*FREE DOWNLOADS* 2019 NJ Land Rally Presentations

The New Jersey Conservation Foundation held its 23rd Annual NJ Land Conservation Rally, a one-day educational conference focused on “Conservation Innovations in a Changing World.” The day included networking activities, workshops, and a keynote address given by the First Lady of New Jersey Tammy Snyder Murphy.

During the conference, Princeton Hydro, a proud sponsor of the event, lead three workshops on a variety of topics. Below, we provide a synopsis and free download of each presentation:

 

Fundraising & Marketing Strategy:
“Nonprofit Storytelling A-Z: How to Transform Passive Clickers into Action Takers”

Our Communication Strategist, Dana Patterson, along with Lindsay McNamara of the National Audubon Society lead a workshop that taught participants how to use values-driven and science-congruent narratives to reach key stakeholders and supporters in the New Jersey conservation community and beyond. Dana and Lindsay demonstrated how to implement humanistic storytelling strategies and translate technical stats and science findings into interesting, relatable stories that will resonate with and activate valuable target audiences.

Download the full presentation

 

Community Education & Outreach:
“Floating Classroom: Successful Citizen Science on New Jersey’s Largest Lake”

Chris Mikolajczyk, CLM, our Senior Aquatic Scientist, and Donna Macalle-Holly, Grant and Program Director for Lake Hopatcong Foundation, discussed how to start an innovative citizen science project in the community. For the presentation, they showcased a recently launched and highly successful citizen-science initiative: the “Floating Classroom.” Together, the Lake Hopatcong Foundation and Princeton Hydro conceptualized, funded, and launched a custom-built 40-foot education vessel that provides community members and students an interactive, hands-on education experience to explore Lake Hopatcong while learning about freshwater ecology. This initiative has helped to engage the community in stewardship while continuing to closely monitor the lake’s water quality.

Download the full presentation

 

Ecology & Stewardship:
“From Scum to Fish – A Journey Through the Aquatic Food Web and its Management”

Our Director of Aquatic Programs, Dr. Fred Lubnow, and our Senior Aquatic Ecologist, Dr. Jack Szczepanski, lead a workshop on the many facets that make-up a healthy freshwater ecosystem. They explored the various types of life that inhabit the aquatic environment: from algae and cyanobacteria to submerged aquatic vegetation and fish. And, they delved into each one’s place in the food web, how they interact with each other, their effects on the health of the water they live in, and management techniques to tackle water quality issues associated with each.

Download the full presentation

 

The NJ Land Conservation Rally conference also included presentations on topics ranging from environmental advocacy to land acquisition to urban conservation to non-profit organizational management. To view presentation hand-outs and learn more about the conference, go here.

Princeton Hydro is a proud supporter of the New Jersey Conservation Foundation, a private, nonprofit organization that relies on philanthropic support and grants from a variety of public and private organizations and individual donors. Through acquisition and stewardship, they protect strategic lands, promote strong land use policies, and forge partnerships through education and assistance programs. Since 1960, New Jersey Conservation Foundation has protected over 120,000 acres of natural areas and farmland in New Jersey – from the Highlands to the Pine Barrens to the Delaware Bay, from farms to forests to urban and suburban parks. For more information, or to become a member, go here.

Winter Events Spotlight: Environmental Conferences & Classes

Over the coming months, Princeton Hydro is teaching courses and presenting at a variety of conferences that explore topics ranging from wetland restoration to cyanotoxins to dam removal:

 

January 2019 – May 2019: Temple University Wetland Ecology Course

Our Vice President Mark Gallagher, along with Founding Principal and Consultant Dr. Steve Souza, is teaching an applied wetland ecology graduate course at Temple University. The 17-week spring semester course, which includes weekly lectures as well as field trips, will provide students with an opportunity to study real-world examples of wetland and riparian restoration and the integration of wetland ecology and restoration design within the context of green infrastructure.

