Identifying, Understanding and Addressing Harmful Algae Blooms

Harmful Algae Bloom Visible in Owasco Lake. Photo by: Tim Schneider

Harmful Algae Blooms (HABs) were in the spotlight this summer due to the severe impacts they had on lakes throughout the country. The nation-wide HABs outbreak caused beach closures, restricted access to lake usage, and wide-ranging health advisories.

What exactly are HABs? Why were they so severe this summer? Will this trend continue? Can anything be done to prevent the occurrence or mitigate the impacts?

In this blog, we provide answers to all of those questions, exploring what HABs are, why they occur, why they were particularly prevalent this summer, and what we can do to combat them.

What are HABs?

Simply put, HABs are rapid, large overgrowths of cyanobacteria. Cyanobacteria, also known as blue-green algae, aren’t actually algae, they are prokaryotes, single-celled aquatic organisms that are closely related to bacteria and can photosynthesize like algae. These microorganisms are a natural part of aquatic ecosystems, but, under the right conditions (primarily heavy rains, followed by hot, sunny days), these organisms can rapidly increase to form cyanobacteria blooms, also known as HABs.

HABs can cause significant water quality issues in lakes and ponds, often forming a visible and sometimes odorous scum on the surface of the water. They can produce toxins that are incredibly harmful (even deadly) to humans, animals, and aquatic organisms. HABs also negatively impact economic health, especially for communities dependent on the income of jobs and tourism generated through their local lakes and waterways.

What causes HABs?

HABs are caused by a complex set of conditions, and many questions remain about exactly why they occur and how to predict their timing, duration, and toxicity. Primarily, HABs are caused by warmer temperatures and stormwater run-off pollutants, including fertilizers with phosphates.

NY Times article, featuring Princeton Hydro, looks at how climate change affects lakes nationwide, using NJ as an example. Photo by: Rick Loomis, NY Times.HABs are induced by an overabundance of nutrients in the water. The two most common nutrients are fixed nitrogen (nitrates and ammonia) and phosphorus. Discharges from wastewater treatment plants, runoff from agricultural operations, excessive fertilizer use in urban/suburban areas, and stormwater runoff can carry nitrogen and phosphorus into waterways and promote the growth of cyanobacteria.

Climate change is also a factor in HAB outbreaks, which typically occur when there are heavy rains followed by high temperatures and sunshine. Climate change is leading to more frequent, more intense rainstorms that drive run-off pollutants into waterways, coupled with more hot days to warm the water. These are the ideal conditions for HABs, which in recent years have appeared in more places, earlier in the summer.

With climate change and increasing nutrient pollution causing HABs to occur more often and in locations not previously affected, it’s important for us to learn as much as we can about HABs so that we can reduce their harmful effects.

What Can I Do to Prevent HABs?

Signs on the closed beach at Hopatcong State Park warn residents of the Harmful Algae Bloom at Lake Hopatcong on July 2019, in Landing, NJ. (Photo by: Danielle Parhizkaran of NorthJersey.comThe number one thing individuals can do to protect their waterbodies and prevent HABs is to reduce phosphorous use and reduce nutrient loads to waters.

According to Dr. Fred Lubnow, Director of Aquatic Programs for Princeton Hydro, “Managing loads of phosphorous in watersheds is even more important as the East Coast becomes increasingly warmer and wetter thanks to climate change. Climate change will likely need to be dealt with on a national and international scale. But local communities, groups, and individuals can have a real impact in reducing phosphorous levels in local waters.”

Here are a few steps you can take to improve water quality in your community lakes:

Controlling stormwater runoff is another critical factor in improving water quality and reducing HABs. There are a number of low-cost green infrastructure techniques that can be implemented on an individual and community-wide scale. You can read more about green infrastructure stormwater management techniques in our recent blog.

In a recent Op/Ed published on NJ.com, Princeton Hydro President Geoff Goll lists four things that residents, businesses, and local governments should do to prevent another HABs outbreak next summer:

  1. Improve aging “gray” infrastructure
  2. Invest in “green” stormwater infrastructure
  3. Implement regional/watershed-based planning
  4. Pass the Water Quality Protection and Jobs Creation Act

“By making the necessary investments, we can simultaneously create jobs, reduce flood impacts, improve fisheries, maintain or increase lakefront property values, improve water quality and preserve our water-based tourism. The time to act is literally now,” said Geoff. Go here, to read the full article.

HABs Management in Action through Floating Wetland Islands:

Nitrogen and phosphorus are utilized by plants, which means they uptake these nutrients to sustain growth. We see this naturally occurring in wetland ecosystems where wetlands act as a natural water filtration system and can actually thrive from nutrients flowing in from external sources.

This process is replicated in floating wetland islands (FWIs), where you typically have a constructed floating mat with vegetation planted directly into the material. The plants then grow on the island, rooting through the floating mat.

This illustration, created by Staff Scientist Ivy Babson, conveys the functionality of a Floating Wetland Island

This illustration, created by Staff Scientist Ivy Babson, conveys the functionality of a Floating Wetland Island

Not only do FWIs assimilate and remove excess nitrogen and phosphorus out of the water, they also provide habitat for fish and other aquatic organisms; help mitigate wave and wind erosion impacts; provide an aesthetic element; and can be part of a holistic lake/pond management strategy. Because of this, FWIs are being utilized to improve water quality and control HABs in lakes and ponds throughout the country. Princeton Hydro has designed and implemented numerous FWIs in waterbodies large and small. Go here to learn how they’re being used in Harveys Lake.

 

Recognizing and monitoring the changes that are taking place in our local waterways brings the problems of climate change, stormwater pollution and the resulting water quality issues closer to home, which can help raise awareness, inspire environmentally-minded action and promote positive, noticeable change.

If you spot what you believe to be a harmful algae bloom in your community lake, contact your local lake association right away. They, along with their lake management team, can assess the situation and determine what further actions need to be taken.

For more information about harmful algae blooms and water quality management, go here: http://bit.ly/pondlake.

Special thanks to Princeton Hydro Staff Scientist Ivy Babson for her contributions to this blog.

Fall Events Spotlight: Conferences, Symposiums, & Fundraisers

This fall, Princeton Hydro is participating in a variety of events, including presenting at conferences that explore topics ranging from floodplain management to stream restoration to stormwater management. Here’s a snapshot of what’s to come:

OCTOBER 3: GREAT SWAMP GALA & SILENT AUCTION

The Great Swamp Watershed Association, a nonprofit organization dedicated to protecting and improving the water resources of the Passaic River region, is hosting its 2019 Gala & Silent Auction. This year’s event is being held in honor of Congresswoman Mikie Sherrill for her commitment to protecting our planet and growing the clean energy economy in New Jersey. The evening will include a cocktail hour, dinner banquet, and expansive silent auction.

