especially through Latin America.

Amanda cote, regulatory specialist

Amanda graduated from Bridgewater State University in Massachusetts with a Bachelor of Science in Geography. She has background knowledge in GIS which lead her to work in college labs making maps and running various applications.  She has also participated in water resources projects and is eager to learn.

In her free time, she enjoys being in the great outdoors. Adventuring is a huge part of her life in any form that she can experience it: hiking, fishing, snowshoeing, swimming, backpacking, etc. But of all places to explore, Amanda’s favorite place to be is on top of a mountain, reflecting on and appreciating the journey she took to climb to its peak.

Matt PapPas, staff engineer

Matt is a newcomer to the engineering field, just graduating in the summer of 2018 with a Bachelor Degree in Civil Engineering and minor in Environmental Engineering from the University of Delaware. As an undergraduate, he was an active member of the UD ASCE chapter, where he was a leader in the organization and eventual captain of the concrete canoe team.

Prior to Princeton Hydro, he worked for a large construction firm in Delaware where he became quite familiar with the practical engineering world and was able to develop his working knowledge of constructability as well as hone his technical writing skills.

In his spare time, Matt enjoys cooking, hiking and wood carving.

Johnny quispe, Environmental Scientist

Johnny is a PhD candidate at Rutgers University’s Graduate Program of Ecology and Evolution investigating the effects of sea level rise on coastal ecosystems and communities. Through his research, he is identifying migration opportunity zones for marsh migration as well as areas for restoration and flood risk management. Johnny integrates social, economic, engineering, and natural systems into his projects to make coastal communities more resilient to natural disasters and climate change.

After Johnny earned his Bachelor of Science in Environmental Policy, Institutions, and Behaviors at Rutgers University, he focused on the conservation, restoration, and remediation of sites in NJ via a variety of roles in the nonprofit, public, and academic sectors. Johnny interned at the New Jersey Department of State and the Office of the Lieutenant Governor, New Jersey Future, Jersey Water Works, and at USEPA Region 2 Headquarters, where he conducted research for the Emergency and Remedial Response Division. In his spare time, he enjoys traveling, hiking, and playing board games.

Jake Schwartz, Project Engineer

Jake is a Project Engineer with a BS in Civil Engineering from Rowan University, which he earned in 2017. After graduating college, Jake worked for a civil and environmental consulting company, where he gained experience with stormwater design, flooding, grading, site layout, construction inspection/administration, and environmental regulation. Prior to his career in civil engineering, Jake worked his way up in the pool industry, starting as a swim instructor. He quickly moved up to a life guard position, and then eventually became responsible for managing 12 commercial swimming pools. As a pool manager, Jake was responsible for system upkeep and water chemistry in the swimming pools. This position enabled Jake to acquire hands on experience with water chemistry and hydraulic principles. In this position, Jake also oversaw 40 staff members, leaving him with substantial leadership experience. Jake’s goal is to use his knowledge and experience to design sustainable site plans for Princeton Hydro’s projects.

Outside of work, Jake enjoys hiking, swimming, going to the beach, and hanging out with friends.

RYAN WASIK, EIT, water resource engineer

Ryan is a Water Resource Engineer with a B.S. in Civil Engineering and a minor in Environmental Engineering from Widener University in in Chester, PA. After graduating, he worked as a highway inspector for roadway reconstruction and rehab projects in Delaware. Then, he worked as a project engineer designing and drafting for a wide range of civil/site design projects throughout the Philadelphia region and New Jersey. He has experience in roadway design, ADA ramp design, site grading and layout, utility design, erosion and sediment control measures, and stormwater design/inspections.

In his free time, Ryan enjoys playing golf, disk golf, running, and playing bass guitar.

November Events Spotlight: Conferences Throughout the Country

Princeton Hydro is participating in a variety of conferences taking place throughout the country that address topics ranging from lake management to green infrastructure resiliency:

October 30 – November 2: North American Lake Management Society (NALMS) Conference

NALMS is hosting its 38th International Symposium in Cincinnati Ohio, titled “Now Trending: Innovations in Lake Management.” This year’s symposium includes a robust exhibit hall, a variety of field trips, and a wide array of presentations on topics ranging from the latest in monitoring technologies to combating invasive species to nutrient and water quality management and more. Princeton Hydro’s Dr. Fred Lubnow, Director of Aquatic Programs, and Dr. Stephen Souza, Founder, both of whom have been members of NALMS since its inception, are presenting and exhibiting during the conference.