Students will gain an increased understanding of the ecological functions of wetland and riparian ecosystems; be introduced to the principles of applied ecology as related to wetland and riparian ecosystem restoration; learn about the application of wetland ecology in landscape restoration and enhancement projects; get hands-on experience with how to use green infrastructure techniques in urban and suburban settings to control and abate stormwater impacts; and learn about related state and federal rules and regulations.

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January 2019 – May 2019: Delaware Valley University Watershed Management Course

Beginning January 22, Dr. Fred Lubnow, our Director of Aquatic Programs, is teaching a spring semester “Watershed Management” course at Delaware Valley University. Through hands-on laboratory exercises and engaging lectures, the course provides participants with the foundational skills needed to understand the concepts and terminology of hydrologic processes and watersheds. The concepts and processes include evapotranspiration, soil water, infiltration, runoff, and stream flow. Students will also develop skills in environmental awareness, ecological awareness, and land stewardship, which will help them understand the key processes involved in managing watershed resources sustainably.

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January 27-30, 2019: Delaware Estuary Science and Environmental Summit, Cape May, NJ

Every two years, the Partnership for the Delaware Estuary holds a summit that focuses on developing practical solutions to challenges facing our tidal Delaware River and Bay. This year, the theme is Estuary 2029: Saving Our System Through Collaboration. Our Communications Strategist, Dana Patterson, is presenting “Strategic Science Communication & Stakeholder Engagement in the Delaware Estuary” during the Strategic Science Communication Session on Monday, January 28th. 

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March 6-7, 2019: Pennsylvania Lake Management Society’s 29th Annual Conference

This two-day conference covers a wide range of topics such as invasive aquatic plant identification and eradication, harmful algal blooms (HABS), case studies of publicly funded projects and stewardship programs, management or remediation techniques, habitat or fishery improvement, and chemical application techniques. Core and category credits are available for professional chemical applicators for many of the presentations.  We’re proud to sponsor this conference year after year.  Dr. Fred Lubnow, Princeton Hydro’s Director of Aquatic Programs, is giving a presentation about utilizing a watershed implementation plan to address both the external and internal phosphorus loads for Lake Carey, Pennsylvania.  Come visit our booth and say hello to our Aquatics team members. BONUS: Every full conference registration also includes one free year of PALMS membership.

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March 9, 2019: Watershed Congress Along the Schuylkill River

Hosted by the Delaware Riverkeeper Network, this conference is a highly anticipated event for people in the Schuylkill Watershed and beyond interested in understanding, protecting, and restoring their local streams and watersheds. Princeton Hydro is a proud sponsor and exhibitor of this conference. Come check out an hour-long, dynamic session on “Using Values-Driven Communication Strategies To Engage Your Watershed,” hosted by our Communications Strategist, Dana Patterson.

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March 14, 2019: Land Ethics Symposium

Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve presents its 19th Annual Land Ethics Symposium. The conference, titled “Creative Approaches for Ecological Landscaping,” will focus on ways to create low-maintenance, economical and ecologically balanced landscapes using native plants and restoration techniques.

Participants can take part in presentations, for which continuing education credits are available, on topics, including Urban Restoration Ecology, Economic Ecology: Thinking Regionally & Working Together to Solve Water Resource Issues, and Wetland Restoration. The conference also offers a variety of networking events and an exhibitor hall. Princeton Hydro, a sponsor of the event, will have an exhibitor table. We hope to see you there!

LEARN MORE & REGISTER

 

March 21, 2019: The Pennsylvania Water Works Association’s Northeast District Spring Meeting

The PA-AWWA Northeast District and the Water Works Operators’ Association of Pennsylvania Eastern Section are hosting a Spring 2019 Meeting, which will cover a range of technical topics related to water resource management. Dr. Fred Lubnow is teaching a three-hour course on the monitoring and management of cyanotoxins in sources of raw water.

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March 22, 2019: The Soil & Water Conservation Society (SWCS) Southern New England Chapter (SNEC) 2019 Annual Winter Conference

SWCSSNEC is a 501 (c) (3) organization whose purpose is to promote, educate and advance all phases of the science of conservation of soil, water, and all related resources. The Annual Winter Conference, themed “Going with the Flow”, offers a variety of presentations focused on topics related to stream continuity.