LEARN MORE & REGISTER

 

OCTOBER 4: 46th ANNUAL ANJEC ENVIRONMENTAL CONGRESS

The Association of New Jersey Environmental Commissions (ANJEC) is a nonprofit organization that’s been supporting efforts to protect the environment and preserve natural resources in communities throughout New Jersey for 50 years. The Environmental Congress is an annual statewide gathering of environmental commissions, local officials, agencies, citizen groups and environmental organizations, which includes an exhibitors hall, farmer’s market, and workshops on a variety of current environmental topics. Princeton Hydro, a business member of the ANJEC, will be exhibiting during the event. Come say “hello” to our staff at the booth: Vice President Mark Gallagher, Senior Project Manager Kelly Klein, Communications Strategist Dana Patterson, and Marketing Coordinator Kelsey Mattison.

LEARN MORE & REGISTER

 

OCTOBER 9: SOCIETY FOR AMERICAN MILITARY ENGINEERS (SAME) MEGA MARYLAND SMALL BUSINESS CONFERENCE

The conference, being held in Baltimore, gives small and minority businesses in the architecture, engineering and construction industries the opportunity to come together with federal agencies in order to showcase best practices and highlight future opportunities to work in the federal market. Nearly 500 professionals throughout the Mid-Atlantic region are expected to attend this year’s MEGA Maryland, which includes 25+ speakers and 50+ exhibits. Be sure to stop by the Princeton Hydro booth!

LEARN MORE & REGISTER

 

OCTOBER 15 – 17: NEW JERSEY ASSOCIATION FOR FLOODPLAIN MANAGEMENT (NJAFM) 15TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE

NJAFM is hosting its 15th Annual Conference and Exhibition in Atlantic City, NJ. Participants will attend meetings and seminars covering topics, including hazard mitigation, flood insurance, flood modeling, stormwater management, construction standards and more. Princeton Hydro’s Christiana Pollack, GISP, CFM is giving a presentation about the Blue Acres ecological restoration project, which increases storm resiliency by reducing flooding and stormwater runoff by improving the ecological and floodplain function within the former residential properties acquired by the NJDEP Blue Acres Program. This presentation will highlight the green infrastructure techniques employed including restoration of native coastal forest and meadow.

LEARN MORE & REGISTER

 

OCTOBER 16 – 17: 7TH ANNUAL DELAWARE RIVER WATERSHED FORUM

The 7th Annual Delaware River Watershed Forum, taking place in Allentown, PA, brings together organizations and individuals spanning the four watershed states of PA, NY, NJ, and DE. The Forum allows for collaboration among those working on environmental conservation and policy; and provides professional and personal development opportunities. Workshops will focus on topics such as water quality, community engagement, equity, and environmental policy. Princeton Hydro President Geoff Goll, P.E., Senior Project Manager Kelly Klein, and Communications Strategist Dana Patterson are participating in this year’s event. Geoff and Kelly, along with Alan Hunt of the Musconetcong Watershed Association, are leading a “Musconetcong River Restoration Tour” on Oct 16.

Learn More & Register

 

OCTOBER 16 – 17: VILLANOVA STORMWATER MANAGEMENT SYMPOSIUM

The theme of this year’s Villanova University College of Engineering Stormwater Management Symposium is “Building Resilience into Stormwater.” Participants will attend technical sessions, hear a variety of presentations, and have an opportunity to take part in field trips and networking events. Topics covered during the symposium include Water Reuse and Harvesting, Stormwater Regulations and Design, Vegetated Infiltration Systems and more. Princeton Hydro is thrilled to be attending!

Learn More & Register

 

OCTOBER 17: Deal Lake Commission Environmental Education Public Meeting

The Deal Lake Commission (DLC) is hosting an informational gathering for which members of the public are invited to learn about environmental topics related to the lake and surrounding watershed.  At 6:30pm, Princeton Hydro founder Dr. Stephen Souza along with Jeannie Toher, DLC Commissioner, are giving a presentation on stormwater management and green infrastructure. The goal of this workshop session is to demonstrate the types of things that we can all do on a local scale to better control stormwater runoff and reduce nutrient loading, the primary causes of the lake’s water quality challenges.  Following the workshop, stay for the DLC’s monthly meeting and learn what else is going on with the management, restoration and maintenance of Deal Lake.

Learn More

 

OCTOBER 26: THE NATURE CONSERVANCY IN NJ’S OAK LEAF AUCTION

We are a proud sponsor of the Nature Conservancy’s Oak Leaf Auction being held at The Ridge in Basking Ridge, NJ. Participants of this fun fundraising event will enjoy live and silent auctions for items like artwork, weekend getaways, one-of-a-kind experiences, and much more. The evening also includes cocktails, appetizers and networking opportunities.

Learn More About The Nature Conservancy

 

NOVEMBER 1: NEW JERSEY WATERSHED CONFERENCE

New Jersey Watershed Conference, which is an educational event that aims to advance knowledge and communications on issues related to water quality and quantity across the state. The agenda features a variety of presentations from local experts on watershed management, stormwater, green infrastructure, and the problems and solutions related to the health of our watersheds. Princeton Hydro, a proud sponsor of the event, is exhibiting and giving two presentations: Director of Aquatic Programs Dr. Fred Lubnow is presenting on “An Overview of the Causes and Impacts of Harmful Algal Blooms.” Marketing Coordinator Kelsey Mattison is leading a workshop on “Flipping the Script on American Environmental Thought.”

Learn more & Register

 

NOVEMBER 1: NY-NJ HARBOR ESTUARY PROGRAM’S 2019 ANNUAL CONFERENCE

Are you a natural resource manager, scientist, conservation advocate, or policy leader? Join the NY-NJ Harbor & Estuary Program and the Hudson River Foundation for the 2019 Restoration Conference. The conference, titled “Explore Lessons Learned for a Changing Future at HEP,” will explore how habitat restoration can shape our community’s response to a changing climate. The day will feature a series of plenary presentations and interactive workshops that will help participants better understand these challenges, current initiatives, and the state of practice and scientific understanding.

Learn more & Register

 

NOVEMBER 7 – 9: ENGINEERS WITHOUT BORDERS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

Engineers Without Borders (EWB), a nonprofit organization that works to build a better world through engineering projects that aid communities in meeting their basic needs, is hosting its National Conference in Pittsburgh, PA. Staff Engineer Natalie Rodrigues, EIT, CPESC-IT is an active volunteer with EWB. Natalie began volunteering for the organization seven years ago while attending college at the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry where she earned her Bachelor of Science in Environmental Resources Engineering with a focus in water resources. The conference includes dynamic discussions with industry leaders, educational opportunities about complex global challenges that engineers can solve, and networking with the people driving the engineering sector’s socially minded future.