LEARN MORE

 

October 31 – November 2: Society for American Military Engineers (SAME) Small Business Conference (SBC)

SAME gives leaders from the A/E/C, environmental, and facility management industries the opportunity to come together with federal agencies in order to showcase best practices and highlight future opportunities for small businesses to work in the federal market. Princeton Hydro is proud to be attending the 2018 SAME SBC Conference, which is being held in New Orleans and co-locating with the Department of Veteran’s Affairs’ National Veterans Small Business Engagement. The program consists of networking events, small business exhibits, a variety of speakers and much more.

LEARN MORE & REGISTER

 

November 2: The 2nd Annual New Jersey Watershed Conference

We are a proud sponsor of this year’s New Jersey Watershed Conference, which is an educational event that aims to advance knowledge and communications on issues related to water quality and quantity across the state. The agenda features a variety of presentations from local experts on watershed management, stormwater, green infrastructure, and the problems and solutions related to the health of our watersheds. Princeton Hydro is exhibiting & our Marketing Coordinator, Kelsey Mattison, is leading a workshop on “How Social Media can be a Champion for your Watershed.”

LEARN MORE & REGISTER

 

November 4 – 8: 2018 American Water Resources Association Conference

The AWRA’s 53rd Annual Water Resources Conference is being held in Baltimore, MD. Community, conversations and connections are highlights of every AWRA conference and the 2018 conference will provide plenty of opportunities for all three, including an exhibitor hall, networking events, and variety of presentations and technical sessions. Princeton Hydro’s Christiana Pollack, GISP, CFM is giving a presentation on flood assessment and mitigation. 

LEARN MORE & REGISTER

 

November 8 – 10: Engineers Without Borders (EWB) USA Conference

The EWB, a nonprofit humanitarian organization that partners with developing communities worldwide in order to improve their quality of life, is hosting its USA National Conference in San Francisco.  The ​annual ​conference ​will ​address ​the ​theme ​“Engineers Unlock Potential.” ​Experts, ​practitioners, ​decision-makers, ​young ​professionals ​and ​students ​from ​a ​range ​of ​sectors ​will come together to network, exchange ideas, foster new thinking and develop solutions to the world’s most pressing infrastructure ​challenges. Princeton Hydro Staff Engineer Natalie Rodrigues, EIT, CPESC-IT, a EWB member, is attending the conference and presentation. Her session, titled “So You Think You Might Like to be an EWB Regional Officer or State Representative, ” is designed for those interested in taking the next step beyond Chapter or Project participation at EWB-USA, as well as for current Regional Steering Committee members who want to “amp up” their game.

LEARN MORE & REGISTER

 

November 13: Society for American Military Engineers (SAME) Philadelphia Resiliency Symposium

SAME Philadelphia is hosting an all day symposium featuring experts on infrastructure resiliency in the face of extreme storms, flooding and other natural disasters. Presentation topics include, Flood Hazard Risk and Climate Change Effects for Bulk Oil Storage Facilities; Post-Storm Infrastructure Improvements and Stream Restoration; and Resilience Risk Analysis and Engineering. Princeton Hydro President Geoffrey Goll, P.E. is giving a presentation titled, “Enhancing Coastal Habitat & Increasing Resiliency through Beneficial Reuse of Dredged Material in New Jersey.” We hope to see you there!

LEARN MORE & REGISTER

 

November 16: NJ Chapter American Water Resources Association (NJ-AWRA) Future Risk Symposium

As the frequency and intensity of storm events changes, how should watershed managers, engineers, and planners make informed decisions for the future? NJ-AWRA’s 2018 Future Risk Symposium, held at Duke Farms in Hillsborough, NJ, will focus on Future Flooding in Riverine Systems with presentations on climate trends, modeling, and planning that can be used in NJ to prepare for future flood events in New Jersey’s riverine systems. Princeton Hydro’s Christiana Pollack, GISP, CFM is giving a presentation on flood assessment, and the concepts and methods used to estimate flood risk for existing conditions and the year 2050.