Director of our New England office Laura Wildman, PE, considered one of the foremost experts on barrier removal and alternative fish passage techniques, is giving a presentation titled “Dam Removal; When Less is More”. Other presentation topics include: environmental monitoring and unmanned aircraft systems (UAS)/drones; rehabilitation of aging structures to allow fish migration; and ecological disruption associated with road-stream crossings.

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March 27, 2019: NEW JERSEY INVASIVE SPECIES STRIKE TEAM ANNUAL CONFERENCE

Presented by the Friends of Hopewell Valley Open Space, the Annual New Jersey Invasive Species Strike Team Conference is considered the most comprehensive state-wide forum on invasive species. The conference, being held at Duke Farms, brings participants together to collaborate and address new and emerging invasive species issues from a state-wide perspective, and includes an exhibitor hall, networking opportunities and a variety of presentations and panel discussions on topics, including river restoration, managing deer and invasive species to improve forest health, and meadow restoration tips.

Princeton Hydro, a proud sponsor of the conference, will be exhibiting and presenting. Mark Gallagher, Princeton Hydro Vice President, along with Jenn Rogers of Mercer County Park Commission, will present on the topic of freshwater tidal wetland at John A. Roebling Memorial Park in New Jersey. Mercer County Park Commission and Princeton Hydro worked together to reduce and control invasive, and restore the park’s Abbott Marshland. Read more about the project here: http://bit.ly/RoeblingMarshRestoration

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March 30, 2019: Northwest New Jersey Rivers Conference

Free and open to the public, the Delaware River Watershed Initiative’s Northwest New Jersey Rivers Conference is an event focused around working together to protect the Delaware River, specifically related to the Highlands and Ridge & Valley regions of New Jersey. Presentation topics include river conservation and restoration, community outreach and education, sustainable agriculture and food waste reduction, and much more. Attendees will walk alway with tangible ideas for how to bring their communities together to defend and share the Delaware River and its precious resources.

The first workshop of the day is a panel discussion titled, “Environmental Commissions: The Why and How of Getting Started in Your Community”, at which Princeton Hydro’s Communication Strategist Dana Patterson will be fielding questions from the audience. We hope to see you there!

LEARN MORE & REGISTER

 

Also, Coming Up This Spring:
April 4-6, 2019: ATLANTIC ESTUARINE RESEARCH SOCIETY (AERS) SPRING MEETING

This year’s AERS Spring Meeting, titled “From the head of the tide to the edge of the shelf,” will emphasize the breath and spatial scale of estuaries and coasts. Participants will gather at George Mason University’s brand-new Potomac Science Center to hear a variety of presentations on topics ranging from freshwater tidal ecosystems to coastal oceans, and particularly the connections and exchange between these systems. Princeton Hydro’s Senior Aquatics Scientist Jack Szczepanski, PhD is presenting and exhibiting at the conference.

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April 12, 2019: New Jersey Land Conservation Rally

Conservation Innovations in a Changing World is the theme this year for the 23rd Annual NJ Land Conservation Rally. We’re excited to sponsor this one-day educational conference about preserving open space and farmland in New Jersey. Start your morning off with a dynamic marketing session, “Nonprofit Storytelling A-Z: How to Transform Passive Clickers into Action Takers,” hosted by Princeton Hydro’s Communications Strategist, Dana Patterson and National Audubon Society‘s Mid-Level Giving Manager, Lindsay McNamara.  Check out a great afternoon session with our Aquatics Director, Dr. Fred Lubnow, and Senior Aquatic Scientist, Dr. Dr. Jack Szczepanski, who will offer tips on, “The Monitoring and Management of Cyanotoxins in Recreational Lakes and Managing Your Lake’s Fisheries.” And, don’t forget to say “hello” to all of our staff at our exhibitor booth during the conference.