Learn more & Register

 

NOVEMBER 14: SOCIETY FOR AMERICAN MILITARY ENGINEERS (SAME) PHILADELPHIA RESILIENCY SYMPOSIUM

SAME Philadelphia is hosting a one-day symposium featuring experts on infrastructure resiliency in the face of extreme storms, flooding and other natural disasters. Presentation topics include, Coastal Resiliency, Public/Private Partnerships for Resiliency, and Climate Vulnerability and Adaptation/Flood Risk.  Stop by the Princeton Hydro exhibitor booth to say hello to Princeton Hydro President Geoffrey Goll, P.E. and Marketing Coordinator Kelsey Mattison. We hope to see you there!

LEARN MORE & REGISTER

 

NOVEMBER 11 – 15: NORTH AMERICAN LAKE MANAGEMENT SOCIETY (NALMS) CONFERENCE

NALMS‘ 39th International Symposium, being held in Burlington, VT, is themed “Watershed Moments: Harnessing Data, Science, and Local Knowledge to Protect Lakes.” This year’s symposium includes a robust exhibit hall, a variety of field trips, and a wide array of presentations on topics ranging from water level management to combating invasive species to nutrient pollution and more. Dr. Fred Lubnow will be presenting a poster on Harmful Algal Blooms in Lake Hopatcong, and Dr. Stephen Souza, a founding principal of Princeton Hydro, is leading a workshop on Stormwater Management for Lake Managers, which is designed to demonstrate the importance of implementing ecologically appropriate, cost-effective green infrastructure stormwater management techniques as part of comprehensive lake restoration plan. In addition to conference activities, visitors will enjoy Vermont’s scenic beauty and a wide variety of outdoor recreational opportunities.

Learn more & Register

 

NOVEMBER 18 – 20: MID-ATLANTIC STREAM RESTORATION CONFERENCE

Mid-Atlantic Stream Restoration Conference, hosted by the Resource Institute, invites resource professionals, researchers and practitioners to participate in discussions and workshops focused on Building Resilient Streams in the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast regions. Princeton Hydro is giving two presentations during the conference:

  • Columbia Lake Dam Removal; Using Drones for Quantitative Evaluation of River Restoration by Geoffrey Goll, P.E., Princeton Hydro President; Casey Schrading, EIT, Staff Engineer; and Beth Styler-Barry of The Nature Conservancy.
  • Innovative Design and Funding Approaches for Dam Removal Projects Where an Unfunded Mandate Exists by Geoffrey Goll, P.E.; Princeton Hydro President; Kirk Mantay, PWS, GreenTrust Alliance; John Roche, Maryland Department of Environment; and Brett Berkley, GreenVest.
Learn more & Register

 

NOVEMBER 20 – 22: SOCIETY FOR AMERICAN MILITARY ENGINEERS (SAME) SMALL BUSINESS CONFERENCE (SBC)

SAME gives leaders from the A/E/C, environmental, and facility management industries the opportunity to come together with federal agencies in order to showcase best practices and highlight future opportunities for small businesses to work in the federal market. Princeton Hydro’s Chief Operating Officer Kevin M. Yezdimer, PE and Communication Strategist Dana Patterson are attending the 2019 SAME SBC Conference, which is being held in Dallas, Texas. The program consists of networking events, small business exhibits, a variety of speakers and much more.

LEARN MORE & REGISTER

 

STAY TUNED FOR MORE EVENT SPOTLIGHTS!

Dr. Fred Lubnow of Princeton Hydro Featured in Magazine Article on Chautauqua Lake

The U.S. is home to thousands of lakes both natural and manmade. Lakes are incredibly important features in the landscape that provide numerous beneficial services, including domestic water supply, hydro-electric power, agricultural water supply, recreation, and tourism. They also provide essential habitat for fish, wildlife and aquatic organisms.

Lakes are complex and dynamic systems, each situated in a unique landscape context. Maintaining the ecological health of a lake is no easy feat. A lot goes on behind the scenes to maintain water quality and a balanced lake ecosystem. Successful, long-term lake management requires a proactive approach that addresses the causes of its water quality problems rather than simply reacting to weed and algae growth and other symptoms of eutrophication.

Chautauqua Magazine recently published an article about the science behind the management of Chautauqua Lake, which features our Director of Aquatic Programs Dr. Fred Lubnow. We’ve included an excerpt below. Click here to view the full article and photos:

Dr. Fred Lubnow is a scientist and director of aquatic programs at Princeton Hydro, a consulting organization based in Exton, Pennsylvania, that is often called on to support lake and watershed regions that want to develop a long-term plan for lake conservation.

He says that while his firm focuses on the development of data and intelligence to inform decision making in regard to freshwater ecosystems, his work is really about coalition building.

“As a scientist and a consultant, you learn over time that you are building a coalition stakeholders and determining what we can agree on to help everyone in the community,” Lubnow said.

Ten years ago, Princeton Hydro was hired to do some stream and inlet monitoring for various stakeholders at Chautauqua Lake. More recently, they’ve been contracted to conduct third-party monitoring of the impacts of the Spring 2019 herbicide applications in the south basin of Chautauqua Lake…

Continue reading!

 

Princeton Hydro is the industry leader in lake restoration and watershed management. We have conducted diagnostic studies and have developed management and restoration plans for over 300 lakes and watersheds throughout the country. This has included work for public and private recreational lakes, major water supply reservoir, and watershed management initiatives conducted as part of USEPA and/or state funded programs. For more information about our lake management services, go here: http://bit.ly/pondlake. 

Washington Post’s Climate Story Features Princeton Hydro

Photo credit: The Washington Post

Did you know that New Jersey is one of the fastest-warming states in the nation? Not only that, did you know the average temperature increase in the state is double the average of the rest of the Lower 48 states?

In a recent article, the Washington Post uncovers quite startling findings from analysis of more than a century of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration temperature data across the Lower 48 states and 3,107 counties. The article takes a specific look at the impacts climate change has had on Lake Hopatcong.

Princeton Hydro has been working with Lake Hopatcong for 30+ years, restoring the lake, managing the watershed, reducing pollutant loading, and addressing invasive aquatic plants and nuisance algae bloomsLake Hopatcong has one of the longest, continuous, long-term ecological databases in New Jersey; 30+ years of consistently collected water quality data.

