Employee Spotlight: Meet Our New Team Members

Join us in welcoming ten new team members! We’ve hired four full-time staff and six part-time staff and interns spread throughout our Ringoes, Sicklerville, and Glastonbury offices.

Meet the new team members:

MARCIE ROBINSON, P.E., Senior Project Manager

With nearly two decades of experience in both the private and public sectors, Marcie has extensive knowledge of both facets of the civil engineering world. Her area of expertise includes water resource engineering and more specifically stormwater management, having designed multiple stormwater facilities utilizing best management practices. Marcie has worked on all aspects of land development projects including residential, industrial, commercial, and educational site plans and subdivisions; construction administration; and municipal engineering. She has prepared capital improvement projects for local municipalities and reviewed land development projects for conformance with local ordinances and the NJDEP stormwater regulations.

Outside of work, Marcie enjoys camping, gardening, raising money for various charities, and spending time with her husband, son, and beagle. She is eager to utilize her technical background, problem solving skills, and motivation to contribute to new challenging projects.

SAMARA MCAULIFFE, Executive Advisor & Employee Relations Manager

With over ten years of human resources and management experience, Samara has worked as a business partner and advisor in various sectors, from finance to retail. Her hands-on experience includes researching and resolution of complex human resources related issues, recruitment process management, HRIS implementation, representation at unemployment hearings, creation of EEOC position statements, leading and administering open enrollment initiatives, as well as management coaching and training.

Outside of work, Samara is an active member of her community, volunteering for various causes dear to her heart. She enjoys spending time with her son and daughter and makes every effort to be outside as much as possible, preferably hiking or kayaking.

Marissa Ciocco, Staff Engineer

After spending the last year interning for our Geosciences Engineering Practice Area, we’re thrilled to have Marissa join our team full-time. She is a recent graduate of Rowan University holding a B.S. in Civil and Environmental Engineering with a Bantivoglio Honors Concentration. She was a member of the Orientation Staff for two years and is a member of the Student Alumni Association. She participated in the CREATE’s Fellowship program at Rowan University, and currently helps out at a local french bakery and tea room on the weekends. Her Junior Clinic class experience includes a green roof feasibility study and testing the effects of water quality on masonry mortar. In the future, Marissa hopes to work towards creating a greener and safer environment.

Marissa enjoys playing field hockey, cooking, knitting, car rides, and spending time with family and friends. She also enjoys watching home improvement shows, listening to country music, and mumbling phrases in Italian.

Ivy Babson, Staff Scientist

Ivy, who previously interned with us last summer, recently earned her B.S. in Environmental Science with a concentration in Ecological Design, and minor in Geospatial Technologies from the University of Vermont, and has now joined our team full time. During her studies, she was a member of UVM’s Humanitarian Mapping Club and has “virtually” responded to earthquake and hurricane relief efforts in Puerto Rico, Mexico, Texas, and Afghanistan via interactive spatial imagery programs. Ivy has also been the Art Editor of UVM’s alternative newspaper, drawing attention to environmental and social issues through articles and cartoons. Ivy worked closely through her school with the Vermont Chapter of The Nature Conservancy to create a restoration plan and GIS map of an altered wetland near Lake Champlain that would hopefully help regain the ecosystem services lost from agricultural development. In the future, she hopes to implement ecological design in impacted ecosystems and in urban areas to help rehabilitate and restore damaged resources.

Ivy enjoys drawing, listening to her favorite 90s alt rock bands, road tripping, and watching re-runs of It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia.

eric Libis, Aquatics specialist

Eric Libis is passionate of the outdoors. As a resident of Alaska, Eric has extensive hands on experience with nature in all its forms. Previously, he’s held a variety of positions including small engine mechanic, project manager, and served in the U.S. Army. New to Princeton Hydro, he hopes to expand his conservation skills and knowledge while providing his experience to the field operations team.

Fond of all things outdoors, Eric can (or cannot) be found, hiking in the back-country, mountaineering, rock mineral and fossil collecting, camping (both primitive and modern), boating, fishing, trail-building, and educating the leaders of tomorrow of the importance in preserving nature for everyone to enjoy.

Becca Burrell, Communications Intern

Becca is a senior at the University of Pittsburgh, working to attain a degree in Media and Professional Communications on the Corporate and Community Relations track, along with a certificate in Public and Professional Writing. Through her previous experience and classwork, Rebecca has learned how to engage with others through social media, writing, and marketing. At Pitt, Rebecca is a member of two honor societies, plays intramural field hockey, and is on the events committee for the Imagination Project, a group that dresses as famous characters in kids’ movies/TV shows and visits local children’s hospitals and other rec centers. She is also a student worker in the English Department. At Princeton Hydro, she is excited to promote and further the company’s goals through the use of thoughtful communication strategies.