LEARN MORE & REGISTER

 

STAY TUNED FOR MORE EVENT SPOTLIGHTS!

Efforts to Manage Hydrilla in Harveys Lake Prove Difficult but Effective

Collaboration between state agencies and local organizations in Luzerne County bring in grant money to determine Hydrilla infestation levels in Harveys Lake. Treatment efforts are scheduled for 2019.

Story provided by Princeton Hydro Senior Limnologist Michael Hartshorne, and originally published in the Pennsylvania iMapInvasives Fall 2018 Newsletter

Hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata)

Hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata) is a relatively new invasive plant in Pennsylvania with the first documented occurrence in 1989 in Adams County. Still, it was not until recently that lake managers, park rangers, and others in the natural resource field have turned their attention to this aggressive invader. Looking incredibly similar to our native waterweed (Elodea canadensis), hydrilla differs in that it is comprised of 4-8 whorled, toothed leaves in contrast to the smooth edged, 3-leaved whorl of E. canadensis.

 

Harveys Lake, located in the Borough of Harveys Lake (Luzerne County) is a large, deep glacial lake with limited littoral (i.e., shoreline) habitat. A significant body of work has been conducted at the lake with the original Phase I: Diagnostic-Feasibility Lake study conducted in 1992 and a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) issued for phosphorus in 2002.

From 2002 to present, Princeton Hydro has assisted the Borough in the restoration of the lake with a heavy focus on stormwater best management practices (BMPs) supplemented by routine, in-lake water quality monitoring. The goal of the storm water/watershed-based efforts was to reduce the lake’s existing, annual total Hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata) phosphorus load so it’s in full compliance with the established TMDL.

Mapped locations noted in 2014 and 2015 of hydrilla in Harveys Lake as documented in the Pennsylvania iMapInvasives database.

Over the last 15 years, the installation of these watershed-based projects has led to improved water quality conditions; specifically, phosphorus and algae concentrations have been reduced. While water quality conditions improved Harveys Lake, it was during one of the routine, summer water quality monitoring events conducted in July 2014 that a dense stand of hydrilla was noted at the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission’s public boat launch. More than likely, the plant entered the lake as a “hitchhiker” on the boat or trailer being launched from this public boat launch by someone visiting the lake.

Hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata) Credit: Nick Decker, DCNR Bureau of State Parks

Since the initial identification and confirmation of the hydrilla, the Borough of Harveys Lake has worked in conjunction with the Harveys Lake Environmental Advisory Council, the Luzerne County Conservation District, the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, and Princeton Hydro to secure funding for additional surveys to determine the spatial extent and density of growth followed by an aggressive eradication plan.

Grant funds already allocated to Harveys Lake under the state’s Non-Point Source Pollution Program were used to conduct a detailed boat-based and diving aquatic plant survey of Harveys Lake to delineate the distribution and relative abundance of the hydrilla in 2014. During these surveys, the distribution of the hydrilla was found to be limited to the northern portion of the lake with the heaviest densities just off the boat launch with plants observed growing in waters 20-25 feet deep.

A follow-up survey had shown hydrilla coverage to increase from 38% of surveyed sites to 58% of sites in 2016 with hydrilla now present at the lake’s outlet area. Spatial coverage of hydrilla increased from approximately 50 acres in 2014 to 210 acres in 2016, an increase of 160 acres.

This map shows the 2018 proposed treatment area of Harvey’s Lake. Due to funding issues, treatment is now scheduled for 2019. The current hydrilla distribution encompasses the entire littoral zone of Harvey’s Lake.

In hopes of preventing hydrilla escaping into the lake’s outlet stream, the Borough of Harveys Lake funded an emergency treatment of the two-acre outlet area in 2016 utilizing the systemic herbicide Sonar® (Fluridone). A follow-up treatment of 159 acres was conducted in 2017, again utilizing the Fluridone-based systemic herbicide.