Dr. Fred Lubnow, Director of Aquatic Programs, and Katie Walston, Senior Scientist, are featured in the Washington Post article. Here’s an excerpt:

On a cool but sunny day in May, Fred Lubnow, director of aquatic programs at Princeton Hydro, and Katie Walston, a senior scientist there, pulled up their anchor in Lake Hopatcong to find it covered with aquatic weeds. The culprit? Fertilizer runoff combined with winters too warm to kill them off.

“The plants start growing earlier and linger around longer, as well,” Lubnow said. The thick ice blocked sunlight from nurturing the weeds. But “in some of these shallow areas, as early as February, we’re looking through the ice seeing the plants growing.”

By summer, the weeds become a nuisance, forcing the state government to “harvest” them with large paddles and toss them onto a conveyor belt, then onto barges. Some years, funding has been hard to get, delaying harvesting and angering homeowners.

“If this area is not harvested, you can’t get a boat through it,” Lubnow says. Swimming isn’t possible, either. Fishing becomes difficult.

Get the full Washington Post story here!

If you’d like to read more about climate change, check out our recent blog:

Four Ways Climate Change Can Affect Your Lake

 

 

 

Managing Urban Stormwater Runoff and Revitalizing Natural Habitat at Harveys Lake

Measuring 630+ acres, Harveys Lake, located in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, just northeast of Wilkes-Barre, is the largest natural lake (by volume) within the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and is one of the most heavily used lakes in the area. It is classified as a high quality – cold water fishery habitat (HQ-CWF) and is designated for protection under the classification.

Since 2002, The Borough of Harveys Lake and the Harveys Lake Environmental Advisory Council  has worked with Princeton Hydro on a variety of lake management efforts focused around maintaining high water quality conditions, strengthening stream banks and shorelines, and managing stormwater runoff.

Successful, sustainable lake management requires identifying and correcting the cause of eutrophication as opposed to simply reacting to the symptoms of eutrophication (algae and weed growth). As such, we collect and analyze data to identify the problem sources and use these scientific findings to develop a customized management plan that includes a combination of biological, mechanical, and source control solutions. Here are some examples of the lake management strategies we’ve utilized for Harveys Lake:

 

Floating Wetland Islands

Floating Wetland Islands (FWIs) are an effective alternative to large, watershed-based natural wetlands. Often described as self-sustaining, FWIs provide numerous ecological benefits. They assimilate and remove excess nutrients, like nitrate and phosphorous, that could fuel algae growth; provide habitat for fish and other aquatic organisms; help mitigate wave and wind erosion impacts; and provide an aesthetic element. FWIs are also highly adaptable and can be sized, configured, and planted to fit the needs of nearly any lake, pond, or reservoir.

Five floating wetland islands were installed in Harveys Lake to assimilate and reduce nutrients already in the lake. The islands were placed in areas with high concentrations of nutrients, placed 50 feet from the shoreline and tethered in place with steel cables and anchored. A 250-square-foot FWI is estimated to remove up to 10 pounds of nutrients per year, which is significant when it comes to algae.

Princeton Hydro worked with the Harveys Lake Environmental Advisory Council and the Borough of Harveys Lake to obtain funding for the FWIs through the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP).

 

Streambank & Shoreline Stabilization

Harveys Creek

The shoreline habitat of Harveys Lake is minimal and unusual in that a paved road encompasses the lake along the shore with most of the homes and cottages located across the roadway, opposite the lake. In addition to the lake being located in a highly populated area, the limited shoreline area adds to the challenges created by urban stormwater runoff.

Runoff from urban lands and erosion of streambanks and shorelines delivers nutrients and sediment to Harveys Lake. High nutrient levels in the lake contribute to algal blooms and other water quality issues. In order to address these challenges, the project team implemented a number of small-scale streambank and inlet stabilization projects with big impacts.

The work included the stabilization of the streambank downstream for Harveys Lake dam and along Harveys Creek, the design and installation of a riparian buffer immediately along the lake’s shoreline, and selective dredging to remove sediment build up in critical areas throughout the watershed.

 

Invasive Species Management

Hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata), an aggressively growing aquatic plant, took root in the lake in 2014 and quickly infected 250 acres of the lake in a matter of three years. If left untreated, hydrilla will grow to the water’s surface and create a thick green mat, which prevents sunlight from reaching native plants, fish and other organisms below. The lack of sunlight chokes out all aquatic life.

In order to prevent hydrilla from spreading any further, Princeton Hydro and SePRO conducted an emergency treatment of the impacted area utilizing the systemic herbicide Sonar® (Fluridone), a clay-based herbicide. SonarOne, manufactured by SePRO, blocks hydrilla’s ability to produce chloroplasts, which in turn halts the photosynthetic process. The low-concentration herbicide does not harm fish, wildlife or people using the lake. Surveys conducted after the treatment showed it was working – the hydrilla had turned white and was dying off. Additional Sonar treatments followed and efforts to eradicate hydrilla in the lake continue.

Dr. Fred Lubnow, our Director of Aquatic Programs, estimates complete eradication of the aquatic plant could take around five years. Everyone can do their part in preventing the spread of this and other invasive species. Boaters and lake users must be vigilant and remove all vegetation from the bottom of watercrafts and trailers.

 

Stormwater Best Management Practices (BMPs)

In 2009, Princeton Hydro developed a stormwater implementation plan (SIP) for Harveys Lake. The goal of the stormwater/watershed-based efforts was to reduce the lake’s existing annual total phosphorus load to be in full compliance with the established Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL). This TMDL is related to watershed-based pollutant loads from total phosphorus (TP) and total suspended solids (TSS), which can contribute to algal blooms.

A number of structural urban runoff projects were implemented throughout the watershed. This includes the design and construction of two natural stream channel projects restoring 500 linear feet of tributaries and reducing the sediment and nutrient loads entering the lake. A series of 38 urban runoff BMPs, including nutrient separating devices and roadside infiltration, were installed in areas immediately adjacent to the lake to further reduce the loads of nutrients and other pollutants reaching the lake.

The photos below show a stormwater project that was completed in the Hemlock Gardens Section of the Watershed. Hemlock Gardens is a 28-acre section of land located in the southeastern portion of the watershed. It contains approximately 26 homes, has very steep slopes, unpaved dirt roads, and previously had no stormwater infrastructure in place.

Two structural stormwater BMPs were installed:

  • A nutrient separating baffle box, which utilizes a three-chamber basin with screens to collect leaf litter, grass clippings and trash
  • A water polishing unit that provides a platform for secondary runoff treatment

In 1994, Harveys Lake was identified as “impaired” by PADEP due to large algal blooms. In 2014, Harveys Lake was removed from the list of impaired waters. Project partners attribute the recovery of this lake to the stream restoration, urban runoff BMP implementation, and the use of in-lake nutrient reduction strategies.