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April 12, 2019: Environmental Business Council of New England Meeting

Princeton Hydro recently joined as a business member of the Environmental Business Council (EBC) of New England, a nonprofit organization dedicated to enhancing business and job growth of both established and emerging environmental and energy businesses. EBC provides member companies with an array of programs, activities, and information to enable them to stay on the cutting edge of environmental and energy technologies, management and regulatory developments. At this EPC meeting, our Director of our New England office, Laura Wildman, PE, and Fluvial Geomorphologist, Paul Woodworth, are hosting a workshop for members on “Dam Removal and Sediment Management.”

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STAY TUNED FOR MORE EVENT SPOTLIGHTS!

EMPLOYEE SPOTLIGHT: Meet the Interns

This summer, Princeton Hydro is hosting five interns, each of whom are passionate about protecting water quality and preserving our natural resources. From June to August, our interns will gain professional work experience in a variety of subject areas, ranging from stormwater management to dam restoration to ecological design to lake management and much more. They are assisting on a variety of projects, getting real-world practice in their areas of study, and working with a Princeton Hydro mentor who is helping them gain a deeper understanding of the business of environmental and engineering consulting and setting them up for career success.

 

Meet Our Interns:

 

Ivy Babson, Environmental Science Intern

Ivy is a rising senior from University of Vermont, majoring in Environmental Science with a concentration in Ecological Design, and minor in Geospatial Technologies. In the future, she hopes to implement ecological design in urban areas and create a sustainable environment that would allow future generations to care for and interact with a healthy earth.

Ivy will work alongside Senior Aquatics Scientist Dr. Jack Szczepanski and the Princeton Hydro Aquatics team on projects related to lake and pond management, including fisheries management, data collection and analysis, and water quality monitoring. Recently, Ivy assisted Aquatic Ecologist Jesse Smith in completing an electrofishing survey in a Northern New Jersey river.

Learn more about Ivy.

 

Marissa Ciocco, Geotechnical Intern

Marissa is entering her fourth year at Rowan University where she is a Civil and Environmental Engineering major with a Bantivoglio Honors Concentration. In the future, Marissa hopes to work towards creating a greener and safer environment.

During her internship, Marissa will be mentored by Jim Hunt P.E., Geotechnical Engineer, who has already engaged Marissa in a few construction oversight projects, including a culvert restoration effort in Medford Lakes, NJ and observing geotechnical borings in Evesham, NJ.

Learn more about Marissa.

 

Will Kelleher, Environmental Science Intern

Will is a rising junior at the University of Vermont, studying Environmental Science with a concentration in Water Resources. His current career interests are focused around wetlands restoration and water chemistry. He recently spent two weeks studying water management and sustainable technology in the Netherlands and in the past has helped with biological and chemical stream monitoring with Raritan Headwaters Association.

Mentored by Senior Aquatics Scientist Dr. Jack Szczepanski, Will’s area of focus will be lake and pond management. He’ll spend most of his time in the field alongside members of the Aquatics Team collecting water quality data and mapping aquatic plants, learning about aquatic habitat creation, and implementing various invasive aquatic weed control efforts.

Learn more about Will.

 

Veronica Moditz, Water Resources Intern

We are thrilled to welcome back Veronica, who interned with us last year, and is in her final year at Stevens Institute of Technology, pursuing a Bachelor Degree in Environmental Engineering and a Master Degree in Sustainability Management. She is currently the secretary for Steven’s Environmental Engineering Professional Society chapter. In the future, she hopes to work on more sustainable approach to engineering problems.

Veronica will work alongside Project Engineer and Construction Specialist Amy McNamara, EIT, and Mary L. Paist-Goldman, P.E., Director of Engineering Services, on a variety of environmental engineering projects. Most recently, she assisted with a construction oversight and stormwater management project in Morris County, NJ.

Learn more about Veronica.