The next treatment, which will attempt to cover the majority of the littoral habitat covered by hydrilla, is scheduled for late spring/early summer of 2019. It should be noted that Sonar® is being applied at a low concentration that is effective at eradicating the hydrilla, but will not negatively impact desirable native plant species.

The treatments conducted to date have documented some reductions in the vegetative coverage of hydrilla as well as tuber production relative to the original plant surveys conducted in 2016. However, it is recognized that it will take multiple years of treatment to eradicate this nuisance plant from the lake, as well as a highly proactive, interactive program to educate residents as well as visitors to the lake in preventing the re-introduction of this or other invasive species to Harveys Lake.

 

The successful, long-term improvement of a lake or pond requires a proactive management approach that addresses the beyond simply reacting to weed and algae growth and other symptoms of eutrophication. Our staff can design and implement holistic, ecologically-sound solutions for the most difficult weed and algae challenges. Visit our website to learn more about Princeton Hydro’s lake management services: http://bit.ly/pondlake

Michael Hartshorne‘s  primary areas of expertise include lake and stream diagnostic studies, TMDL development, watershed management, and small pond management and lake restoration. He is particularly skilled in all facets of water quality characterization, from field data collection to subsequent statistical analysis, modeling, technical reporting, and the selection and implementation of best management practices. He has extensive experience in utilizing water quality data in concert with statistical and modeling packages to support load reduction allocations for the achievement of water quality standards or tailored thresholds set forth to reduce the rate of cultural eutrophication. He also has significant experience in conducting detailed macrophyte, fishery, and benthic surveys.

Employee Spotlight: Meet Our New Team Members

We’re excited to welcome two new staff members and seven new part-time staff & interns to our team who are spread throughout our Ringoes, Sicklerville, and Glastonbury offices.

 

Full-Time Staff Members:
Kelsey Mattison, Marketing Coordinator

Kelsey is a recent graduate of St. Lawrence University with a degree in English and environmental studies and a passion for environmental communication. Through her extracurricular work with various nonprofit organizations, she has developed expertise in social media management, content writing, storytelling, and interdisciplinary thinking. Kelsey believes that effective communication needs to be multi-faceted, which is reflected in the diversity of her experience. She served as Photography Editor of St. Lawrence University’s newspaper, worked in digital media for the environmental outreach program of St. Lawrence University,  produced stories for Northern New York’s public radio station, and developed feature content for St. Lawrence County’s Chamber of Commerce. As a member of the Princeton Hydro team, she aims to further its mission by taking creative approaches to communicating about our shared home: Planet Earth. In her free time, Kelsey enjoys dancing of all sorts, going on long walks with her camera, and spending time with friends and family in nature.

Christine Worthington, Accounting Assistant

Christine is a detailed-oriented Accounting Assistant who has over 15 years of experience working in office administration for local businesses. She loves vacationing in Jamaica with her husband and spending time with her two sons & three grandchildren. In her free time, she listens to country music and visits new cities like Nashville.

 

Part-time Staff, Field Assistants & Interns:
Heidi Golden, PhD, Aquatic Ecologist

Heidi is an aquatic ecologist and evolutionary biologist with a strong background in fish monitoring, aquatic habitat assessment, population and community ecology, and population genetics and genomics. She holds a PhD in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and a Master of Science in Forestry and Wildlife Biology. In addition to her ecology expertise, Heidi has experience in GIS analysis, R statistical programing, scientific writing, permitting, and a wide range of field and laboratory techniques. Prior to joining Princeton Hydro, Heidi worked as a postdoctoral researcher with The Woods Hole Research Center, The Marine Biological Laboratory, and The University of Connecticut, where she continues to serve as adjunct faculty to the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. She investigated ecological and evolutionary responses of fish populations to rapid environmental change. Her professional experience also includes coordinating field expeditions in remote locations of the Alaskan Arctic, tagging and tracking thousands of fish through remote PIT-tag antenna arrays, using environmental DNA to monitor fish presence and movement, and developing experiments to assess ecosystem responses to change. She enjoys raising ducks, swimming in cold rivers, hiking, kayaking, camping, and family.