The Harveys Lake Watershed Protection Plan Implementation Project proved that despite the lake being located in an urbanized watershed, it is possible to implement cost-effective green infrastructure and stormwater retrofit solutions capable of significantly decreasing pollutant loading to the lake.

To learn more about our lake and pond management services or schedule a consultation, visit: http://bit.ly/pondlake.

*FREE DOWNLOADS* 2019 NJ Land Rally Presentations

The New Jersey Conservation Foundation held its 23rd Annual NJ Land Conservation Rally, a one-day educational conference focused on “Conservation Innovations in a Changing World.” The day included networking activities, workshops, and a keynote address given by the First Lady of New Jersey Tammy Snyder Murphy.

During the conference, Princeton Hydro, a proud sponsor of the event, lead three workshops on a variety of topics. Below, we provide a synopsis and free download of each presentation:

 

Fundraising & Marketing Strategy:
“Nonprofit Storytelling A-Z: How to Transform Passive Clickers into Action Takers”

Our Communication Strategist, Dana Patterson, along with Lindsay McNamara of the National Audubon Society lead a workshop that taught participants how to use values-driven and science-congruent narratives to reach key stakeholders and supporters in the New Jersey conservation community and beyond. Dana and Lindsay demonstrated how to implement humanistic storytelling strategies and translate technical stats and science findings into interesting, relatable stories that will resonate with and activate valuable target audiences.

Download the full presentation

 

Community Education & Outreach:
“Floating Classroom: Successful Citizen Science on New Jersey’s Largest Lake”

Chris Mikolajczyk, CLM, our Senior Aquatic Scientist, and Donna Macalle-Holly, Grant and Program Director for Lake Hopatcong Foundation, discussed how to start an innovative citizen science project in the community. For the presentation, they showcased a recently launched and highly successful citizen-science initiative: the “Floating Classroom.” Together, the Lake Hopatcong Foundation and Princeton Hydro conceptualized, funded, and launched a custom-built 40-foot education vessel that provides community members and students an interactive, hands-on education experience to explore Lake Hopatcong while learning about freshwater ecology. This initiative has helped to engage the community in stewardship while continuing to closely monitor the lake’s water quality.

Download the full presentation

 

Ecology & Stewardship:
“From Scum to Fish – A Journey Through the Aquatic Food Web and its Management”

Our Director of Aquatic Programs, Dr. Fred Lubnow, and our Senior Aquatic Ecologist, Dr. Jack Szczepanski, lead a workshop on the many facets that make-up a healthy freshwater ecosystem. They explored the various types of life that inhabit the aquatic environment: from algae and cyanobacteria to submerged aquatic vegetation and fish. And, they delved into each one’s place in the food web, how they interact with each other, their effects on the health of the water they live in, and management techniques to tackle water quality issues associated with each.

Download the full presentation

 

The NJ Land Conservation Rally conference also included presentations on topics ranging from environmental advocacy to land acquisition to urban conservation to non-profit organizational management. To view presentation hand-outs and learn more about the conference, go here.

Princeton Hydro is a proud supporter of the New Jersey Conservation Foundation, a private, nonprofit organization that relies on philanthropic support and grants from a variety of public and private organizations and individual donors. Through acquisition and stewardship, they protect strategic lands, promote strong land use policies, and forge partnerships through education and assistance programs. Since 1960, New Jersey Conservation Foundation has protected over 120,000 acres of natural areas and farmland in New Jersey – from the Highlands to the Pine Barrens to the Delaware Bay, from farms to forests to urban and suburban parks. For more information, or to become a member, go here.

Winter Events Spotlight: Environmental Conferences & Classes

Over the coming months, Princeton Hydro is teaching courses and presenting at a variety of conferences that explore topics ranging from wetland restoration to cyanotoxins to dam removal:

 

January 2019 – May 2019: Temple University Wetland Ecology Course

Our Vice President Mark Gallagher, along with Founding Principal and Consultant Dr. Steve Souza, is teaching an applied wetland ecology graduate course at Temple University. The 17-week spring semester course, which includes weekly lectures as well as field trips, will provide students with an opportunity to study real-world examples of wetland and riparian restoration and the integration of wetland ecology and restoration design within the context of green infrastructure.

Students will gain an increased understanding of the ecological functions of wetland and riparian ecosystems; be introduced to the principles of applied ecology as related to wetland and riparian ecosystem restoration; learn about the application of wetland ecology in landscape restoration and enhancement projects; get hands-on experience with how to use green infrastructure techniques in urban and suburban settings to control and abate stormwater impacts; and learn about related state and federal rules and regulations.

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January 2019 – May 2019: Delaware Valley University Watershed Management Course

Beginning January 22, Dr. Fred Lubnow, our Director of Aquatic Programs, is teaching a spring semester “Watershed Management” course at Delaware Valley University. Through hands-on laboratory exercises and engaging lectures, the course provides participants with the foundational skills needed to understand the concepts and terminology of hydrologic processes and watersheds. The concepts and processes include evapotranspiration, soil water, infiltration, runoff, and stream flow. Students will also develop skills in environmental awareness, ecological awareness, and land stewardship, which will help them understand the key processes involved in managing watershed resources sustainably.

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January 27-30, 2019: Delaware Estuary Science and Environmental Summit, Cape May, NJ

Every two years, the Partnership for the Delaware Estuary holds a summit that focuses on developing practical solutions to challenges facing our tidal Delaware River and Bay. This year, the theme is Estuary 2029: Saving Our System Through Collaboration. Our Communications Strategist, Dana Patterson, is presenting “Strategic Science Communication & Stakeholder Engagement in the Delaware Estuary” during the Strategic Science Communication Session on Monday, January 28th. 

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March 6-7, 2019: Pennsylvania Lake Management Society’s 29th Annual Conference

This two-day conference covers a wide range of topics such as invasive aquatic plant identification and eradication, harmful algal blooms (HABS), case studies of publicly funded projects and stewardship programs, management or remediation techniques, habitat or fishery improvement, and chemical application techniques. Core and category credits are available for professional chemical applicators for many of the presentations.  We’re proud to sponsor this conference year after year.  Dr. Fred Lubnow, Princeton Hydro’s Director of Aquatic Programs, is giving a presentation about utilizing a watershed implementation plan to address both the external and internal phosphorus loads for Lake Carey, Pennsylvania.  Come visit our booth and say hello to our Aquatics team members. BONUS: Every full conference registration also includes one free year of PALMS membership.

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March 9, 2019: Watershed Congress Along the Schuylkill River

Hosted by the Delaware Riverkeeper Network, this conference is a highly anticipated event for people in the Schuylkill Watershed and beyond interested in understanding, protecting, and restoring their local streams and watersheds. Princeton Hydro is a proud sponsor and exhibitor of this conference. Come check out an hour-long, dynamic session on “Using Values-Driven Communication Strategies To Engage Your Watershed,” hosted by our Communications Strategist, Dana Patterson.