 

Tucker Simmons, Water Resources Engineer

Tucker is a Civil and Environmental Engineering major at Rowan University focusing on Water Resources Engineering. His Junior Clinic experience includes the study of Bio-Cemented sand and the Remote Sensing of Landfill Fires. In the future, Tucker hopes to work on creating a more sustainable environment.

Throughout his internship, Tucker will be mentored by Dr. Clay Emerson, P.E. CFM, Senior Water Resources Engineer, and will work on projects related to stormwater management, hydrologic and hydraulic analysis, and various aspects of environmental restoration. He recently assisted with a sink hole inspection in Tredyffrin Township, PA and mapped the water depths of a lake in Bucks County, PA.

Learn more about Tucker.

 

Stay tuned for updates on what our interns are working on!

 

 

 

“Floating Classroom” Launches into Lake Hopatcong

The Lake Hopatcong Foundation (LHF) recently launched its newest initiative – a floating classroom. The custom-built 40-foot education vessel, named ‘Study Hull’, gives students an interactive, hands-on education experience to explore Lake Hopatcong, learn about freshwater ecology, and learn how to protect the watershed.

During its maiden voyage field trip, which was held on May 21, fourth-graders from Nixon Elementary and Kennedy Elementary schools utilized the boat’s laboratory instruments to study water hydrology, temperatures, plankton, and dissolved oxygen levels. They performed a series of tests and experiments designed to help them learn about the general health of the lake. They used Secchi Disks to determine the depth to which light is able to penetrate the water’s surface. They also learned about runoff and nonpoint source pollutants, how to protect the lake’s water quality, and how to be good stewards of the water.

Princeton Hydro helped the LHF design a teaching curriculum on water quality.  Dr. Jack Szczepanski, Senior Aquatics Scientist, and Christopher L. Mikolajczyk, CLM, Senior Project Scientist, trained the staff and volunteers on the curriculum and demonstrated various water quality monitoring techniques that can be conducted with the students.

“We’re really proud to be a part of this exciting initiative,” said Mikolajczyk. “It’s really important to get kids interested in science at an early age and teach them about their surrounding environment – where their drinking water comes from, how it gets polluted, the impacts pollution has on the lake’s ecosystem, and what steps can be made to protect the lake’s water quality. We’re hoping the floating classroom field trip program will make a lasting, valuable impression with these kids.”

In the first year of operation it is expected that the Study Hull will host 1,000 fourth grade students. The long-term goal is to develop lesson plans for students in every grade from kindergarten through high school. Starting in July, the LHF is also offering the public tours of the floating classroom on Mondays at Hopatcong State Park.

The purchase of the floating classroom was made possible by financial support from USATODAY Network’s “A Community Thrives” program, which awarded the LHF with a $50,000 grant. The program recognizes three categories: arts and culture, education, and wellness. In each category, the first place winner received a $100,000 grant and the second and third place winners received $50,000 grants. The James P. Verhalen Family Foundation and the Szigethy Family also provided significant donations to help bring the floating classroom to life.

 

The LHF and Princeton Hydro are longtime partners. Starting back in 1983, Princeton Hydro’s Dr. Stephen Souza conducted the USEPA funded Diagnostic Feasibility study of the lake and then authored the Lake Hopatcong Restoration Plan. That document continues to be the backbone of why and how to restore the lake, manage the watershed, reduce pollutant loading, and address invasive aquatic plants and nuisance algae blooms.

Lake Hopatcong has one of the longest, continuous, long-term ecological databases in New Jersey; almost 30 years of consistently collected water quality data. The data is crucial in assessing the overall ecological health of the lake and proactively guiding its management, identifying and addressing emerging threats, documenting project success (a mandatory element of funding initiatives) and confirming compliance with New Jersey State Water Quality standards.

Princeton Hydro’s most recent work for Lake Hopatcong includes the implementation of green infrastructure stormwater management measures, installation of floating wetland islands to improve water quality, and invasive aquatic plant species management programs, community educational training, and surveys.

For more information about the Lake Hopatcong Foundation or the floating classroom, click here. For more information about Princeton Hydro’s lake management services, go here.