Andrew Greenlaw, Water Resources Intern

Andrew Greenlaw is in his fourth year at the University of Connecticut, majoring in Civil Engineering with a minor in Environmental Engineering. Before studying engineering he taught at a Marine science summer camp in Groton, CT, off of the Long Island Sound. He joined Princeton Hydro with the hope of combining his biological sciences experience with his academic engineering knowledge. He enjoys hiking, fishing, and just about any outdoor sport.

Ryan Lindsay, Water Resources Intern

Ryan is a double major at Rowan University focusing in both Civil & Environmental Engineering and Computer Science, and is currently finishing his final semester. He’s worked on various engineering clinic projects ranging from developing a pavement analysis program for Rhode Island DOT to a feasibility study to assist those with disabilities. His current project is to develop a home security/monitoring system with an accompanying mobile application. In the future, Ryan hopes to develop civil engineering applications for use by design engineers, and hopes that with his unique skillset he can make future engineers’ jobs easier and more efficient. Ryan enjoys playing baseball, listening to music, hiking and hanging out with friends and family.

Nick Niezgoda, Aquatics Field Assistant

Nick graduated in 2017 from Western State Colorado University with a B.S. in Biology. He lived and worked at Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory studying defense genotypes of B.stricta under Duke University’s Tom Mitchell-Olds Lab in 2016 and 2018. At RMBL, He also assisted in trapping and banding of Mountain White-Crowned Sparrows. He enjoys cycling, hiking, and birding!

Emily McGuckin, Aquatics Field Assistant

Emily is a recent graduate from Stockton University, with a BS in marine biology, and a minor in environmental science. She just finished up an internship with the American Littoral Society at Sandy Hook, where she helped manage the fish tagging program and educating others on the importance of maintaining an accurate fisheries database. She has experience in both freshwater and marine ecosystem management and is excited to continue learning about ecological restoration and management.  She is very interested in ecosystem resilience, specifically climate change and how it affects estuaries and estuarine organisms. Emily is hoping to attend graduate school in the near future to further her studies in marine science.

Pat Rose, Aquatics Field Assistant

Pat got interested in aquatics during a summer course studying at Lake Atitlán, Guatemala as an undergraduate at SUNY Oneonta. After graduation, he spent a year volunteering with AmeriCorps in Knoxville, TN as part of a Water Quality Team. While in Tennessee, he spent the majority of his time educating high school students on how to protect and improve local waterways and watersheds as part of the Adopt-A-Watershed program. The year, through AmeriCorps, he also worked with government organizations performing biological sampling and erosion monitoring in local streams. Pat is set to graduate from SUNY Oneonta with a M.S. in Lake Management in December. He created an interim lake management plan for a small reservoir in New York that has had cyanobacterial blooms over the past few years. Pat spent this past summer completing a co-op with an aquatic plant management company in the Pacific Northwest, working primarily with invasive Eurasian and hybrid watermilfoil populations.

 

October Events Spotlight: Conferences, Workshops & Galas

Throughout October, Princeton Hydro is proud to participate in a number of conferences and events on topics ranging from floodplain management to ecological restoration to dam removal:

October 10: Society for American Military Engineers (SAME) MEGA Maryland Small Business Conference

The conference, being held in Baltimore, gives small and minority businesses in the architecture, engineering and construction industries the opportunity to come together with federal agencies in order to showcase best practices and highlight future opportunities to work in the federal market. The program consists of networking events, a variety of speakers and small business exhibits. Be sure to stop by the Princeton Hydro booth to say hello to President Geoffrey Goll, P.E. and Communications Strategist Dana Patterson.

LEARN MORE & REGISTER

 

October 11: Great Swamp Gala & Silent Auction

The Great Swamp Watershed Association, a nonprofit organization dedicated to protecting and improving the water resources of the Passaic River region, is hosting its 2018 Gala & Silent Auction. This year’s event is being, held in honor of former New Jersey Governor Thomas Kean, for his environmental leadership during his administration for enacting landmark protections for New Jersey’s shoreline and freshwater wetlands. present and future generations. The evening will include a cocktail hour, dinner banquet, expansive silent auction, and remarks delivered by Governor Kean. Princeton Hydro is proud to be a Benefactor of the event and looking forward to attending.