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March 14, 2019: Land Ethics Symposium

Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve presents its 19th Annual Land Ethics Symposium. The conference, titled “Creative Approaches for Ecological Landscaping,” will focus on ways to create low-maintenance, economical and ecologically balanced landscapes using native plants and restoration techniques.

Participants can take part in presentations, for which continuing education credits are available, on topics, including Urban Restoration Ecology, Economic Ecology: Thinking Regionally & Working Together to Solve Water Resource Issues, and Wetland Restoration. The conference also offers a variety of networking events and an exhibitor hall. Princeton Hydro, a sponsor of the event, will have an exhibitor table. We hope to see you there!

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March 21, 2019: The Pennsylvania Water Works Association’s Northeast District Spring Meeting

The PA-AWWA Northeast District and the Water Works Operators’ Association of Pennsylvania Eastern Section are hosting a Spring 2019 Meeting, which will cover a range of technical topics related to water resource management. Dr. Fred Lubnow is teaching a three-hour course on the monitoring and management of cyanotoxins in sources of raw water.

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March 22, 2019: The Soil & Water Conservation Society (SWCS) Southern New England Chapter (SNEC) 2019 Annual Winter Conference

SWCSSNEC is a 501 (c) (3) organization whose purpose is to promote, educate and advance all phases of the science of conservation of soil, water, and all related resources. The Annual Winter Conference, themed “Going with the Flow”, offers a variety of presentations focused on topics related to stream continuity.

Director of our New England office Laura Wildman, PE, considered one of the foremost experts on barrier removal and alternative fish passage techniques, is giving a presentation titled “Dam Removal; When Less is More”. Other presentation topics include: environmental monitoring and unmanned aircraft systems (UAS)/drones; rehabilitation of aging structures to allow fish migration; and ecological disruption associated with road-stream crossings.

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March 27, 2019: NEW JERSEY INVASIVE SPECIES STRIKE TEAM ANNUAL CONFERENCE

Presented by the Friends of Hopewell Valley Open Space, the Annual New Jersey Invasive Species Strike Team Conference is considered the most comprehensive state-wide forum on invasive species. The conference, being held at Duke Farms, brings participants together to collaborate and address new and emerging invasive species issues from a state-wide perspective, and includes an exhibitor hall, networking opportunities and a variety of presentations and panel discussions on topics, including river restoration, managing deer and invasive species to improve forest health, and meadow restoration tips.

Princeton Hydro, a proud sponsor of the conference, will be exhibiting and presenting. Mark Gallagher, Princeton Hydro Vice President, along with Jenn Rogers of Mercer County Park Commission, will present on the topic of freshwater tidal wetland at John A. Roebling Memorial Park in New Jersey. Mercer County Park Commission and Princeton Hydro worked together to reduce and control invasive, and restore the park’s Abbott Marshland. Read more about the project here: http://bit.ly/RoeblingMarshRestoration

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March 30, 2019: Northwest New Jersey Rivers Conference

Free and open to the public, the Delaware River Watershed Initiative’s Northwest New Jersey Rivers Conference is an event focused around working together to protect the Delaware River, specifically related to the Highlands and Ridge & Valley regions of New Jersey. Presentation topics include river conservation and restoration, community outreach and education, sustainable agriculture and food waste reduction, and much more. Attendees will walk alway with tangible ideas for how to bring their communities together to defend and share the Delaware River and its precious resources.

The first workshop of the day is a panel discussion titled, “Environmental Commissions: The Why and How of Getting Started in Your Community”, at which Princeton Hydro’s Communication Strategist Dana Patterson will be fielding questions from the audience. We hope to see you there!

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Also, Coming Up This Spring:
April 4-6, 2019: ATLANTIC ESTUARINE RESEARCH SOCIETY (AERS) SPRING MEETING

This year’s AERS Spring Meeting, titled “From the head of the tide to the edge of the shelf,” will emphasize the breath and spatial scale of estuaries and coasts. Participants will gather at George Mason University’s brand-new Potomac Science Center to hear a variety of presentations on topics ranging from freshwater tidal ecosystems to coastal oceans, and particularly the connections and exchange between these systems. Princeton Hydro’s Senior Aquatics Scientist Jack Szczepanski, PhD is presenting and exhibiting at the conference.

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April 12, 2019: New Jersey Land Conservation Rally

Conservation Innovations in a Changing World is the theme this year for the 23rd Annual NJ Land Conservation Rally. We’re excited to sponsor this one-day educational conference about preserving open space and farmland in New Jersey. Start your morning off with a dynamic marketing session, “Nonprofit Storytelling A-Z: How to Transform Passive Clickers into Action Takers,” hosted by Princeton Hydro’s Communications Strategist, Dana Patterson and National Audubon Society‘s Mid-Level Giving Manager, Lindsay McNamara.  Check out a great afternoon session with our Aquatics Director, Dr. Fred Lubnow, and Senior Aquatic Scientist, Dr. Dr. Jack Szczepanski, who will offer tips on, “The Monitoring and Management of Cyanotoxins in Recreational Lakes and Managing Your Lake’s Fisheries.” And, don’t forget to say “hello” to all of our staff at our exhibitor booth during the conference.

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April 12, 2019: Environmental Business Council of New England Meeting

Princeton Hydro recently joined as a business member of the Environmental Business Council (EBC) of New England, a nonprofit organization dedicated to enhancing business and job growth of both established and emerging environmental and energy businesses. EBC provides member companies with an array of programs, activities, and information to enable them to stay on the cutting edge of environmental and energy technologies, management and regulatory developments. At this EPC meeting, our Director of our New England office, Laura Wildman, PE, and Fluvial Geomorphologist, Paul Woodworth, are hosting a workshop for members on “Dam Removal and Sediment Management.”

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STAY TUNED FOR MORE EVENT SPOTLIGHTS!

Deal Lake Commission Wins Award For “Lake Management Success”

NALMS President Dr. Frank Browne with Princeton Hydro Co-Founder Dr. Stephen Souza accepting the “Lake Management Success Stories” award on behalf of the Deal Lake Commission.

The Deal Lake Commission’s success in the management and restoration of Deal Lake garners a prestigious award from the North American Lake Management Society

 

The North American Lake Management Society (NALMS) awarded the Deal Lake Commission (DLC) with its “2018 Lake Management Success Stories” award. The award, which was presented at the NALMS 38th International Symposium, is given annually to recognize and honor an individual or group that has made significant lake/reservoir management accomplishments.