During her free time, you can find Becca hanging out with her family, friends, and dog. She also enjoys reading, taking walks, and binge-watching shows on Netflix.

Will Kelleher, Environmental Science Intern

Will returns to Princeton Hydro for second summer with our Aquatics team. Will is a rising senior at the University of Vermont, studying Environmental Science with a concentration in Water Resources. His current career interests are focused around wetlands restoration and water chemistry. He recently spent two weeks studying water management and sustainable technology in the Netherlands and in the past has helped with biological and chemical stream monitoring with Raritan Headwaters Association. At school, he is involved in many environmental clubs on campus including Wildlife Society, Beekeeping Club and Green House Residential Sustainability.

Outside his love for the environment, Will is also an avid hockey fan, fisherman, and aspiring traveler of the world.

Nicole King, Water Resources Intern

Nicole is an environmental engineering student with experienced in CAD drafting, technical writing, and environmental sampling processes. Prior to Princeton Hydro, she worked for an automated assembly systems manufacturer where she developed her drafting skills and organized an archive system for their project drawings.As a freshman at the University of New Hampshire, Nicole has participated in research investigating the effect of high precipitation events using coded and built pressure-depth sensors in a dammed reservoir. She is also a part of an entrepreneurship club where she expressed innovation and collaboration with other members.

In her free time, Nicole competitively swims and enjoys reading, drawing, and watching movies.

Nina Petracca, landscape design intern

Nina is a rising senior at Rutgers University studying in the Landscape Architecture Program. In her studies Nina has focused on park design, environmental planning, stream bank restoration and planting design. Her most recent project involved designing a park in Germany to compliment an engineered wetland. When she enters the Rutgers Landscape Architecture MLA Program she plans to focus her education on wetland design and its beneficial relation to the community. Over the course of her internship with us, Nina hopes to gain a better understanding of wetland design and eco-restoration and develop stronger graphic skills.

In her free time Nina enjoys hiking, dancing, cooking, spending time with loved ones and being a bird mom.

Lucas Pick, Environmental Science Intern

Lucas is entering his final year at the College of New Jersey. He is majoring in Biology with a focus in Ecology and Evolution and is minoring in Statistics. He performs research through TCNJ to investigate the interactive effects of deer and invasive species on suburban forest plant communities. He is also working on a capstone study to develop a structural equation model that encompasses the driving factors for oak regeneration. Lucas has been exposed to a wide variety of natural resource management projects, including forest stand improvements, wetland enhancements, stream restorations, and dam removals. He is seeking a career in ecology, agriculture, and natural resource management, and has joined Princeton Hydro in hopes of developing his knowledge of aquatic ecology and environmental science.

In his free time, Lucas enjoys long distance running, playing baseball, and practicing guitar.

Learn more about our team.

 

Employee Spotlight: Meet Our New Team Members

We’re excited to announce the expansion of our growing business with the addition of six team members who have experience and qualifications in a variety of fields related to water resource management.

Meet the new team members:

alexi sanchez de boado, DC Regional Office Manager and Senior Project Manager

As DC Regional Office Manager and Senior Project Manager, Alexi focuses on watershed management and green infrastructure. For almost two decades, he has managed watershed management projects in the DC metro area, and beyond, for federal, state, county and local governments and other government entities under the authority of the Clean Water Act, National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES), and related regulations.

Serving as an urban watershed manager and regulator for six years for the District of Columbia’s Watershed Protection Division, Nonpoint Source Management Branch, Alexi managed cross-jurisdictional, urban watershed rehabilitation projects, developed and coordinated the District’s Low Impact Development (LID) Initiatives Program, and oversaw complex stream and watershed assessment projects with a huge variety of stakeholders, from local NGOs to federal land holders. Since then, he has consulted as a scientist in both large and small consulting firms focusing on stormwater pollution, stream restoration, watershed planning, and green infrastructure.

Alexi holds a Master of Science in Environmental and Forest Biology from the State University of New York (SUNY) College of Environmental Science and Forestry (ESF) and a Master of Public Administration from the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Syracuse University.

In his spare time, Alexi enjoys attending concerts, biking, and traveling, especially through Latin America.

Amanda cote, regulatory specialist

Amanda graduated from Bridgewater State University in Massachusetts with a Bachelor of Science in Geography. She has background knowledge in GIS which lead her to work in college labs making maps and running various applications.  She has also participated in water resources projects and is eager to learn.

In her free time, she enjoys being in the great outdoors. Adventuring is a huge part of her life in any form that she can experience it: hiking, fishing, snowshoeing, swimming, backpacking, etc. But of all places to explore, Amanda’s favorite place to be is on top of a mountain, reflecting on and appreciating the journey she took to climb to its peak.