LEARN MORE & REGISTER

 

October 11 – 13: Atlantic Estuarine Research Society (AERS) Fall Meeting

The theme of this year’s AERS Fall Meeting is “The power of framing your message: It’s not what you say, it’s how you say it!” Participants will gather at Stockton University to hear a variety of ignite-style presentations about misconceptions that typically surround scientific work, how to address them, and how to re-frame your message to be better understood by the general public and other non-scientists and increase stakeholder involvement. Princeton Hydro’s Senior Aquatics Scientist Jack Szczepanski, PhD will be attending the conference; chat with him to learn more about our pond and lake services.

LEARN MORE

 

October 11 – 13: Society for Ecological Restoration (SER) New England 2018 Regional Conference

This year’s SER New England conference brings together stewards, researchers, students, regulators, community activists and practitioners to explore innovative ecological restoration techniques and projects that connect communities within and across ecosystems. The conference includes a variety of plenary talks, field trips, workshops and a keynote address, which will be given by Stewart Diemont of SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry. The keynote, titled “Learning from the People and the Land: Traditional Ecological Knowledge Toward Restoration of Ecosystems and of our Connection with Nature,” is free and open to the public.

Members of the Princeton Hydro are attending the conference and leading two sessions: Laura Wildman, Water Resources and Fisheries Engineer, is leading a workshop about implementing dam removal to restore rivers. Paul Woodworth, Fluvial Geomorphologist, is presenting on the post-dam removal monitoring of active and passive restoration approaches utilizing the Hyde Pond Dam removal as a tangible example.

LEARN MORE & REGISTER

 

October 11: Hudson-Delaware Chapter of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (HDC-SETAC) 2018 Fall Workshop

HDC-SETAC is a professional society for scientists, engineers and related disciplines concerned with environmental science and health throughout the Hudson River and Delaware River metropolitan area. The 2018 Fall Workshop, being held at Villanova University, aims to enhance participants’ knowledge of “Harmful Algal Blooms and other Emerging Contaminants.” Princeton Hydro’s Director of Aquatic Programs Dr. Fred Lubnow is giving a presentation on “The Monitoring and Management of Cyanotoxins in Raw Water Supplies.” We hope to see you there! 

LEARN MORE

 

October 12: Association of New Jersey Environmental Commissions (ANJEC) 2018 Environmental Congress

ANJEC, a nonprofit organization supporting efforts to protect the environment and preserve natural resources in communities throughout New Jersey, is hosting its 45th Annual Environmental Congress at Mercer County College. The Environmental Congress is an annual statewide gathering of environmental commissions, local officials, agencies, citizen groups and environmental organizations, which includes an exhibitors hall, farmer’s market, and workshops on a variety of current environmental topics. Princeton Hydro, a business member of the ANJEC, will be exhibiting during the event. Stop by the booth to say hello to Dr. Stephen J. Souza, Princeton Hydro Founder and ANJEC Board of Trustees member, and Dana Patterson, Communications Strategist for Princeton Hydro.

LEARN MORE & REGISTER

 

October 23 – 25: New Jersey Association for Floodplain Management (NJAFM) 14th Annual Conference

NJAFM is hosting its 14th Annual Conference and Exhibition in Atlantic City, NJ. Participants will attend meetings and seminars covering topics, including hazard mitigation, flood insurance, infrastructure, mapping, planning, flood modeling, regulations, floodproofing, stormwater management, flood proofing, construction standards and more. Princeton Hydro’s Christiana Pollack, GISP, CFM and NJDEP’s Jessica Jahre, PP, AICP, CFM are giving a presentation, titled “A Flood Assessment for the Future,” for which they’ll showcase a flood assessment and flood mitigation analysis that Princeton Hydro performed in the Lower Moodna Creek Watershed.