The DLC has overseen the management and restoration of Deal Lake and its watershed since 1974. Consisting of appointees from the seven municipalities abutting the lake, the DLC’s mission is to provide leadership, guidance and resources to preserve and restore Deal Lake and its tributaries as a healthy and stable ecosystem. A true challenge in an urban environment.

“It has been both a pleasure and an honor to work with the Deal Lake Commission for the past 35 years,” said Dr. Stephen Souza, Princeton Hydro Co-Founder. “They have shown great resolve to tackle some serious problems affecting the lake and its watershed, serving as a great example for other organizations involved in the restoration of urban lakes.”

Deal Lake is New Jersey’s largest coastal lake, encompassing 162 acres. The lake is surrounded by a 4,400-acre highly urbanized watershed, with the majority of development dating back to the 1960s-1980s. As a result, stormwater management, particularly with respect to water quality and volume management can be especially challenging. The DLC has embraced the numerous challenges, and has worked diligently over the years to correct these issues.

Restored shoreline at the Asbury Park Boat Launch in Deal LakeAt the forefront, the DLC has been managing the primary cause of the lake’s eutrophication: stormwater runoff from the surrounding watershed. In 2014, with funding provided through the NJDEP’s 319(h) program, the DLC implemented a number of demonstration projects, specifically the construction of three bioretention basins, the installation of a large manufactured treatment device, the vegetative stabilization of over 500 feet of heavily eroded sections of the shoreline, and the construction of a rain garden at the Deal Lake boat launch.

Collectively these projects were shown to eliminate localized flooding, decrease floatable loading, and reduce nutrient, sediment and pathogen inputs to the lake. These and other projects implemented by the DLC over the years show that despite Deal Lake being located in a highly urbanized watershed, it is possible to implement cost-effective green infrastructure and stormwater retrofit solutions.

Deal Lake recently won another very competitive 319 (h) program for $735,000 for MTDs, tree boxes, and Green infrastructure improvements to Deal Lake, Sunset Lake and Wesley Lake.

The NALMS award nomination application, which was submitted by Dr. Souza, listed a number of additional achievements of the DLC, including:

  • Educating the community, including school children, to increase awareness and appreciation for the natural environment of the lake;
  • Sponsoring and conducting public engaged spring and fall cleanups, which annually result in the removal of 1,000s of pounds of refuse and debris from the lake;
  • Helping homeowners and public groups recognize and mindfully solve problems related to water quality, siltation, and lake restoration;
  • Serving as the liaison between lakeside communities, County agencies, and the NJDEP;
  • Microbial source tracking investigations with Monmouth University and pathogen source identification work with Clean Ocean Action to decrease E. coli loading;
  • Carp removal, invasive species management, and goose control initiatives;
  • Working with State legislators to implement stricter stormwater controls to reduce pollutant loading, increase storm resiliency, and improve recreational fishing;
  • Participating in the NALMS Secchi Dip In; and
  • Proactively suggesting and supporting community-based, practical ideas to improve the overall environmental quality of the lake and its enjoyment by boaters, anglers, hikers, residents and visitors.

For more information on the Deal Lake Commission, visit DealLake.org.

The successful, long-term improvement of a lake or pond requires a proactive management approach that addresses the beyond simply reacting to weed and algae growth and other symptoms of eutrophication. Our staff can design and implement holistic, ecologically-sound solutions for the most difficult weed and algae challenges. Visit our website to learn more about Princeton Hydro’s lake management services: http://bit.ly/pondlake.

November Events Spotlight: Conferences Throughout the Country

Princeton Hydro is participating in a variety of conferences taking place throughout the country that address topics ranging from lake management to green infrastructure resiliency:

October 30 – November 2: North American Lake Management Society (NALMS) Conference

NALMS is hosting its 38th International Symposium in Cincinnati Ohio, titled “Now Trending: Innovations in Lake Management.” This year’s symposium includes a robust exhibit hall, a variety of field trips, and a wide array of presentations on topics ranging from the latest in monitoring technologies to combating invasive species to nutrient and water quality management and more. Princeton Hydro’s Dr. Fred Lubnow, Director of Aquatic Programs, and Dr. Stephen Souza, Founder, both of whom have been members of NALMS since its inception, are presenting and exhibiting during the conference.

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October 31 – November 2: Society for American Military Engineers (SAME) Small Business Conference (SBC)

SAME gives leaders from the A/E/C, environmental, and facility management industries the opportunity to come together with federal agencies in order to showcase best practices and highlight future opportunities for small businesses to work in the federal market. Princeton Hydro is proud to be attending the 2018 SAME SBC Conference, which is being held in New Orleans and co-locating with the Department of Veteran’s Affairs’ National Veterans Small Business Engagement. The program consists of networking events, small business exhibits, a variety of speakers and much more.

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November 2: The 2nd Annual New Jersey Watershed Conference

We are a proud sponsor of this year’s New Jersey Watershed Conference, which is an educational event that aims to advance knowledge and communications on issues related to water quality and quantity across the state. The agenda features a variety of presentations from local experts on watershed management, stormwater, green infrastructure, and the problems and solutions related to the health of our watersheds. Princeton Hydro is exhibiting & our Marketing Coordinator, Kelsey Mattison, is leading a workshop on “How Social Media can be a Champion for your Watershed.”

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November 4 – 8: 2018 American Water Resources Association Conference

The AWRA’s 53rd Annual Water Resources Conference is being held in Baltimore, MD. Community, conversations and connections are highlights of every AWRA conference and the 2018 conference will provide plenty of opportunities for all three, including an exhibitor hall, networking events, and variety of presentations and technical sessions. Princeton Hydro’s Christiana Pollack, GISP, CFM is giving a presentation on flood assessment and mitigation. 

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November 8 – 10: Engineers Without Borders (EWB) USA Conference

The EWB, a nonprofit humanitarian organization that partners with developing communities worldwide in order to improve their quality of life, is hosting its USA National Conference in San Francisco.  The ​annual ​conference ​will ​address ​the ​theme ​“Engineers Unlock Potential.” ​Experts, ​practitioners, ​decision-makers, ​young ​professionals ​and ​students ​from ​a ​range ​of ​sectors ​will come together to network, exchange ideas, foster new thinking and develop solutions to the world’s most pressing infrastructure ​challenges. Princeton Hydro Staff Engineer Natalie Rodrigues, EIT, CPESC-IT, a EWB member, is attending the conference and presentation. Her session, titled “So You Think You Might Like to be an EWB Regional Officer or State Representative, ” is designed for those interested in taking the next step beyond Chapter or Project participation at EWB-USA, as well as for current Regional Steering Committee members who want to “amp up” their game.