Matt PapPas, staff engineer

Matt is a newcomer to the engineering field, just graduating in the summer of 2018 with a Bachelor Degree in Civil Engineering and minor in Environmental Engineering from the University of Delaware. As an undergraduate, he was an active member of the UD ASCE chapter, where he was a leader in the organization and eventual captain of the concrete canoe team.

Prior to Princeton Hydro, he worked for a large construction firm in Delaware where he became quite familiar with the practical engineering world and was able to develop his working knowledge of constructability as well as hone his technical writing skills.

In his spare time, Matt enjoys cooking, hiking and wood carving.

Johnny quispe, Environmental Scientist

Johnny is a PhD candidate at Rutgers University’s Graduate Program of Ecology and Evolution investigating the effects of sea level rise on coastal ecosystems and communities. Through his research, he is identifying migration opportunity zones for marsh migration as well as areas for restoration and flood risk management. Johnny integrates social, economic, engineering, and natural systems into his projects to make coastal communities more resilient to natural disasters and climate change.

After Johnny earned his Bachelor of Science in Environmental Policy, Institutions, and Behaviors at Rutgers University, he focused on the conservation, restoration, and remediation of sites in NJ via a variety of roles in the nonprofit, public, and academic sectors. Johnny interned at the New Jersey Department of State and the Office of the Lieutenant Governor, New Jersey Future, Jersey Water Works, and at USEPA Region 2 Headquarters, where he conducted research for the Emergency and Remedial Response Division. In his spare time, he enjoys traveling, hiking, and playing board games.

Jake Schwartz, Project Engineer

Jake is a Project Engineer with a BS in Civil Engineering from Rowan University, which he earned in 2017. After graduating college, Jake worked for a civil and environmental consulting company, where he gained experience with stormwater design, flooding, grading, site layout, construction inspection/administration, and environmental regulation. Prior to his career in civil engineering, Jake worked his way up in the pool industry, starting as a swim instructor. He quickly moved up to a life guard position, and then eventually became responsible for managing 12 commercial swimming pools. As a pool manager, Jake was responsible for system upkeep and water chemistry in the swimming pools. This position enabled Jake to acquire hands on experience with water chemistry and hydraulic principles. In this position, Jake also oversaw 40 staff members, leaving him with substantial leadership experience. Jake’s goal is to use his knowledge and experience to design sustainable site plans for Princeton Hydro’s projects.

Outside of work, Jake enjoys hiking, swimming, going to the beach, and hanging out with friends.

RYAN WASIK, EIT, water resource engineer

Ryan is a Water Resource Engineer with a B.S. in Civil Engineering and a minor in Environmental Engineering from Widener University in in Chester, PA. After graduating, he worked as a highway inspector for roadway reconstruction and rehab projects in Delaware. Then, he worked as a project engineer designing and drafting for a wide range of civil/site design projects throughout the Philadelphia region and New Jersey. He has experience in roadway design, ADA ramp design, site grading and layout, utility design, erosion and sediment control measures, and stormwater design/inspections.

In his free time, Ryan enjoys playing golf, disk golf, running, and playing bass guitar.

New Green Infrastructure Toolkit for Municipalities

Our partner, New Jersey Future, just launched a brand new, interactive website toolkit to help municipalities across the state incorporate green infrastructure projects into their communities. The New Jersey Green Infrastructure Municipal Toolkit will provide expert information on planning, implementing, and sustaining green infrastructure to manage stormwaterThis toolkit acts as a one-stop resource for community leaders who want to sustainably manage stormwater, reduce localized flooding, and improve water quality.

According to the United States EPA, a significant amount of rivers, lakes, ponds, bays, and estuaries in New Jersey fall into the “Impaired Waters” category, meaning that one or more of their uses are not being met. This reality makes green infrastructure more important than ever in the effort to protect our waterways. When it rains, stormwater creates runoff, which often carries pollution to various types of waterbodies. Green stormwater infrastructure helps to absorb and filter rainwater, reducing the pollution entering our waterways and mitigating flooding in our communities. In urban areas, green infrastructure utilizes natural vegetation to divert stormwater, creating a cost-effective and aesthetically-pleasing way to manage water during rain events.

“We designed this toolkit to bring to light the benefits and importance of investing in green infrastructure at the local level,” said Dr. Stephen Souza, co-founder of Princeton Hydro. “Since the current NJ stormwater rules do not require green infrastructure, we hope to inspire municipal engineers and planning board members to believe in the value through our toolkit. Additionally, we hope it will serve as an educational resource to local officials and decision makers in the Garden State.”