LEARN MORE & REGISTER

 

October 23: “Undamming the Hudson River” Film Screening and Panel Event, Free & Open the Public

Riverkeeper and Patagonia present the premiere of “Undamming the Hudson River,” a short documentary film by National Geographic filmmaker Jon Bowermaster showcasing Riverkeeper’s efforts to restore natural habitat by eliminating obsolete dams throughout the Hudson River Estuary. The screening will be followed by refreshments and a panel discussion, moderated by Bowermaster, featuring experts in the field and an audience Q&A. Panelists, include:

  • Laura Wildman, PE – Water Resources and Fisheries Engineer, Princeton Hydro
  • George Jackman – Habitat Restoration Manager, Riverkeeper
  • Gwen McDonald – Director of Green Projects, Save the Sound
  • Andy J. Danylchuk, PhD – Associate Professor of Fish Conservation, UMASS Amherst, and Patagonia Fly Fishing Ambassador

This event is free and open to the public and will take place at Patagonia SoHo, 72 Greene St, New York, NY 10012 from 7:30 – 10pm.

RSVP HERE

 

October 24: Mid-Atlantic Chapter of the Urban & Regional Information Systems Association (MAC URISA) 2018 Conference

MAC URISA 2018, the largest GIS conference in the Mid-Atlantic region, will showcase outstanding and innovative uses of GIS technologies in the area. The program includes a variety of presentations, breakout sessions, a GIS Techspo forum, lightening talks, and more. Thomas Hopper, Princeton Hydro’s GIS Analyst, is providing a technical demonstration on the Linkage Mapper GIS Toolkit, which was created by the Nature Conservancy to support habitat connectivity analyses.

LEARN MORE & REGISTER HERE

 

October 30 – November 2: North American Lake Management Society (NALMS) Conference

NALMS is hosting its 38th International Symposium in Cincinnati Ohio, titled “Now Trending: Innovations in Lake Management.” This year’s symposium includes a robust exhibit hall, a variety of field trips, and a wide array of presentations on topics ranging from the latest in monitoring technologies to combating invasive species to nutrient and water quality management and more. Princeton Hydro’s Dr. Fred Lubnow, Director of Aquatic Programs, and Dr. Stephen Souza, Founder, both of whom have been members of NALMS since its inception, are presenting and exhibiting during the conference.

LEARN MORE

 

October 31 – November 2: Society for American Military Engineers (SAME) Small Business Conference (SBC)

SAME gives leaders from the A/E/C, environmental, and facility management industries the opportunity to come together with federal agencies in order to showcase best practices and highlight future opportunities for small businesses to work in the federal market. Princeton Hydro is proud to be attending the 2018 SAME SBC Conference, which is being held in New Orleans and co-locating with the Department of Veteran’s Affairs’ National Veterans Small Business Engagement. The program consists of networking events, small business exhibits, a variety of speakers and much more.

LEARN MORE & REGISTER

 

STAY TUNED FOR OUR NOVEMBER EVENT SPOTLIGHT!

Restoring and Revitalizing Freshwater Mussels

Freshwater mussels are among the oldest living and second most diverse organisms on Earth with over 1,000 recognized species. Here in the eastern part of the U.S., we have more species of freshwater mussels than anywhere in the world. Unfortunately, freshwater mussels are one of the most rapidly declining animal groups in North America. Out of the 300 species and subspecies found on the continent, 70 (23%) have been federally listed as “Threatened” or “Endangered” under the Endangered Species Act. And, in the last century, over 30 species have become permanently extinct. So, why are populations declining so fast?

Freshwater mussels are filter feeders and process large volumes of the water they live in to obtain food. This means of survival also makes them highly susceptible to industrial and agricultural water pollution.  Because they are constantly filtering water, the contaminants and pathogens that are present are absorbed into the mussel’s tissues. As such, mussels are good indicators of water quality and can greatly contribute to improving water quality by filtering algae, bacteria and organic matter from the water column.

Not only do freshwater mussels rely on water quality, they are dependent on fish and other aquatic organisms for reproductive success. In order for a freshwater mussel to complete the reproduction process, it must “infect” a host fish with its larvae. The method depends on the specie of mussel. Some species lure fish using highly modified and evolved appendages that mimic prey. When a fish goes into investigate the lures, the female mussel releases fertilized eggs that attach to the fish, becoming temporarily parasitic. Once the host fish is infected, it can transfer the mussel larvae upstream and into new areas of the river.