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November 13: Society for American Military Engineers (SAME) Philadelphia Resiliency Symposium

SAME Philadelphia is hosting an all day symposium featuring experts on infrastructure resiliency in the face of extreme storms, flooding and other natural disasters. Presentation topics include, Flood Hazard Risk and Climate Change Effects for Bulk Oil Storage Facilities; Post-Storm Infrastructure Improvements and Stream Restoration; and Resilience Risk Analysis and Engineering. Princeton Hydro President Geoffrey Goll, P.E. is giving a presentation titled, “Enhancing Coastal Habitat & Increasing Resiliency through Beneficial Reuse of Dredged Material in New Jersey.” We hope to see you there!

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November 16: NJ Chapter American Water Resources Association (NJ-AWRA) Future Risk Symposium

As the frequency and intensity of storm events changes, how should watershed managers, engineers, and planners make informed decisions for the future? NJ-AWRA’s 2018 Future Risk Symposium, held at Duke Farms in Hillsborough, NJ, will focus on Future Flooding in Riverine Systems with presentations on climate trends, modeling, and planning that can be used in NJ to prepare for future flood events in New Jersey’s riverine systems. Princeton Hydro’s Christiana Pollack, GISP, CFM is giving a presentation on flood assessment, and the concepts and methods used to estimate flood risk for existing conditions and the year 2050.

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STAY TUNED FOR MORE EVENT SPOTLIGHTS!

Efforts to Manage Hydrilla in Harveys Lake Prove Difficult but Effective

Collaboration between state agencies and local organizations in Luzerne County bring in grant money to determine Hydrilla infestation levels in Harveys Lake. Treatment efforts are scheduled for 2019.

Story provided by Princeton Hydro Senior Limnologist Michael Hartshorne, and originally published in the Pennsylvania iMapInvasives Fall 2018 Newsletter

Hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata)

Hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata) is a relatively new invasive plant in Pennsylvania with the first documented occurrence in 1989 in Adams County. Still, it was not until recently that lake managers, park rangers, and others in the natural resource field have turned their attention to this aggressive invader. Looking incredibly similar to our native waterweed (Elodea canadensis), hydrilla differs in that it is comprised of 4-8 whorled, toothed leaves in contrast to the smooth edged, 3-leaved whorl of E. canadensis.

 

Harveys Lake, located in the Borough of Harveys Lake (Luzerne County) is a large, deep glacial lake with limited littoral (i.e., shoreline) habitat. A significant body of work has been conducted at the lake with the original Phase I: Diagnostic-Feasibility Lake study conducted in 1992 and a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) issued for phosphorus in 2002.

From 2002 to present, Princeton Hydro has assisted the Borough in the restoration of the lake with a heavy focus on stormwater best management practices (BMPs) supplemented by routine, in-lake water quality monitoring. The goal of the storm water/watershed-based efforts was to reduce the lake’s existing, annual total Hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata) phosphorus load so it’s in full compliance with the established TMDL.

Mapped locations noted in 2014 and 2015 of hydrilla in Harveys Lake as documented in the Pennsylvania iMapInvasives database.

Over the last 15 years, the installation of these watershed-based projects has led to improved water quality conditions; specifically, phosphorus and algae concentrations have been reduced. While water quality conditions improved Harveys Lake, it was during one of the routine, summer water quality monitoring events conducted in July 2014 that a dense stand of hydrilla was noted at the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission’s public boat launch. More than likely, the plant entered the lake as a “hitchhiker” on the boat or trailer being launched from this public boat launch by someone visiting the lake.

Hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata) Credit: Nick Decker, DCNR Bureau of State Parks

Since the initial identification and confirmation of the hydrilla, the Borough of Harveys Lake has worked in conjunction with the Harveys Lake Environmental Advisory Council, the Luzerne County Conservation District, the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, and Princeton Hydro to secure funding for additional surveys to determine the spatial extent and density of growth followed by an aggressive eradication plan.

Grant funds already allocated to Harveys Lake under the state’s Non-Point Source Pollution Program were used to conduct a detailed boat-based and diving aquatic plant survey of Harveys Lake to delineate the distribution and relative abundance of the hydrilla in 2014. During these surveys, the distribution of the hydrilla was found to be limited to the northern portion of the lake with the heaviest densities just off the boat launch with plants observed growing in waters 20-25 feet deep.

A follow-up survey had shown hydrilla coverage to increase from 38% of surveyed sites to 58% of sites in 2016 with hydrilla now present at the lake’s outlet area. Spatial coverage of hydrilla increased from approximately 50 acres in 2014 to 210 acres in 2016, an increase of 160 acres.

This map shows the 2018 proposed treatment area of Harvey’s Lake. Due to funding issues, treatment is now scheduled for 2019. The current hydrilla distribution encompasses the entire littoral zone of Harvey’s Lake.

In hopes of preventing hydrilla escaping into the lake’s outlet stream, the Borough of Harveys Lake funded an emergency treatment of the two-acre outlet area in 2016 utilizing the systemic herbicide Sonar® (Fluridone). A follow-up treatment of 159 acres was conducted in 2017, again utilizing the Fluridone-based systemic herbicide.

The next treatment, which will attempt to cover the majority of the littoral habitat covered by hydrilla, is scheduled for late spring/early summer of 2019. It should be noted that Sonar® is being applied at a low concentration that is effective at eradicating the hydrilla, but will not negatively impact desirable native plant species.

The treatments conducted to date have documented some reductions in the vegetative coverage of hydrilla as well as tuber production relative to the original plant surveys conducted in 2016. However, it is recognized that it will take multiple years of treatment to eradicate this nuisance plant from the lake, as well as a highly proactive, interactive program to educate residents as well as visitors to the lake in preventing the re-introduction of this or other invasive species to Harveys Lake.

 

The successful, long-term improvement of a lake or pond requires a proactive management approach that addresses the beyond simply reacting to weed and algae growth and other symptoms of eutrophication. Our staff can design and implement holistic, ecologically-sound solutions for the most difficult weed and algae challenges. Visit our website to learn more about Princeton Hydro’s lake management services: http://bit.ly/pondlake

Michael Hartshorne‘s  primary areas of expertise include lake and stream diagnostic studies, TMDL development, watershed management, and small pond management and lake restoration. He is particularly skilled in all facets of water quality characterization, from field data collection to subsequent statistical analysis, modeling, technical reporting, and the selection and implementation of best management practices. He has extensive experience in utilizing water quality data in concert with statistical and modeling packages to support load reduction allocations for the achievement of water quality standards or tailored thresholds set forth to reduce the rate of cultural eutrophication. He also has significant experience in conducting detailed macrophyte, fishery, and benthic surveys.