For this project, Princeton Hydro was contracted by Clarke Caton Hintz, an architecture, design, and planning firm, leading this effort on behalf of the nonprofit organization New Jersey Future. Our expert engineers and scientists provided real-world examples integrating green infrastructure into development, in hopes of showing those using the toolkit real world evidence of how green infrastructure can be a part of the daily lexicon of stormwater management. Additionally, Dr. Stephen Souza developed performance standards that municipalities can integrate into stormwater management plans, which are available in the Green Infrastructure Municipal Toolkit.

Volunteers Pitch In at New Jersey’s Thompson Park

A volunteer effort, lead by the Middlesex County, New Jersey Parks and Recreation Department and the Rutgers Cooperative Extension, recently took place at Thompson Park.

Despite the rainy weather, 78 volunteers and members of the Youth Conservation Corps removed litter from the shoreline of Manalapan Lake, repaired fencing, made improvements to the park’s walking trails, weeded and mulched the park’s rain garden and native plant garden, and installed new plants in the rain garden.

The park’s rain garden was originally designed by Princeton Hydro Senior Water Resource Engineer Dr. Clay Emerson, PE, CFM. Rain gardens are cost effective, attractive and sustainable means to minimize stormwater runoff. They also help to reduce erosion, promote groundwater recharge, minimize flooding and remove pollutants from runoff.

By definition, a rain garden is a shallow depression that is planted with deep-rooted native plants and grasses, and positioned near a runoff source to capture rainwater. Planting native plants also helps to attract pollinators and birds and naturally reduces mosquitos by removing standing water thus reducing mosquito breeding areas.

Rain gardens temporarily store rainwater and runoff, and filter the water of hydrocarbons, oil, heavy metals, phosphorous, fertilizers and other pollutants that would normally find their way to the sewer and even our rivers and waterways.

On the day of the volunteer event, Central New Jersey received 0.44 inches of rain.  “We got to see the rain garden in action, which was really exciting,” said Princeton Hydro Senior Project Manager Kelly Klein, who volunteered at the event.

Volunteers from the following organizations participated:

  • Edison Metro Lions Club
  • Hioki USA Corporation
  • Girl Scout Troop 70306
  • East Brunswick Youth Council
  • Monroe Middle School
  • South Plainfield High School
  • Rutgers University
  • Master Gardeners of Middlesex County
  • Foresters Financial
  • Princeton Hydro

The Middlesex County Parks and Recreation Department’s next public volunteer event is tomorrow (June 2) in Davidson’s Mill Pond Park.

The Princeton Hydro team has designed and constructed countless stormwater management systems, including rain gardens in locations throughout the Eastern U.S. Click here for more information about our stormwater management services.

Princeton Hydro Supports Creation of Stormwater Utilities in New Jersey

For Immediate Release: May 15, 2018

PRESS STATEMENT 

On behalf of Princeton Hydro, LLC, a leading water resources engineering and natural resource management small business firm in New Jersey, we support the passing of New Jersey’s stormwater utility creation bill, S-1073. If S-1073 is administered in a responsible manner, we believe that it will enhance water quality and reduce flooding impacts in New Jersey.

Since our inception, Princeton Hydro has been a leader in innovative, cost-effective, and environmentally sound stormwater management. Long before the term “green infrastructure” was part of the design community’s lexicon, our engineers were integrating stormwater management with natural systems to fulfill such diverse objectives as flood control, water quality protection, and pollutant reduction. Our staff has developed regional nonpoint source pollutant budgets for over 100 waterways. The preparation of stormwater management plans and design of stormwater management systems for pollutant reduction is an integral part of many of our projects.

We have seen the benefits of allowing for stormwater utilities firsthand. In Maryland, the recently implemented watershed restoration program and MS4 efforts that require stormwater utility fees have provided a job creating-industry boom that benefits engineers, contractors, and local DPWs. At the same time, Maryland’s program is improving the water quality in the Chesapeake Bay, and stimulating the tourism and the crabbing/fishing industry.

New Jersey has the very same issues with our water resources as Maryland. Just like the Chesapeake Bay, our Barnegat Bay, Raritan Bay, and Lake Hopatcong have serious issues with stormwater runoff that is degrading our water quality and quality of life.  Our stormwater infrastructure is old and falling apart, and all stormwater utilities need continual maintenance to save money in the long run.

It is important to point out that this current bill is not a mandatory requirement, and would simply provide a mechanism for various levels of government (county, municipality, etc.) to collect a stormwater utility fee in order to recover runoff management costs.

This bill (S-1073) should not be reviewed only in the context of cost, as this bill meets all three elements of the  triple-bottom line of sustainability; social, environmental, and financial. Allowing stormwater utilities in New Jersey will create jobs, help reduce flood impacts, enhance water quality, improve our fisheries, and preserve our water-based tourism economy. 40 states have already implemented stormwater utilities, and we believe that it is time for New Jersey to join the ranks.

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