Both habitat loss from dam construction and the introduction of pesticides into the water supply has contributed to the decline of freshwater mussels. With approximately 300 mussel species in the U.S. alone, a critical component of restoring and revitalizing mussel populations is truly understanding their biology, which begins with the ability to properly differentiate each species and properly identify and catalog them. Princeton Hydro’s Senior Scientist Evan Kwityn, CLP and Aquatic Ecologist Jesse Smith recently completed the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service‘s Fresh Water Mussel Identification Training at the National Conservation Training Center in West Virginia.

Through hands-on laboratory training, Evan and Jesse developed their freshwater mussel identification skills and their knowledge of freshwater mussel species biology. Course participants were tasked with mastering approximately 100 of the most common freshwater mussel species in the United States. They also learned about proper freshwater mussel collection labeling, the internal and external anatomy and meristics of a freshwater mussel, and distributional maps as an aid to freshwater mussel identification.

In a recently published press release, Tierra Curry, a senior scientist with the Center for Biological Diversity was quoted as saying, “The health of freshwater mussels directly reflects river health, so protecting the places where these mussels live will help all of us who rely on clean water. This is especially important now, when we see growing threats to clean water from climate change, agriculture and other sources.”

Princeton Hydro is committed to protecting water quality, restoring habitats, and managing natural resources. Read about some of our recent projects and contact us to discuss how we can help you.

To learn more about freshwater mussels, check out this video from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service:

Five Ways to Participate in Lakes Appreciation Month

#LakesAppreciation Month is a great time of year to enjoy your community lakes and help protect them. 

Lakes Appreciation Month was started by North American Lake Management Society (NALMS) to help bring attention to the countless benefits that lakes provide, to raise awareness of the many challenges facing our waterways, and encourage people to get involved in protecting these precious resources.  Unfortunately, the natural beauties that provide clean drinking water and wildlife habitat are at risk. Chemical pollutants, hydrocarbons, stormwater runoff, invasive aquatic species, and climate change are just a few of the the serious threats facing freshwater habitats.  So what can you do to to help?

We’ve put together five tips to help you celebrate Lakes Appreciation Month and get involved in protecting your favorite lakes:

1. Join the “Secchi Dip-In” contest: The “Secchi Dip-In” is an annual citizen science event where lake-goers and associations across North America use a simple Secchi disk to monitor the transparency or turbidity of their local waterway.  This year, Princeton Hydro is offering “Secchi Dip-In” participants a chance to win a $100 Amazon gift card and a one-year membership to NALMSEntry details here.

2. Organize a cleanup event: You can easily organize a lake clean-up in your community! Volunteer cleanups are a great way to get neighbors together around a good cause, raise awareness about the importance of protecting water quality, and make a positive impact on your community waterways. Organizing a volunteer event is a lot easier than you may think. Check out these tips for how to get started.

3. Get involved with your local lake: You can help support your favorite lake by joining a lake or watershed association. As an organized, collective group, lake associations work toward identifying and implementing strategies to protect water quality and ecological integrity. Lake associations monitor the condition of the lake, develop lake management plans, provide education about how to protect the lake, work with the government entities to improve fish habitat, and much more.

4. Monitor and report algae blooms: With the BloomWatch App, you can help the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency understand where and when potential harmful algae blooms (HABs) occur. HABs have the potential to produce toxins that can have serious negative impacts on the health of humans, pets, and our ecosystems. Learn more and download the app.

5. Get outside and enjoy: Whether you enjoy swimming, relaxing on the shoreline, canoeing, or fishing, there are countless ways you can get outside and enjoy your community lakes. Encourage others to appreciate their local waterbodies by taking photos of your lake adventures and sharing them on social media using the hashtag: #LakesAppreciation.

 

Go here to learn more about NALMS and get more ideas on how to celebrate your local lakes. If you’re interested in learning more about Princeton Hydro’s broad range of award-winning lake and pond management services, please contact us.